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You searched for subject:(Vibratory gyroscopes). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of California – Irvine

1. Senkal, Doruk. Micro-glassblowing Paradigm for Realization of Rate Integrating Gyroscopes.

Degree: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 2015, University of California – Irvine

This Ph.D. dissertation reports novel fabrication processes and architectures for implementation of Rate Integrating Gyroscopes at micro-scale. Majority of the focus is directed towards development of a surface tension and pressure driven micro-glassblowing paradigm, which is envisioned to serve as an enabling mechanism for wafer-scale fabrication of 3-D micro-wineglass gyroscopes. New 2-D silicon Micro Rate Integrating Gyroscope (MRIG) architectures are also explored to bridge the gap between conventional micro-machining techniques and micro-glassblowing processes, and to serve as a test platform for various MRIG control strategies. Closed loop Whole Angle operation of these 2-D silicon MRIG architectures is presented to identify some of the control challenges associated with MRIG control, such as energy pumping and suppression of errors caused by structural imperfections.The main contribution of the thesis is the development of a high temperature (1700 °C) micro-glassblowing process for fabrication of highly symmetric and low internal dissipation 3-D fused silica wineglass resonators. Owing to the "self-healing'" properties of surface tension and pressure driven micro-glassblowing paradigm, and the low internal loss fused silica material, quality factors above 1 million and frequency splits less than 1 Hz have been demonstrated. In addition to a multi-purpose test-bed for micro-wineglass characterization, in-situ electrode structures with sub 10 micron capacitive gaps are reported for electrostatic transduction.In order to streamline the realization of MRIG control strategies, two new Si-MEMS MRIG architectures were also developed as a part of this thesis: Toroidal Ring Gyroscope (TRG) and Dual Foucault Pendulum (DFP) Gyroscope. Toroidal Ring Gyroscope consists of an outer anchor, concentric ring suspension system, and inner electrode assembly. Q-factors above 100,000 were obtained with this architecture at a compact size of 1760 micron. First demonstration of a parametrically driven MRIG is also reported as a part of this work, showing better than 20 ppm scale factor stability at 360 °/s rate input. Dual Foucault Pendulum (DFP) architecture is a conventionally machined lumped mass Micro Rate Integrating Gyroscope implemented using in-house silicon-on-insulator technology. It is believed that this two mass DFP architecture is the minimal realization of a dynamically balanced, lumped mass MRIG.Finally, a custom, multi-purpose FPGA/DSP based control system was developed to demonstrate interchangeable rate and rate integrating mechanization of micro-scale gyroscope architectures developed in this thesis. Continuous Rate Integrating Gyroscope operation is demonstrated, by electronically compensating structural imperfections via control loops, such as Phase Locked Loop (PLL), Amplitude Gain Control (AGC), quadrature null loop, and closed-loop parametric drive.

Subjects/Keywords: Mechanical engineering; Electrical engineering; Coriolis Vibratory Gyroscopes; Fused Silica; Microelectromechanical Systems; Micro-glassblowing; Micro-wineglass Gyroscopes; Rate Integrating Gyroscopes

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Senkal, D. (2015). Micro-glassblowing Paradigm for Realization of Rate Integrating Gyroscopes. (Thesis). University of California – Irvine. Retrieved from http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/46k9380z

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Senkal, Doruk. “Micro-glassblowing Paradigm for Realization of Rate Integrating Gyroscopes.” 2015. Thesis, University of California – Irvine. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/46k9380z.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Senkal, Doruk. “Micro-glassblowing Paradigm for Realization of Rate Integrating Gyroscopes.” 2015. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Senkal D. Micro-glassblowing Paradigm for Realization of Rate Integrating Gyroscopes. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of California – Irvine; 2015. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/46k9380z.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Senkal D. Micro-glassblowing Paradigm for Realization of Rate Integrating Gyroscopes. [Thesis]. University of California – Irvine; 2015. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/46k9380z

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Georgia Tech

2. Zaman, Mohammad Faisal. Degree-per-hour mode-matched micromachined silicon vibratory gyroscopes.

Degree: PhD, Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2008, Georgia Tech

