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You searched for subject:(Undergraduate Black Males). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Ohio University

1. Ford, Obie, III. “This Is Who I Am:” The Lived Experiences of Black Gay Men With an Undergraduate Degree From a Historically Black College or University.

Degree: PhD, Higher Education (Education), 2007, Ohio University

This is a phenomenological study of the lived experiences of four gay Black men with an undergraduate degree from a historically Black college or university (HBCU). The goal of the study was to learn about the individual experiences of these men through self-reflections. Data for the study was collected primarily through an autobiographical sketch that each participant completed and individual interviews that were conducted with each participant. The autobiographical sketches and interviews were transcribed and studied for emerging themes. Eight major themes emerged from this research, which included: deciding to attend an HBCU; coming out at an HBCU; witnessing harassment and homophobia during the college years; being a Black gay male in the Black community; being Black and gay in mainstream society; coping strategies; the significance of attending an HBCU; and summing up the HBCU experience. Each major theme had a series of sub-themes. Disclosing their sexual orientation subjected the research participants to witnessing harassment and homophobia during their college years. All of the participants either witnessed harassment of fraternity members, friends, college authorities, and family members. In the general Black community, the participants identified a number of issues they faced as Black gay men. “Black masculinity” was a phrase that most of the participants used when describing the expectation of Black men in the general Black community. The participants felt that mainstream White society was generally more accepting of homosexuality than the Black community. However, the participants also felt that they were victims of racism in mainstream White communities, both heterosexual and homosexual. The significance of attending an HBCU centered around finding support. All of the research participants identified their friendship circles as their main support system. Each participant also identified his religious and/or spiritual connection as being a support system. Life after an HBCU included each participant feeling that his HBCU indoctrinated him with: desire to give back to the community, passion to seek further education and gainful employment, and pride in being part of the HBCU tradition. Advisors/Committee Members: Robert, Young (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Colleges and Universities; Historically Black Colleges and Universities; College Students; Identity, Development; Racism; Homophobia; Heterosexism; African American; Black; Men; Males; Homosexuality; Gay; Undergraduate; Experiences

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ford, Obie, I. (2007). “This Is Who I Am:” The Lived Experiences of Black Gay Men With an Undergraduate Degree From a Historically Black College or University. (Doctoral Dissertation). Ohio University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1195566951

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ford, Obie, III. ““This Is Who I Am:” The Lived Experiences of Black Gay Men With an Undergraduate Degree From a Historically Black College or University.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Ohio University. Accessed January 18, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1195566951.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ford, Obie, III. ““This Is Who I Am:” The Lived Experiences of Black Gay Men With an Undergraduate Degree From a Historically Black College or University.” 2007. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Ford, Obie I. “This Is Who I Am:” The Lived Experiences of Black Gay Men With an Undergraduate Degree From a Historically Black College or University. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Ohio University; 2007. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1195566951.

Council of Science Editors:

Ford, Obie I. “This Is Who I Am:” The Lived Experiences of Black Gay Men With an Undergraduate Degree From a Historically Black College or University. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Ohio University; 2007. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1195566951


Texas State University – San Marcos

2. White, Anthony L. Mentoring Experiences of Undergraduate Black Males: A Case Study of Their Journeys, Access, and Participation.

Degree: PhD, Adult, Professional, and Community Education, 2013, Texas State University – San Marcos

The present qualitative case study documents the mentoring relationships and collegiate experiences of eight undergraduate Black males as well as their self-reported participation and access to mentoring. The main research question guiding the study was: What are the mentoring relationships and collegiate experiences of eight undergraduate Black males as well as their self-reported participation and access to mentoring? The supporting questions included: (1) What does mentoring look like for undergraduate Black males? (2) What are their perceptions of mentoring relationships? (3) How do these mentoring relationships impact their collegiate experience? Data collection sources for this study were: individual interviews, artifacts identified by the participants, a focus group session, and field notes. Narrative analysis served as the method for data analysis as data were collected through stories and accounts of the individual and collective experiences of the study participants. To this end, this dissertation provides two chapters for study findings, chapter four and chapter five. Chapter four provides detailed insight into the personal background of the eight Black male undergraduate participants, what mentoring looks like for them, and their perceptions of mentoring relationships. Chapter five documents the participant’s access to various forms of capital and the experiential learning product of their participation in mentoring programs offered by the university. Study findings are presented in light of Kolb’s (1984) experiential learning theory and forms of capital as described in the work of Bourdieu (1986) and Yosso (2005) and consist of cultural capital, social capital, and navigational capital. Finally, the last chapter presents highlights of participants’ perceptions about mentoring, a suggested best practices model, tensions and challenges related to the study, implications for practice, and ideas future research. Advisors/Committee Members: Larrotta, Clarena (advisor), Oliver, John A. (committee member), Ross-Gordon, Jovita M. (committee member), Stewart, Paul B. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Mentoring; Undergraduate Black Males; Experiential learning; Forms of capital; African American male college students; African American men – Education (Higher); African American college students – Social conditions; Mentoring in education – United States

