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You searched for subject:(Uniola paniculata). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Virginia Commonwealth University

1. Kirschner, Audrey. Planting Density Effects on the Growth of Dune Grasses.

Degree: MS, Biology, 2019, Virginia Commonwealth University

Coastal dune vegetation plays a key role in dune formation and stabilization through sediment trapping and erosion control. To restore degraded dunes, revegetation of dune building species is critical. Planting density has been found to effect growth of marsh species, with closer plantings alleviating stress through facilitation. As coastal dunes are high stress environments, it is expected that dune species may also exhibit facilitative interactions based on the Stress Gradient Hypothesis. Therefore, planting grasses in clumped configurations may lead to more successful dune revegetation. The objective of this research was to determine how planting density affects the growth of two dominant dune grasses along the US Atlantic coast, Ammophila breviligulata and Uniola paniculata, through field surveys of natural distribution, density, and a manipulation study of planting densities. Natural distribution differed between the two species with A. breviligulata occurring at lower dunes and U. paniculata occurring at higher dunes. Ammophila breviligulata occurred more densely than U. paniculata. Planting density of U. paniculata had an effect on growth parameters (shoot length, stem number, and ramet number) but not survival with dispersed plantings (50 cm apart) having higher growth than clumped plantings. The effect of density planting on growth parameters may impact dune building processes. Sparsely planted U. paniculata may have greater sediment capture compared to densely planted U. paniculata due to greater stem number and biomass resulting in taller, steeper dunes. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Julie Zinnert.

Subjects/Keywords: Facilitation; Ammophila breviligulata; Uniola paniculata; Dune; Plant Biology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kirschner, A. (2019). Planting Density Effects on the Growth of Dune Grasses. (Thesis). Virginia Commonwealth University. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.25772/A9GA-Y531 ; https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/6068

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kirschner, Audrey. “Planting Density Effects on the Growth of Dune Grasses.” 2019. Thesis, Virginia Commonwealth University. Accessed March 07, 2021. https://doi.org/10.25772/A9GA-Y531 ; https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/6068.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kirschner, Audrey. “Planting Density Effects on the Growth of Dune Grasses.” 2019. Web. 07 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Kirschner A. Planting Density Effects on the Growth of Dune Grasses. [Internet] [Thesis]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2019. [cited 2021 Mar 07]. Available from: https://doi.org/10.25772/A9GA-Y531 ; https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/6068.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kirschner A. Planting Density Effects on the Growth of Dune Grasses. [Thesis]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2019. Available from: https://doi.org/10.25772/A9GA-Y531 ; https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/6068

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Georgia

2. Gormally, Cara Lynn. Ecological and evolutionary responses of plant populations to the coastal dune environment.

Degree: 2014, University of Georgia

Phenotypic trait variation is ubiquitous among plant populations. Multiple evolutionary and ecological processes may produce trait variation, including divergent selection due to heterogeneous environmental conditions driving local adaptation, phenotypic plasticity, historical genetic structure, genetic drift, and barriers to gene flow. Consequently, disentangling the principal cause driving trait variation is challenging, since multiple processes may result in similar outcomes. Understanding the underlying source of phenotypic trait variation is particularly critical for informing restoration and conservation decisions. Uniola paniculata is a perennial grass that occurs on southeastern U.S. coastal dunes and is federally protected due to its role in stabilizing dune habitats. Across a single dune system, U. paniculata’s range spans a localized environmental gradient from the dynamic dunes closest to the shoreline to the more stabilized dunes farther inland. We characterize the shoreline-to-landward environmental gradient and determine that variation in morphological and physiological traits in U. paniculata mirrors variation in the underlying abiotic conditions in a mensurative field study. We find no evidence that populations are locally adapted to microhabitats along the environmental gradient using reciprocal transplants of individuals from each habitat. We employ a comparative approach using a greenhouse common garden to examine variation in quantitative traits and genetic analyses (allozymes) to examine neutral genetic variation. This study includes populations from four Georgia barrier islands. We find evidence of divergent selection on both aboveground and total biomass which appears to be driven primarily by inter-island differences rather than intra-island differences from habitats along the shoreline-to-landward environmental gradient. Lastly, we explore the genetic structure of a widely dispersed beach annual, Cakile edentula, which is comprised of three subspecies associated with particular geographic distributions. This study has three key findings to contribute to our understanding of C. edentula: genetic diversity (Hep) is fairly low; taxonomic subspecies designations are supported by UPGMA-dendrogram clusters and AMOVA analysis indicating that variation among regions explains 42% of total variation; and pairwise FST estimates suggest that there are significant rates of migration between populations.

