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You searched for subject:(Vegetarianism Health aspects). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Loma Linda University

1. Griffith, Lisa Delia. Effects of Consuming Beans Before or With a Meal on Satiety and Gastrointestinal Hormones Concentration in Obese Men and Women.

Degree: DrPH, Nutrition, 2012, Loma Linda University

Background: Consuming beans and staggering meals may control energy intake. We examined the effect of consuming 0.5 cup of beans 15 minutes before a meal on gastrointestinal (GI) peptides concentrations in obese men and women. Methods: A randomized crossover design was used to measure GI peptides response to two test meals in 28 healthy obese adults. Subjects consumed a standardized breakfast meal on each test day followed by one of two test meals: a meal incorporating 0.5 cup of beans (control bean meal), and an isocaloric meal (staggered bean meal) in which 0.5 cup of beans was consumed 15 minutes before the meal. Blood samples were obtained prior and at 30, 60, and 120 minutes following the consumption of the test meals and analyzed for unacylated ghrelin, acylated ghrelin, peptide YY, glucagon-like peptide and oxyntomodulin by ELISA. Visual analog scale for feelings of hunger and feelings of fullness were recorded at each blood draw. Dietary recalls were completed using Nutrition Data System for Research (NDS-R). The area under the curve (AUC) was compared using t-tests. Results: The AUC30-120 for postprandial hormone GLP-1 was higher for the control bean meal compared to the control meal (P=0.03). AUC30-120 for the other postprandial hormones, insulin, glucose and subjective responses showed no statistical difference between the control bean meal and staggered bean meal. Subsequent meal intake was lower after staggered bean meal, however, the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Incorporating beans and staggering meals may be useful in conjunction with behavioral modification techniques to help with weight control and reduce energy intake. Advisors/Committee Members: Ella Haddad, Joan Sabaté, Serena Tonstad.

Subjects/Keywords: Gastroenterology; Nutrition; Preventive Medicine; Obesity  – Prevention; Gastrointestinal hormones; Appetite  – Physiological aspects; Beans  – Nutrition; Diet  – Health aspects; Vegetarianism; Obesity  – prevention and control; Gastrointestinal Hormones; Legumes; Appetite Regulation  – physiology; Diet, Vegetarian; Nutrition Assessment.

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APA (6th Edition):

Griffith, L. D. (2012). Effects of Consuming Beans Before or With a Meal on Satiety and Gastrointestinal Hormones Concentration in Obese Men and Women. (Thesis). Loma Linda University. Retrieved from https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/861

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Griffith, Lisa Delia. “Effects of Consuming Beans Before or With a Meal on Satiety and Gastrointestinal Hormones Concentration in Obese Men and Women.” 2012. Thesis, Loma Linda University. Accessed September 28, 2020. https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/861.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Griffith, Lisa Delia. “Effects of Consuming Beans Before or With a Meal on Satiety and Gastrointestinal Hormones Concentration in Obese Men and Women.” 2012. Web. 28 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Griffith LD. Effects of Consuming Beans Before or With a Meal on Satiety and Gastrointestinal Hormones Concentration in Obese Men and Women. [Internet] [Thesis]. Loma Linda University; 2012. [cited 2020 Sep 28]. Available from: https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/861.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Griffith LD. Effects of Consuming Beans Before or With a Meal on Satiety and Gastrointestinal Hormones Concentration in Obese Men and Women. [Thesis]. Loma Linda University; 2012. Available from: https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/861

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Eastern Michigan University

2. Farmer, Bonnie. Comparison of nutrient intakes for vegetarians, non-vegetarians, and dieters: Results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004.

Degree: MS, Health Sciences, 2009, Eastern Michigan University

Studies showing lower body mass index for vegetarians than non-vegetarians suggest that a vegetarian diet may be an approach for weight management. The purpose of this study was to compare nutrient intakes of vegetarians, non-vegetarians, and dieters to show that a vegetarian diet does not compromise nutrient intake. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999-2004) data were analyzed for persons 19 years of age and older. Vegetarians were those who did not report eating meat, poultry, or fish. Dieters were those who consumed 500 kilocalories less than estimated energy requirements. Adjusted means for fiber, vitamins E, A, and C, thiamin, riboflavin, folate, calcium, magnesium, iron, and potassium were higher for vegetarians than for non-vegetarians. Niacin, vitamin B12, and zinc were lower for the vegetarians; however, only zinc was below the Recommended Dietary Allowance. These findings suggest that a vegetarian diet can be recommended for weight management without compromising nutrient intake. Advisors/Committee Members: George Liepa PhD, FACN, FAOCS, Chair, Alice Jo Rainville, PhD, RD, Brian Larson, PhD.