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

White, A. L. (2013). Mentoring Experiences of Undergraduate Black Males: A Case Study of Their Journeys, Access, and Participation. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas State University – San Marcos. Retrieved from https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/4701

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

White, Anthony L. “Mentoring Experiences of Undergraduate Black Males: A Case Study of Their Journeys, Access, and Participation.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas State University – San Marcos. Accessed January 18, 2020. https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/4701.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

White, Anthony L. “Mentoring Experiences of Undergraduate Black Males: A Case Study of Their Journeys, Access, and Participation.” 2013. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

White AL. Mentoring Experiences of Undergraduate Black Males: A Case Study of Their Journeys, Access, and Participation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2013. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/4701.

Council of Science Editors:

White AL. Mentoring Experiences of Undergraduate Black Males: A Case Study of Their Journeys, Access, and Participation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2013. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/4701


University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

3. Johnson, Jamil D. Models of success: African American males and their pathways toward enrollment in doctoral programs at a predominantly white institution.

Degree: PhD, Educational Policy Studies, 2015, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

African American males are often characterized by disparaging terms, such as: endangered, uneducable, dysfunctional, incorrigible, and dangerous (Strayhorn, 2013, Ferguson, 2000, Gibbs, 1988; Majors & Billson, 1992; Parham & McDavis, 1987). These characterizations have a negative impact on African American male academic achievement and inclusion in society (Strayhorn, 2013). Case in point, African American males during their K-12 schooling elicit national attention about their dismal academic performance in relation to their majority counterparts. For example, only 12 percent of black fourth-grade boys are proficient in reading, compared with 38 percent of white boys, and only 12 percent of black eighth-grade boys are proficient in math, compared with 44 percent of white boys (Gabriel, 2010). For African American males who do gain entrée into four-year institutions of higher learning – the results are discouraging: literature indicates high dropout rates (Tinto, 1993) and many report a lack of socialization into the campus community. At the post-baccalaureate stage - the enrollment of African American males in doctoral programs has provoked serious debates within the academy. These discussions typically conclude with a unified goal to increase the participation of African American males in doctoral programs and encourage them to pursue tenured track positions. The study examines the enrollment trends of African American males at a Midwest Predominantly White Research Extensive Institution. The study demonstrates profiles of successful African American males thematically discussing the factors that resulted in their pathways toward enrolling in doctoral programs. The findings are important as they provide an additional layer of information graduate programs can use to increase enrollment of African American males. Advisors/Committee Members: Trent, William T. (advisor), Trent, William T. (Committee Chair), Anderson, James D. (committee member), Span, Christopher M. (committee member), Baber, Lorenzo (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: African American; African American Males; Underrepresented Students; Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM); Enrollment of African American Males in Doctoral Study; Graduate Study; Social Barriers; Urban Neighborhoods; Summer Research Opportunities Program (SROP); Ronald E. McNair Scholars Program; Predominately White Institutions (PWI); Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs); Access and Participation of African American Males in Higher Education; Educational Pipeline; Gateway Courses; High School; Secondary Education; Qualitative Methods; Racism; Student Integration Theory; Engagement Model; First-Generation; Black Greek Organizations; First Year Experience (FYE); Stereotypes; Cultural Capital; Social Capital; Humanities; Mentoring; Undergraduate Research Programs; Professoriate; Professor; Parental Involvement; Outreach; Recruitment; Recruitment of Underrepresented groups for Higher Education; Minority Studies; Sociology of Education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Johnson, J. D. (2015). Models of success: African American males and their pathways toward enrollment in doctoral programs at a predominantly white institution. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/78402

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Johnson, Jamil D. “Models of success: African American males and their pathways toward enrollment in doctoral programs at a predominantly white institution.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed January 18, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/78402.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Johnson, Jamil D. “Models of success: African American males and their pathways toward enrollment in doctoral programs at a predominantly white institution.” 2015. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Johnson JD. Models of success: African American males and their pathways toward enrollment in doctoral programs at a predominantly white institution. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2015. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/78402.

Council of Science Editors:

Johnson JD. Models of success: African American males and their pathways toward enrollment in doctoral programs at a predominantly white institution. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/78402

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