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You searched for subject:(The English Schism). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Combs, Rachel Lea. Breaking Expectations: Deviations from Genre, Gender, and Social Order in the Clerk's and the Merchant's Tales.

Degree: MAin English, English, 2017, Missouri State University

Breaking Expectations: Deviations from Genre, Gender, and Social Order in the Clerk's and Merchant's Tales seeks to reconcile deviations in traditional form and representations of marital authority in both tales by understanding Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales as existing in and responding to a shifting social hierarchy. After establishing that the Peasants' Revolt of 1381 and John Wyclif's heretical tracts signified drastic challenges to received systems of social, political, and religious authority, I assert that the disruption of genre and medieval models of wifehood in the Clerk's Tale and the Merchant's Tale is a recognition-celebratory for the Clerk and bitter for the Merchant-that the social hierarchy and the medieval marriage are transforming. Both pilgrims choose a typical medieval genre-the exemplum in the Clerk's Tale and the fabliau in the Merchant's-yet both narrators manipulate the traditional conventions of the form. Like the drastic and ongoing fourteenth-century challenges to traditional power structures, both Tales overturn traditional conventions in form, therefore revealing their dramatic authors' expectations for household authority. Advisors/Committee Members: Jonathan Newman.

Subjects/Keywords: Peasants' Revolt of 1381; Great Schism; John Wyclif; form; medieval wifehood; social commentary; livelihood; Geoffrey Chaucer; The Canterbury Tales; English Language and Literature

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Combs, R. L. (2017). Breaking Expectations: Deviations from Genre, Gender, and Social Order in the Clerk's and the Merchant's Tales. (Masters Thesis). Missouri State University. Retrieved from https://bearworks.missouristate.edu/theses/3153

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Combs, Rachel Lea. “Breaking Expectations: Deviations from Genre, Gender, and Social Order in the Clerk's and the Merchant's Tales.” 2017. Masters Thesis, Missouri State University. Accessed January 24, 2020. https://bearworks.missouristate.edu/theses/3153.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Combs, Rachel Lea. “Breaking Expectations: Deviations from Genre, Gender, and Social Order in the Clerk's and the Merchant's Tales.” 2017. Web. 24 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Combs RL. Breaking Expectations: Deviations from Genre, Gender, and Social Order in the Clerk's and the Merchant's Tales. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Missouri State University; 2017. [cited 2020 Jan 24]. Available from: https://bearworks.missouristate.edu/theses/3153.

Council of Science Editors:

Combs RL. Breaking Expectations: Deviations from Genre, Gender, and Social Order in the Clerk's and the Merchant's Tales. [Masters Thesis]. Missouri State University; 2017. Available from: https://bearworks.missouristate.edu/theses/3153

2. Hernandez Grande, Alicia. “A SPANIARD IS NO ENLISHMAN THAT I KNOWE” ANGLO-SPANIARD POLITICS IN EARLY MODERN THEATRE.

Degree: Theatre Program, 2014, University of Houston

Postcolonial studies of Early Modern English drama’s Moorish and Jewish characters, as elaborated by scholars such as Edward Said and Daniel Vitkus, have framed the discussion as a black (Moor/Jew) versus white (Protestant English) dichotomy. This Master’s thesis revises this binary to address certain “grey” characters which do not comfortably fit in either white or black camps yet occupy intriguing positions in Early Modern works. While much scholarly attention has been devoted to the cultural and racial backgrounds of Othello, Shylock, Jessica, and the Prince of Morocco, the focus on Moors and Jews in Othello and The Merchant of Venice has edged out another identity present in those and others of Shakespeare’s works: the Spaniard. Shakespeare’s Spanish characters are portrayed as debased outsiders (Iago, Roderigo) or as representatives of a threatening rival colonial power (Iago, the Prince of Aragorn). All of these characters are vilified through their iconoclastic Catholic faith, as well as their mixed race heritage due to the Moorish occupation of Spain. Meanwhile, Thomas Kyd further demonizes his Spanish characters in The Spanish Tragedy, making a historical argument which reflects onto the entire country. From the Spanish perspective, Pedro Calderón de la Barca’s El cisma de Inglaterra exemplifies how the Spanish perceived their English enemies. I survey how the development of Anglo-Spaniard politics in the Early Modern Period developed ideas concerning Spanish and English nationality. Advisors/Committee Members: Kirk, Keith B. (advisor), Shimko, Robert B. (committee member), Christensen, Ann (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Spain; England; Shakespeare; Thomas Kyd; Calderon de la Barca; The Spanish Tragedy; Othello; The English Schism; Theatre

…Tragedy is one of the few English plays of this era that deals with an all Iberian cast in Spain… …of the Spanish on the English stage is not too difficult to find, any discussion of the… …English on the Spanish stage is rare. Recognizing that the Spanish too had an opinion and a part… …to play in all this history, I discuss El cisma de Inglaterra9 (The Schism of… …on English theatre, but English theatre was still influenced by the larger Renaissance era… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hernandez Grande, A. (2014). “A SPANIARD IS NO ENLISHMAN THAT I KNOWE” ANGLO-SPANIARD POLITICS IN EARLY MODERN THEATRE. (Thesis). University of Houston. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10657/730

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hernandez Grande, Alicia. ““A SPANIARD IS NO ENLISHMAN THAT I KNOWE” ANGLO-SPANIARD POLITICS IN EARLY MODERN THEATRE.” 2014. Thesis, University of Houston. Accessed January 24, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10657/730.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hernandez Grande, Alicia. ““A SPANIARD IS NO ENLISHMAN THAT I KNOWE” ANGLO-SPANIARD POLITICS IN EARLY MODERN THEATRE.” 2014. Web. 24 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Hernandez Grande A. “A SPANIARD IS NO ENLISHMAN THAT I KNOWE” ANGLO-SPANIARD POLITICS IN EARLY MODERN THEATRE. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Houston; 2014. [cited 2020 Jan 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/730.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hernandez Grande A. “A SPANIARD IS NO ENLISHMAN THAT I KNOWE” ANGLO-SPANIARD POLITICS IN EARLY MODERN THEATRE. [Thesis]. University of Houston; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/730

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.