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You searched for subject:(Vincenzo Danti). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Kent State University

1. Kitchen, Stacie Lauren. Preferences of Patronage in the Portraits of Cosimo I de' Medici.

Degree: MS, College of the Arts / School of Art, 2011, Kent State University

Duke Cosimo I de’ Medici utilized artists to form images of himself under the guise of a Roman Imperial ruler and as a successful Medici heir. A selection of artists were chosen for his portraiture, and depending on their preferred media, each played a different role for the Duke. Cosimo’s painters, Pontormo, Bronzino, and Vasari, created images of the Duke that affirmed his authority to rule based on his Medici lineage. These portrait painters, selected based on their ability to produce lifelike portraits and facilitate the Medici <i>impresa</i> following the Duke’s political agenda, had many similarities. These similarities include previous employment under the Medici, adaptability to the Duke’s demands, and a strong knowledge of Medici and Florentine art. Duke Cosimo followed a sequence with his painters and generally just employed one at a time for his portraits. Cosimo’s selected sculptors, Bandinelli, Cellini and Danti, constantly vied for the Duke’s favor. The portraits created by the sculptors emphasized the Duke’s assumed relationship with Emperor Augustus, utilizing more idealized physical features and the warrior persona. Much like the painters, the sculptors were chosen by Cosimo I based on their similarities in their training background and their prior relationship to the Medici family. However, Cosimo did not develop strong loyalty to just one sculptor at a time, and these sculptors worked against one another to gain commissions. Giambologna is a special case in this study since his portraiture of Cosimo I was created under the patronage of Cosimo’s son, Francesco I de’ Medici, yet was completed while Cosimo was still living. Giambologna’s position in the court of the Medici differs widely from the painters and sculptors selected under Duke Cosimo’s patronage. Advisors/Committee Members: Medicus, Gustav (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Art History; Cosimo I de' Medici; portraiture; Jacopo Pontormo; Agnolo Bronzino; Giorgio Vasari; Baccio Bandinelli; Benvenuto Cellini; Vincenzo Danti; Giambologna; portrait busts

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kitchen, S. L. (2011). Preferences of Patronage in the Portraits of Cosimo I de' Medici. (Masters Thesis). Kent State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1310853430

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kitchen, Stacie Lauren. “Preferences of Patronage in the Portraits of Cosimo I de' Medici.” 2011. Masters Thesis, Kent State University. Accessed November 12, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1310853430.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kitchen, Stacie Lauren. “Preferences of Patronage in the Portraits of Cosimo I de' Medici.” 2011. Web. 12 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Kitchen SL. Preferences of Patronage in the Portraits of Cosimo I de' Medici. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Kent State University; 2011. [cited 2019 Nov 12]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1310853430.

Council of Science Editors:

Kitchen SL. Preferences of Patronage in the Portraits of Cosimo I de' Medici. [Masters Thesis]. Kent State University; 2011. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=kent1310853430

2. Proctor, Anne E. Vincenzo Danti and the Medici court : constructing professional identity in late Renaissance Florence.

Degree: PhD, Art History, 2013, University of Texas – Austin

Vincenzo Danti (1530-1576), Perugian by birth and training, relocated to Florence in 1557 to work for the Medici court. While there, Danti completed visual and textual works oriented to the interests of Duke Cosimo I de’ Medici (1519-1574) and his son, Prince Francesco (1541-1587). Danti also participated in the literary and arts academies that were associated with the ducal program of establishing Florentine cultural supremacy. Danti’s multi-disciplinary activities during his tenure at the Medici court demonstrate his hopes to secure long-term patronage and to become the primary sculptor to the Medici dukes. This project represents both a reappraisal of Vincenzo Danti’s career and an examination of the ways that artists at the Medici court positioned themselves in relationship to their patrons and to one another. Advisors/Committee Members: Waldman, Louis Alexander (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Vincenzo Danti; Giorgio Vasari; Medici; Florence; Renaissance; Sculpture; Academies

…List of Figures Figure 1: Vincenzo Danti, Julius III, 1552-1555, south side of the… …293 Figure 4: Vincenzo Danti, Honor Conquering Deceit, Museo Nazionale del Bargello… …Vincenzo Danti, Honor Conquering Deceit, Museo Nazionale del Bargello, Florence… …300 Figure 11: Vincenzo Danti, Moses and the Brazen Serpent, 1559, Museo Nazionale del… …302 Figure 13: Vincenzo Danti, "Sportello” (Bronze safe door), 1559-1560… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Proctor, A. E. (2013). Vincenzo Danti and the Medici court : constructing professional identity in late Renaissance Florence. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/25889

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Proctor, Anne E. “Vincenzo Danti and the Medici court : constructing professional identity in late Renaissance Florence.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed November 12, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/25889.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Proctor, Anne E. “Vincenzo Danti and the Medici court : constructing professional identity in late Renaissance Florence.” 2013. Web. 12 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Proctor AE. Vincenzo Danti and the Medici court : constructing professional identity in late Renaissance Florence. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2013. [cited 2019 Nov 12]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/25889.

Council of Science Editors:

Proctor AE. Vincenzo Danti and the Medici court : constructing professional identity in late Renaissance Florence. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/25889

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