The objective of this research dissertation is to design and implement two novel micromachined silicon vibratory gyroscopes, which attempt to incorporate all the necessary attributes of sub-deg/hr noise performance requirements in a single framework: large resonant mass, high drive-mode oscillation amplitudes, large device capacitance (coupled with optimized electronics), and high-Q resonant mode-matched operation. Mode-matching leverages the high-Q (mechanical gain) of the operating modes of the gyroscope and offers significant improvements in mechanical and electronic noise floor, sensitivity, and bias stability. The first micromachined silicon vibratory gyroscope presented in this work is the resonating star gyroscope (RSG): a novel Class-II shell-type structure which utilizes degenerate flexural modes. After an iterative cycle of design optimization, an RSG prototype was implemented using a multiple-shell approach on (111) SOI substrate. Experimental data indicates sub-5 deg/hr Allan deviation bias instability operating under a mode-matched operating Q of 30,000 at 23ºC (in vacuum). The second micromachined silicon vibratory gyroscope presented in this work is the mode-matched tuning fork gyroscope (M2-TFG): a novel Class-I tuning fork structure which utilizes in-plane non-degenerate resonant flexural modes. Operated under vacuum, the M2-TFG represents the first reported high-Q perfectly mode-matched operation in Class-I vibratory microgyroscope. Experimental results of device implemented on (100) SOI substrate demonstrates sub-deg/hr Allan deviation bias instability operating under a mode-matched operating Q of 50,000 at 23ºC. In an effort to increase capacitive aspect ratio, a new fabrication technology was developed that involved the selective deposition of doped-polysilicon inside the capacitive sensing gaps (SPD Process). By preserving the structural composition integrity of the flexural springs, it is possible to accurately predict the operating-mode frequencies while maintaining high-Q operation. Preliminary characterization of vacuum-packaged prototypes was performed. Initial results demonstrated high-Q mode-matched operation, excellent thermal stability, and sub-deg/hr Allan variance bias instability. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Farrokh Ayazi (Committee Chair), Dr. Mark G. Allen (Committee Member), Dr. Oliver Brand (Committee Member), Dr. Paul A. Kohl (Committee Member), Dr. Thomas E. Michaels (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: SOI; Silicon micromachining; Vibratory gyroscopes; Mode-matching; High-Q; Gyroscopes; Damping (Mechanics); Vibration; Silicon; Micromachining

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zaman, M. F. (2008). Degree-per-hour mode-matched micromachined silicon vibratory gyroscopes. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/28168

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zaman, Mohammad Faisal. “Degree-per-hour mode-matched micromachined silicon vibratory gyroscopes.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/28168.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zaman, Mohammad Faisal. “Degree-per-hour mode-matched micromachined silicon vibratory gyroscopes.” 2008. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Zaman MF. Degree-per-hour mode-matched micromachined silicon vibratory gyroscopes. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/28168.

Council of Science Editors:

Zaman MF. Degree-per-hour mode-matched micromachined silicon vibratory gyroscopes. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/28168

3. Mayberry, Curtis Lee. Interface circuits for readout and control of a micro-hemispherical resonating gyroscope.

Degree: MS, Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2014, Georgia Tech

Gyroscopes are inertial sensors that measure the rate or angle of rotation. One of the most promising technologies for reaching a high-performance MEMS gyroscope has been development of the micro-hemispherical shell resonator. (μHSR) This thesis presents the electronic control and read-out interface that has been developed to turn the μHSR into a fully functional micro-hemispherical resonating gyroscope (μHRG) capable of measuring the rate of rotation. First, the μHSR was characterized, which both enabled the design of the interface and led to new insights into the linearity and feed-through characteristics of the μHSR. Then a detailed analysis of the rate mode interface including calculations and simulations was performed. This interface was then implemented on custom printed circuit boards for both the analog front-end and analog back-end, along with a custom on-board vacuum chamber and chassis to house the μHSR and interface electronics. Finally the performance of the rate mode gyroscope interface was characterized, showing a linear scale factor of 8.57 mv/deg/s, an angle random walk (ARW) of 34 deg/sqrt(hr) and a bias instability of 330 deg/hr. Advisors/Committee Members: Ayazi, Farokh (advisor), Ghovanloo, Maysam (committee member), Wang, Hua (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: uHRG; µHRG; MEMS; CVG; Coriolis; TIA; AM; FM; Micro-hemispherical resonating gyroscope; 3D-HARPSS; High-Q; Gyroscopes; Gyroscopic instruments; Gyroscope; Vibratory; Coriolis vibratory gyroscope; Interface; Circuits; Transimpedance amplifier; Rate integrating; Inertial sensor; Sensor; Oscillator; Analog; Control; Electrostatic; Capacitive; Noise; Characterization; Mode-matching; Wine-glass; Duffing; Non-linearity; Feed-through cancellation; Vibratory gyroscopes; Polysilicon

…Background 1.2.1 Gyroscope History The very first Coriolis vibratory gyroscopes were not made by… …stabilization. [18] These vibratory gyroscopes consist of a pair of appendages known as… …x5D; gyroscopes and macro-scale Coriolis vibratory gyroscopes (CVG) [24]… …4 TABLE 2: BIAS STABILITY PERFORMANCE OF MACRO-SCALE GYROSCOPES [23, 26]… …PERFORMANCE GYROSCOPES. ASTRIX 120 AND ASTRIX 200 ARE TWO DIFFERENT MODELS OF FOG. [26]… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mayberry, C. L. (2014). Interface circuits for readout and control of a micro-hemispherical resonating gyroscope. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/53116

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mayberry, Curtis Lee. “Interface circuits for readout and control of a micro-hemispherical resonating gyroscope.” 2014. Masters Thesis, Georgia Tech. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/53116.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mayberry, Curtis Lee. “Interface circuits for readout and control of a micro-hemispherical resonating gyroscope.” 2014. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Mayberry CL. Interface circuits for readout and control of a micro-hemispherical resonating gyroscope. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2014. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/53116.

Council of Science Editors:

Mayberry CL. Interface circuits for readout and control of a micro-hemispherical resonating gyroscope. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/53116

.