Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(The Day After). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Georgia State University

1. Underwood, Aubrey. The Apocalypse will be Televised: Representations of the Cold War on Network Television, 1976-1987.

Degree: History, 2011, Georgia State University

This dissertation examines how the major television networks, in conjunction with the Reagan administration, launched a lingering cloud of nuclear anxiety that helped to revive the Cold War during the 1980s. Placed within a larger political and cultural post-war context, this national preoccupation with a global show-down with the Soviet Union at times both hindered and bolstered Reagan’s image as the archetypal conservative, cowboy President that could free America from its liberal adolescent past now caustically referred to as “the sixties.” This stalwart image of Reagan, created and carefully managed by a number of highly-paid marketing executives, as one of the embodiment of peaceful deterrence, came under attack in the early 1980s when the “liberal” Nuclear Freeze movement showed signs of becoming politically threatening to the staunch conservative pledging to win the Cold War at any cost. And even if the nuclear freeze movement itself was not powerful enough to undergo the Herculean task of removing the President in 1984, the movement was compassionate enough to appeal to a mass audience, especially when framed in narrative form on network television. In the early 1980s, debates over the possibility of nuclear war and other pertinent Cold War related issues became much more democratized in their visibility on the network airwaves. However, the message disseminated from the networks was not placed in an educational framework, nor did these television productions clarify complicated nuclear issues such as nuclear winter theory and proliferation. I argue this renewed network attention on nuclear issues was not placed in an historical framework and likely confused American viewers because it routinely exposed audiences to both fact and fiction, undifferentiated at the level of the mass media. Advisors/Committee Members: Michelle Brattain, Joe Perry, Kathy Fuller-Seeley.

Subjects/Keywords: Ronald Reagan; Cold War; Network television; Made-for-television movies; World War III; Special Bulletin; The Day After; Threads; Amerika; Nuclear freeze movement; Nuclear winter theory; Nuclear weapons; Strategic Defensive Initiative; “Star Wars; ; Great Nuclear Arms Debate; Infotainment; “Morning in America campaign” 1984 US Presidential Campaign; Walter Mondale; History

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Underwood, A. (2011). The Apocalypse will be Televised: Representations of the Cold War on Network Television, 1976-1987. (Thesis). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/history_diss/27

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Underwood, Aubrey. “The Apocalypse will be Televised: Representations of the Cold War on Network Television, 1976-1987.” 2011. Thesis, Georgia State University. Accessed December 15, 2019. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/history_diss/27.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Underwood, Aubrey. “The Apocalypse will be Televised: Representations of the Cold War on Network Television, 1976-1987.” 2011. Web. 15 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Underwood A. The Apocalypse will be Televised: Representations of the Cold War on Network Television, 1976-1987. [Internet] [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2011. [cited 2019 Dec 15]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/history_diss/27.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Underwood A. The Apocalypse will be Televised: Representations of the Cold War on Network Television, 1976-1987. [Thesis]. Georgia State University; 2011. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/history_diss/27

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Knoblauch, William M. Selling the Second Cold War: Antinuclear Cultural Activism and Reagan Era Foreign Policy.

Degree: PhD, History (Arts and Sciences), 2012, Ohio University

This dissertation examines how 1980s antinuclear activists utilized popular culture to criticize the Reagan administration's arms buildup. The 1970s and the era of détente marked a decade-long nadir for American antinuclear activism. Ronald Reagan's rise to the presidency in 1981 helped to usher in the "Second Cold War," a period of reignited Cold War animosities that rekindled atomic anxiety. As the arms race escalated, antinuclear activism surged. Alongside grassroots movements, such as the nuclear freeze campaign, a unique group of antinuclear activists – including publishers, authors, directors, musicians, scientists, and celebrities – challenged Reagan's military buildup in American mass media and popular culture. These activists included Fate of the Earth author Jonathan Schell, Day After director Nicholas Meyer, and "nuclear winter" scientific-spokesperson Carl Sagan. Through popular media, these figures spread criticisms of Reagan's Cold War initiatives, such as the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI, or "Star Wars") and the American nuclear missile deployment in Europe, to millions of Americans. Their efforts not only popularized the nuclear freeze campaign, but also influenced leaders in Australia, New Zealand, and in the Vatican, to question and even reject U.S. policies. In short, antinuclear cultural activism posed a serious threat to Reagan's Cold War initiatives. This dissertation utilizes research from presidential libraries, television news archives, and special collections, as well as cultural analysis and contemporary interviews, to reassert cultural activism's importance in Cold War history. In the 1980s, American mass media became a contested space in which the Reagan administration battled antinuclear cultural activists for American hearts and minds. Archival research reveals that this cultural activism alarmed the White House. Angered at antinuclear activists ability to permeate popular culture, the White House developed public affairs strategies to repackage its foreign policy and rebrand Reagan as a peacekeeper. Still, the Reagan administration's refusal to side publicly with pro-arms buildup groups – such as Daniel Graham's pro-SDI group "High Frontier" – shows that the White House took these antinuclear warnings seriously. If activists' efforts ultimately failed to sway a majority of Americans' views on Reagan, they only failed in the face of a considerable and coordinated White House response. By 1985, the White House had won the media battle, but not before shifting its rhetoric and reconsidering its policies. In 1981, the Reagan administration boasted about prevailing in a nuclear war. In the wake of antinuclear cultural activism, they expressed activists' belief that a nuclear war can never be won and must never be fought. Advisors/Committee Members: Pach, Chester (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: History; Ronald Reagan; Arms Race; Nuclear Freeze; 1980s; Strategic Defense Initiative; Star Wars; SDI; Nuclear Winter; Carl Sagan; The Day After; Fate of the Earth; Second Cold War; Nuclear Weapons

