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You searched for subject:(Vascular fluorescence imaging). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Texas – Austin

1. Davis, Mitchell Alan. Three dimensional simulation of functional neuro-vascular imaging.

Degree: PhD, Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2014, University of Texas – Austin

Functional optical imaging has become a powerful tool for measuring physiological parameters in the brain without disrupting normal physiology. Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) has been shown to allow near real time mapping of oxygen tension in plasma (pO2), and Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging (LSCI) has been demonstrated to provide qualitative assessments of blood flow in the cortex. However, as both of these methods provide physiological parameters based on the spatial sampling of photons arriving at a detector, it is crucially important to understand either where the photons originated, in the case of FLIM, or which moving particles the photons have sampled, in the case of LSCI. Traditionally, these questions have been difficult to solve because of the heterogeneity of the distribution of particles which contribute to the measured signal. In both FLIM and LSCI, for example, only the light which samples the intravascular space will contribute to the signal. While analytical methods have proven to be successful at predicting the imaging depth of homogeneous materials, they are not able to predict imaging depth when measuring a fluorophore or a moving particle that is only present inside blood vessels. Unlike analytical methods, numerical methods can be used to approximate light propagation in an arbitrary geometry. While both deterministic and stochastic models of light propagation can, and have been, successfully employed to determine light fluence in an arbitrary geometry, deterministic methods are not well suited to the task of simulating light propagation in large volumes of turbid media. For this reason, three dimensional Monte Carlo simulations of light propagation combined with high resolution vascular anatomy were used to directly simulate FLIM and LSCI in the brain. Using these simulations, the imaging depth, degree of multiple scattering, and sensitivity of LSCI and FLIM to physiological changes were determined. Advisors/Committee Members: Dunn, Andrew Kenneth, 1970- (advisor), Pearce, John (committee member), Thomas, Robert (committee member), Tunnell, James (committee member), Ling, Hao (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Laser-tissue interactions; Vascular fluorescence imaging; Speckle contrast imaging; Dynamic light scattering; Blood flow imaging

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APA (6th Edition):

Davis, M. A. (2014). Three dimensional simulation of functional neuro-vascular imaging. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/38225

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Davis, Mitchell Alan. “Three dimensional simulation of functional neuro-vascular imaging.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed January 21, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/38225.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Davis, Mitchell Alan. “Three dimensional simulation of functional neuro-vascular imaging.” 2014. Web. 21 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Davis MA. Three dimensional simulation of functional neuro-vascular imaging. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2014. [cited 2021 Jan 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/38225.

Council of Science Editors:

Davis MA. Three dimensional simulation of functional neuro-vascular imaging. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/38225


Virginia Tech

2. Gurjarpadhye, Abhijit Achyut. Dynamic Non-Destructive Monitoring of Bioengineered Blood Vessel Development  within a Bioreactor using Multi-Modality Imaging.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2013, Virginia Tech

Regenerative medicine involves formation of tissue or organ for replacement of a wounded or dysfunctional tissue. Healthy cells extracted from the patient are expanded and are seeded on a three-dimensional biodegradable scaffold. The structure is then placed in a bioreactor and is provided with nutrients for the cells, which proliferate and migrate throughout the scaffold to eventually form a desired to tissue that can be transplanted into the patient\'s body.  Inability to monitor this complex process of regeneration in real-time makes control and optimization of this process extremely difficult. Histology, the gold standard used for tissue structural assessment, is a static technique that only provides "snapshots" of the progress and requires the specimen to be sacrificed. This inefficiency severely limits our understanding of the biological processes associated with tissue growth during the in vitro pre-conditioning phase. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) enables imaging of cross sectional structure in biological tissues by measuring the echo time delay of backreflected light. OCT has recently emerged as an important method to assess the structures of physiological, pathological as well as tissue engineered blood vessels. The goal of the present study is to develop an imaging system for non-destructive monitoring of blood vessels maturing within a bioreactor. Non-destructive structural imaging of tissue-engineered blood vessels cultured in a novel bioreactor was performed using free-space and catheter-based OCT imaging, while monitoring of the endothelium development was performed using a fluorescence imaging system that utilizes a commercial OCT catheter. The project included execution of three specific aims. Firstly, we developed OCT instrumentation to determine geometrical and optical properties of porcine and human skin in real-time. The purpose of the second aim was to assess structural development of tissue-engineered blood vessels maturing in a bioreactor. We constructed a novel quartz-based bioreactor that will permit free space and catheter-based OCT imaging of vascular grafts. The grafts were made of biodegradable PCL-collagen and seeded with multipotent mesenchymal cells. We imaged the maturing grafts over 30 days to assess changes in graft wall thickness. We also monitored change in optical properties of the grafts based on free-space OCT scanning.   Finally, in order to visualize the proliferation of endothelial cells and development of the endothelium, we developed an imaging system that utilizes a commercial OCT catheter for single-cell-level imaging of the growing endothelium of a tissue-engineered blood vessel. We have developed two modules of an imaging system for non-destructive monitoring of maturing bioengineered vascular grafts. The first module provides the ability to non-destructively examine the structure of the grafts while the second module can track the progress of endothelialization. As both modules use the same endoscope for imaging, when operated in… Advisors/Committee Members: Rylander, Christopher G. (committeechair), Rylander, M Nichole (committee member), Wang, Ge (committee member), Soker, Shay (committee member), Xu, Yong (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Optical Coherence Tomography; Fluorescence Imaging; Vascular Grafts; Bioreactor; Non-destructive