Subjects/Keywords: Nutrition Evaluation; Vegetarianism Health aspects; Body mass index; Dietetics and Clinical Nutrition; Medicine and Health Sciences

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Farmer, B. (2009). Comparison of nutrient intakes for vegetarians, non-vegetarians, and dieters: Results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004. (Masters Thesis). Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved from https://commons.emich.edu/theses/150

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Farmer, Bonnie. “Comparison of nutrient intakes for vegetarians, non-vegetarians, and dieters: Results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004.” 2009. Masters Thesis, Eastern Michigan University. Accessed September 28, 2020. https://commons.emich.edu/theses/150.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Farmer, Bonnie. “Comparison of nutrient intakes for vegetarians, non-vegetarians, and dieters: Results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004.” 2009. Web. 28 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Farmer B. Comparison of nutrient intakes for vegetarians, non-vegetarians, and dieters: Results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Eastern Michigan University; 2009. [cited 2020 Sep 28]. Available from: https://commons.emich.edu/theses/150.

Council of Science Editors:

Farmer B. Comparison of nutrient intakes for vegetarians, non-vegetarians, and dieters: Results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004. [Masters Thesis]. Eastern Michigan University; 2009. Available from: https://commons.emich.edu/theses/150


Loma Linda University

3. Liao, Wen-Ling. The Effects of Physical Activity and Nutrient Intake on the Risk of Hip Fracture : Results From The Adventist Health Study-2.

Degree: DrPH, 2009, Loma Linda University

This is a two year of follow up study of Adventist Health Study-2 (AHS-2). We assessed the association between physical activity, nutrient intake and risk of hip fracture among peri- and post menopausal Caucasian women using unconditional logistic regression models. All subjects completed a lifestyle questionnaire which including information of physical activity and frequency and portion size of food intake at enrollment into the study (2002-2007). The “Bi-Annual Hospitalization History” questionnaire which included a question about hip fractures due to minor trauma/falls was sent to subjects approximately two years after enrollment, with a response rat of 82.84%. In this cohort, a total of 151 new cases of hip fracture occurred among 25,398 peri- and post- menopausal women aged 45 or older during the 55, 313 person years of follow-up period giving an incidence rate of 273 per 100,000 person-years and 282 per 100,000 person years after direct age-adjustment (using the US 2000 female white population). There was a dose response inverse relationship between level of regular walking, running and jogging and hip fracture with 64% reduction of risk for those who reported walking more than 5 miles per week compared to those with less than 2.5 miles per week or no regular exercise. The risk of hip fracture was inversely associated with dairy food intake [OR = 0.86 (95% Cl: 0.39, 1.90) and OR = 0.70 (95% Cl: 0.35, 1.41), respectively, for intake of 2-/wk and 7+times/wk vs./wk]. Similarly, those in the highest tertile of dairy source protein (10.47+ g/day), experienced a clear lowering in hip fracture risk compared to those in the lowest tertile (< 4.31 g/day) of dairy source protein (OR=0.39 (95% Cl: 0.16, 0.98). Dairy protein showed an independent protective effect on hip fracture after adjusting for total protein and dietary calcium. In summary, our findings suggest that a regular walking program of at least 5 miles per week and dairy protein consumption lower the risk the hip fracture in this study population. Advisors/Committee Members: Synnove Knutsen, W. Lawrence Beeson, Donna Gregory Thorpe.

Subjects/Keywords: Clinical Trials; Epidemiology; Human and Clinical Nutrition; Hip Fractures  – diagnosis; Hip Fractures  – epidemiology; Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal  – physiopathology; Bone Density; Body Mass Index; Nutritional Support; Dietary Proteins  – administration & dosage; Health Behavior; Physical Fitness; Vegetarianism  – Religious aspects  – Seventh-day Adventists; Nutrition  – Religious aspects  – Seventh-day Adventists; Caucasian Race; Prospective Studies.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Liao, W. (2009). The Effects of Physical Activity and Nutrient Intake on the Risk of Hip Fracture : Results From The Adventist Health Study-2. (Thesis). Loma Linda University. Retrieved from https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/900

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Liao, Wen-Ling. “The Effects of Physical Activity and Nutrient Intake on the Risk of Hip Fracture : Results From The Adventist Health Study-2.” 2009. Thesis, Loma Linda University. Accessed September 28, 2020. https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/900.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Liao, Wen-Ling. “The Effects of Physical Activity and Nutrient Intake on the Risk of Hip Fracture : Results From The Adventist Health Study-2.” 2009. Web. 28 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Liao W. The Effects of Physical Activity and Nutrient Intake on the Risk of Hip Fracture : Results From The Adventist Health Study-2. [Internet] [Thesis]. Loma Linda University; 2009. [cited 2020 Sep 28]. Available from: https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/900.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Liao W. The Effects of Physical Activity and Nutrient Intake on the Risk of Hip Fracture : Results From The Adventist Health Study-2. [Thesis]. Loma Linda University; 2009. Available from: https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/900

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.