Subjects/Keywords: environmental gradients; natural selection; phenotypic plasticity; population genetics; coastal dunes; Uniola paniculata; Cakile edentula.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gormally, C. L. (2014). Ecological and evolutionary responses of plant populations to the coastal dune environment. (Thesis). University of Georgia. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10724/26330

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gormally, Cara Lynn. “Ecological and evolutionary responses of plant populations to the coastal dune environment.” 2014. Thesis, University of Georgia. Accessed March 07, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10724/26330.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gormally, Cara Lynn. “Ecological and evolutionary responses of plant populations to the coastal dune environment.” 2014. Web. 07 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Gormally CL. Ecological and evolutionary responses of plant populations to the coastal dune environment. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Georgia; 2014. [cited 2021 Mar 07]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10724/26330.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Gormally CL. Ecological and evolutionary responses of plant populations to the coastal dune environment. [Thesis]. University of Georgia; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10724/26330

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Virginia Commonwealth University

3. Harris, April. Differential Response of Barrier Island Dune Grasses to Species Interactions and Burial.

Degree: MS, Biology, 2016, Virginia Commonwealth University

Dune grasses are integral to biogeomorphic feedbacks that create and alter foredunes and barrier island stability. In a glasshouse study, Ammophila breviligulata Fern. and Uniola paniculata L. were planted together and subjected to sand burial to quantify morphological and physiological response. Ammophila breviligulata physiological and morphological performance declined when planted with U. paniculata but U. paniculata was not affected when planted with A. breviligulata. Burial had a positive effect on A. breviligulata and U. paniculata as indicated by electron transport rate and total biomass at the end of the experiment. Due to their different growth strategies, A. breviligulata and U. paniculata form continuous versus hummocky dunes, respectively. As global temperatures rise and U. paniculata migrates into A. breviligulata dominated habitat, A. breviligulata performance may diminish, and changes in dune form could result in altered island stability via increased overwash. Foredune community structure could also change due to the shift in dominant species which could alter dune succession. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Julie Zinnert, Dr. Donald Young.

Subjects/Keywords: Ammophila breviligulata; Uniola paniculata; Climate Change; Range Expansion; Virginia Coastal Reserve (VCR); Biogeomorphic Feedbacks; Other Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Harris, A. (2016). Differential Response of Barrier Island Dune Grasses to Species Interactions and Burial. (Thesis). Virginia Commonwealth University. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.25772/9QW5-MD33 ; https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/4097

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Harris, April. “Differential Response of Barrier Island Dune Grasses to Species Interactions and Burial.” 2016. Thesis, Virginia Commonwealth University. Accessed March 07, 2021. https://doi.org/10.25772/9QW5-MD33 ; https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/4097.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Harris, April. “Differential Response of Barrier Island Dune Grasses to Species Interactions and Burial.” 2016. Web. 07 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Harris A. Differential Response of Barrier Island Dune Grasses to Species Interactions and Burial. [Internet] [Thesis]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2016. [cited 2021 Mar 07]. Available from: https://doi.org/10.25772/9QW5-MD33 ; https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/4097.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Harris A. Differential Response of Barrier Island Dune Grasses to Species Interactions and Burial. [Thesis]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2016. Available from: https://doi.org/10.25772/9QW5-MD33 ; https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/4097

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.