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You searched for subject:(Used Batteries). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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NSYSU

1. Chen, Min-Jui. Applying Used Electric Vehicle Battery in DC Microgrid Operations.

Degree: Master, Electrical Engineering, 2013, NSYSU

Power system may fail or go unstable due to either man-made or natural reasons. Some of the reliability problems can be solved by implementing distributed energy generator, such as solar photovoltaic and wind farm in the grid. Using high capacity energy storage system with renewable generator is an effective but expensive approach. In order to reduce the investment cost of energy storage system, used EV batteries are proposed. Once batteries have reached the end of their useful life in vehicles, at around 70% to 80% of initial capacity, placing them into a localized energy storage system will extend their lifetime usage and further reduce the cost on distributed generators integration. In this thesis, an isolated DC power system including solar photovoltaic and used EV batteries is investigated. Batteries with different state of health (SOH) would have different power capacity. Discharging rates of multiple batteries with different SOH are investigated in order to achieve the largest energy output or highest efficiency of storage system. Using the obtained battery discharging ratios, the parameters in the proposed DC microgrid droop control can be obtained. Dynamic simulations of the DC microgrid operations are presented. Advisors/Committee Members: Ching-Tsai Pan (chair), Sheng-Nian Yeh (chair), Chang-Huan Liu (chair), Chan-Nan Lu (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Used EV batteries; SOH; Second life of batteries; Islanding; DC microgrid

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APA (6th Edition):

Chen, M. (2013). Applying Used Electric Vehicle Battery in DC Microgrid Operations. (Thesis). NSYSU. Retrieved from http://etd.lib.nsysu.edu.tw/ETD-db/ETD-search/view_etd?URN=etd-0809113-131326

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chen, Min-Jui. “Applying Used Electric Vehicle Battery in DC Microgrid Operations.” 2013. Thesis, NSYSU. Accessed September 22, 2017. http://etd.lib.nsysu.edu.tw/ETD-db/ETD-search/view_etd?URN=etd-0809113-131326.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chen, Min-Jui. “Applying Used Electric Vehicle Battery in DC Microgrid Operations.” 2013. Web. 22 Sep 2017.

Vancouver:

Chen M. Applying Used Electric Vehicle Battery in DC Microgrid Operations. [Internet] [Thesis]. NSYSU; 2013. [cited 2017 Sep 22]. Available from: http://etd.lib.nsysu.edu.tw/ETD-db/ETD-search/view_etd?URN=etd-0809113-131326.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Chen M. Applying Used Electric Vehicle Battery in DC Microgrid Operations. [Thesis]. NSYSU; 2013. Available from: http://etd.lib.nsysu.edu.tw/ETD-db/ETD-search/view_etd?URN=etd-0809113-131326

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


NSYSU

2. Huang, Jhao-Ming. Charging and Discharging Strategies of Second Life Battery in Energy Storage System.

Degree: Master, Electrical Engineering, 2017, NSYSU

Battery storage systems play an important role in integrating renewable energy into the grid, however they are less popular due to their high initial cost. When the state-of-health (SOH) of the batteries in Electric Vehicle (EV) are lower than 80%, they are not suitable for EVs. But, they still can be used in energy storage applications. If the used EV batteries could be utilized in battery storage system, it can significantly reduce the initial cost of storage system. In this thesis, a power optimizer concept is introduced to manage the batteries with varying levels of SOH and state-of-charge (SOC). The charging & discharging currents of individual battery packs are controlled to deliver the optimal power and energy capacity of the whole battery energy system. Study results indicate that using the proposed charging and discharging strategies, it can reduce the initial cost of storage system and increase use value of the batteries. Advisors/Committee Members: Min-Siong Liang (chair), Chin-Sien Moo (chair), Kin-Cheong Sou (chair), Chan-Nan Lu (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Battery Storage System; Electric Vehicle; Used Batteries; Power Optimizer; Charging and Discharging Strategies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Huang, J. (2017). Charging and Discharging Strategies of Second Life Battery in Energy Storage System. (Thesis). NSYSU. Retrieved from http://etd.lib.nsysu.edu.tw/ETD-db/ETD-search/view_etd?URN=etd-0805117-134039

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Huang, Jhao-Ming. “Charging and Discharging Strategies of Second Life Battery in Energy Storage System.” 2017. Thesis, NSYSU. Accessed September 22, 2017. http://etd.lib.nsysu.edu.tw/ETD-db/ETD-search/view_etd?URN=etd-0805117-134039.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Huang, Jhao-Ming. “Charging and Discharging Strategies of Second Life Battery in Energy Storage System.” 2017. Web. 22 Sep 2017.

