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Stellenbosch University

1. Heynes, Andre. The vulnerability of adolescents participating in rugby and football in Dubai, UAE, to exertional heat illness.

Degree: MScPhysio, Health, 2018, Stellenbosch University

ENGLISH SUMMARY : Background: Regular appropriate physical activity for children and adolescents are needed to improve and maintain health. There are several risk factors for developing exertional heat illness (EHI), which negatively affect the thermoregulatory ability of the body, resulting in increased core body temperature. Exercising in high environmental temperatures and humidity increase the risk for EHI. Dubai, UAE, experience these environmental conditions. EHI presents as symptoms ranging from exercise associated muscle cramps, heat syncope and exercise related collapse, heat exhaustion, and exertional heat stroke. In the USA, exertional heat stroke is the leading cause of death in young athletes. Objective: To determine the vulnerability of adolescent union rugby and football participants in terms of risk factors present for EHI, self-reported EHI symptoms and the hydration practices of the participants for the duration of the study. Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive design was used to address the research questions. The study was conducted at clubs offering union rugby or football in the Middle Eastern city of Dubai, UAE. Population sampling was applied, which included adolescents, aged between 10 -19 years old. The study occurred during a single training session at the start of the 2015/2016 season, during the month of October 2015. A questionnaire was used to elicit responses from the participants to measure self-reported risk factors, symptoms of EHI and hydration practices. Results: A response rate of 22.4% (n= 111) was obtained, 49 union rugby and 62 football participants were recruited from a total of 500 players that initially attended the information session. The main findings of the study include: 19 % (n=21) of participants self-reported EHI risk factors; 14.4% (n= 16) of participants’ self-reported exercises-associated muscles cramps, which was the only EHI symptom category, and 10.8% (n= 12) of participants did not report any EHI symptom. Fluid was consumed by 94.5% (n= 105) before training, 100% (n= 111) during training, and 100% after training. Water was the most abundant fluid consumed before (86%, n= 91), during (94.5%, n=105) or after (55%, n= 61) training. Many participants (77.5%, n= 86) indicated that they are knowledgeable if they consumed too much fluid. Beside fluid provided by the two football clubs, no other side-line support measures were noted. Poorer general physical fitness was associated with more EHI symptoms (rho = -0.211, p = .026). An additional significant association was found between the number of EHI risk factors and the fluid intake volume after practice, with higher intake being associated with more symptoms (rho = 0.197, p = .043). In those participants who reported generally better physical fitness (rho = -0.206, p = .030), significantly fewer EHI symptoms were noted. For those participants who reported consuming more fluids before practice (rho = 0.313, p = .001), and consuming fluids a longer time prior to practice (rho = 0.253, p = .009), the number of… Advisors/Committee Members: Louw, Quinette, Ernstzen, Dawn, Potgieter, Sunita, Stellenbosch University. Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Dept. of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences. Physiotherapy..

Subjects/Keywords: Exertional heat illness  – Environmental aspects; Themoregulatory ability; Heat  – Physiological effect; Heat stroke  – Environmental aspects; Rugby Union football players; Teenagers; UCTD

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APA (6th Edition):

Heynes, A. (2018). The vulnerability of adolescents participating in rugby and football in Dubai, UAE, to exertional heat illness. (Masters Thesis). Stellenbosch University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/103415

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Heynes, Andre. “The vulnerability of adolescents participating in rugby and football in Dubai, UAE, to exertional heat illness.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Stellenbosch University. Accessed May 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/103415.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Heynes, Andre. “The vulnerability of adolescents participating in rugby and football in Dubai, UAE, to exertional heat illness.” 2018. Web. 08 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Heynes A. The vulnerability of adolescents participating in rugby and football in Dubai, UAE, to exertional heat illness. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Stellenbosch University; 2018. [cited 2021 May 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/103415.

Council of Science Editors:

Heynes A. The vulnerability of adolescents participating in rugby and football in Dubai, UAE, to exertional heat illness. [Masters Thesis]. Stellenbosch University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/103415

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