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gurjarpadhye, A. A. (2013). Dynamic Non-Destructive Monitoring of Bioengineered Blood Vessel Development  within a Bioreactor using Multi-Modality Imaging. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/51359

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gurjarpadhye, Abhijit Achyut. “Dynamic Non-Destructive Monitoring of Bioengineered Blood Vessel Development  within a Bioreactor using Multi-Modality Imaging.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed January 21, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/51359.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gurjarpadhye, Abhijit Achyut. “Dynamic Non-Destructive Monitoring of Bioengineered Blood Vessel Development  within a Bioreactor using Multi-Modality Imaging.” 2013. Web. 21 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Gurjarpadhye AA. Dynamic Non-Destructive Monitoring of Bioengineered Blood Vessel Development  within a Bioreactor using Multi-Modality Imaging. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2013. [cited 2021 Jan 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/51359.

Council of Science Editors:

Gurjarpadhye AA. Dynamic Non-Destructive Monitoring of Bioengineered Blood Vessel Development  within a Bioreactor using Multi-Modality Imaging. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/51359

3. Μπέλλου, Σοφία. Μοριακοί μηχανισμοί της αγγειογένεσης: γονιδιακή ρύθμιση από τον αγγειογενετικό παράγοντα VEGF στα ενδοθηλιακά κύτταρα: Σοφία Μπέλλου.

Degree: 2008, University of Ioannina; Πανεπιστήμιο Ιωαννίνων

Subjects/Keywords: Αγγειογένεση; Κινάσες ενεργοποιημένες από μιτογόνο; Φωσφατάση διπλής εξειδίκευσης; Ανθρώπινα ενδοθηλιακά κύτταρα ομφάλιου λώρου; Φασματοσκοπία σχετικού συσχετισμού φθορισμού; Απεικόνιση χρόνου ζωής φθορισμού; Angiogenesis; Mitogen activated protein kinases (MARKS); Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF); Dual specificity phosphatase; Human umbilical vein endothelial cells; Fluorescence cross correlation spectroscopy; Fluorescence lifetime imaging

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Μπέλλου, . . (2008). Μοριακοί μηχανισμοί της αγγειογένεσης: γονιδιακή ρύθμιση από τον αγγειογενετικό παράγοντα VEGF στα ενδοθηλιακά κύτταρα: Σοφία Μπέλλου. (Thesis). University of Ioannina; Πανεπιστήμιο Ιωαννίνων. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10442/hedi/21314

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Μπέλλου, Σοφία. “Μοριακοί μηχανισμοί της αγγειογένεσης: γονιδιακή ρύθμιση από τον αγγειογενετικό παράγοντα VEGF στα ενδοθηλιακά κύτταρα: Σοφία Μπέλλου.” 2008. Thesis, University of Ioannina; Πανεπιστήμιο Ιωαννίνων. Accessed January 21, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10442/hedi/21314.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Μπέλλου, Σοφία. “Μοριακοί μηχανισμοί της αγγειογένεσης: γονιδιακή ρύθμιση από τον αγγειογενετικό παράγοντα VEGF στα ενδοθηλιακά κύτταρα: Σοφία Μπέλλου.” 2008. Web. 21 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Μπέλλου . Μοριακοί μηχανισμοί της αγγειογένεσης: γονιδιακή ρύθμιση από τον αγγειογενετικό παράγοντα VEGF στα ενδοθηλιακά κύτταρα: Σοφία Μπέλλου. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Ioannina; Πανεπιστήμιο Ιωαννίνων; 2008. [cited 2021 Jan 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10442/hedi/21314.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Μπέλλου . Μοριακοί μηχανισμοί της αγγειογένεσης: γονιδιακή ρύθμιση από τον αγγειογενετικό παράγοντα VEGF στα ενδοθηλιακά κύτταρα: Σοφία Μπέλλου. [Thesis]. University of Ioannina; Πανεπιστήμιο Ιωαννίνων; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10442/hedi/21314

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.