Vancouver:

Huang J. Charging and Discharging Strategies of Second Life Battery in Energy Storage System. [Internet] [Thesis]. NSYSU; 2017. [cited 2017 Sep 22]. Available from: http://etd.lib.nsysu.edu.tw/ETD-db/ETD-search/view_etd?URN=etd-0805117-134039.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Huang J. Charging and Discharging Strategies of Second Life Battery in Energy Storage System. [Thesis]. NSYSU; 2017. Available from: http://etd.lib.nsysu.edu.tw/ETD-db/ETD-search/view_etd?URN=etd-0805117-134039

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Warner, Nicholas A. Secondary Life of Automotive Lithium Ion Batteries: An Aging and Economic Analysis.

Degree: MS, Mechanical Engineering, 2013, The Ohio State University

As electric vehicles continue to penetrate the automotive market, so too will an influx of used cells no longer suitable for vehicles but potentially prime for second use in grid storage applications. Since these cells may maintain a high percentage (70-80%) of the original capacity, they may also possess some economic value that could offset the current high cost of electric vehicles. This thesis studied the degradation of second use cells from automotive applications when continuing to be used on an anticipated electric grid cycle developed from existing economically ideal and real world. From this degradation, a simple economic analysis was performed. Though economic analysis has been performed previously, it was based on speculation of anticipated costs and degradation. This study however appears to be the first to estimate degradation rates from experimentation.The project began with the procurement of batteries which had reached automotive End of Life (EoL). Concurrently, aging profiles based on economically optimized models and actual regulation data from PJM were developed. These profiles were built so as to accurately simulate an anticipated year of use in a Community Energy Storage (CES) system. These profiles were then scaled to accelerate the aging process while maintaining total amp-hour throughput. In addition to this accelerated aging—which was done at anticipated ambient conditions for Columbus, Ohio—characterization assessment was performed before, during, and after aging via resistance and capacity testing. In-situ resistance measurements were also made during aging testing via carefully inserted resistance pulses within the aging profiles. This degradation information was post processed and then aggregated together to assess the overall rate of battery degradation. The in-situ tracking of resistance growth showed that such measurements are viable alternatives to otherwise intrusive resistance measurement testing, as a high number of samples properly processed can yield results with similar confidence to the more intrusive testing without the need to halt field operations. In addition to resistance growth tracking, the capacity degradation was also tracked and the data was used to predict the potential remaining life in the second use cells to determine their potential for storage on the grid and their economic value relative to new batteries.The experiment ultimately determined that under certain economic conditions, second use cells may prove a viable option for CES systems, this may frequently require an additional economic discount in addition to the proportion of their remaining capacity. As this work is the first of its kind, additional work should be done to more thoroughly assess the potential degradation of cells in a more narrow power (acceleration) range; ideally, 1-3x the rated capacity. In addition, work should be continued to determine the economic and practical viability of re-purposing used battery packs. Advisors/Committee Members: Mildam-Mohler, Shawn (Advisor), Guezennec, Yann (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Electrical Engineering; Mechanical Engineering; Battery Second Life; Battery Second Use; Community Energy Storage; Used Batteries; Battery Degradation

…these areas, are batteries. Even with increased fossil fuel production in the US, global… …energy density of batteries, electric and hybrid vehicle still exist as niche vehicles… …that the use of batteries on a large scale in transportation and electricity storage are… …scale by the increased production of batteries and introduction of new manufacturers and… …automotive traction batteries will no longer be acceptable for automotive applications once a… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Warner, N. A. (2013). Secondary Life of Automotive Lithium Ion Batteries: An Aging and Economic Analysis. (Masters Thesis). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1366371336

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Warner, Nicholas A. “Secondary Life of Automotive Lithium Ion Batteries: An Aging and Economic Analysis.” 2013. Masters Thesis, The Ohio State University. Accessed September 22, 2017. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1366371336.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Warner, Nicholas A. “Secondary Life of Automotive Lithium Ion Batteries: An Aging and Economic Analysis.” 2013. Web. 22 Sep 2017.

Vancouver:

Warner NA. Secondary Life of Automotive Lithium Ion Batteries: An Aging and Economic Analysis. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2013. [cited 2017 Sep 22]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1366371336.

Council of Science Editors:

Warner NA. Secondary Life of Automotive Lithium Ion Batteries: An Aging and Economic Analysis. [Masters Thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2013. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1366371336

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