…example, although the film The Day After was one of the most widely watched events in television… …cases, the media frenzy over antinuclear films, such as The Day After, or books, such as Fate… …propaganda campaign. Chapter 6 examines The Day After, an antinuclear film promoted as a two-hour… …public service announcement” about the dangers of the arms race. The story of The Day After and… …after” nuclear winter, from The Cold and the Dark ..249 Image 17: NASA stock footage of… 

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Knoblauch, W. M. (2012). Selling the Second Cold War: Antinuclear Cultural Activism and Reagan Era Foreign Policy. (Doctoral Dissertation). Ohio University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1330967967

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Knoblauch, William M. “Selling the Second Cold War: Antinuclear Cultural Activism and Reagan Era Foreign Policy.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Ohio University. Accessed December 15, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1330967967.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Knoblauch, William M. “Selling the Second Cold War: Antinuclear Cultural Activism and Reagan Era Foreign Policy.” 2012. Web. 15 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Knoblauch WM. Selling the Second Cold War: Antinuclear Cultural Activism and Reagan Era Foreign Policy. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Ohio University; 2012. [cited 2019 Dec 15]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1330967967.

Council of Science Editors:

Knoblauch WM. Selling the Second Cold War: Antinuclear Cultural Activism and Reagan Era Foreign Policy. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Ohio University; 2012. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1330967967


Rhode Island College

3. Fernandes, Adam T. Hiding Hiroshima.

Degree: MA, 2009, Rhode Island College

Explores the representation of nuclear weapons in Japanese anime and US live action cinema in the 1980's, using methods from cultural studies. Examines, specifically, the silences and contradictions of the selected films to reveal the cultural ideologies of Japan and the United States during the time in which the films were produced. Analyzes the Japanese animated films, Barefoot Gen, Barefoot Gen 2, and Grave of the Fireflies, and the American live action films, The Day After, Testament, and Miracle Mile. Advisors/Committee Members: Kalinak, Kathryn.

Subjects/Keywords: Entertainment industry, History, Motion pictures, Performing arts, Society; American Film Studies; Cultural History; East Asian Languages and Societies; Film and Media Studies; Politics and Social Change; Social and Cultural Anthropology; Social History; United States History; film analysis; motion pictures; Japanese anime; US live action cinema; 1980's American culture; 1980's Japanese culture; nuclear weapons; atomic bomb; nuclear holocaust; World War II; Barefoot Gen (Motion picture); Barefoot Gen 2 (Motion picture); Grave of the Fireflies (Motion picture); The Day After (Motion picture); Testament (Motion picture); Miracle Mile (Motion picture); Hiroshima in motion pictures; nuclear warfare in motion pictures; animated films; action and adventure films

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Fernandes, A. T. (2009). Hiding Hiroshima. (Masters Thesis). Rhode Island College. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.ric.edu/etd/28

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fernandes, Adam T. “Hiding Hiroshima.” 2009. Masters Thesis, Rhode Island College. Accessed December 15, 2019. https://digitalcommons.ric.edu/etd/28.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fernandes, Adam T. “Hiding Hiroshima.” 2009. Web. 15 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Fernandes AT. Hiding Hiroshima. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Rhode Island College; 2009. [cited 2019 Dec 15]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.ric.edu/etd/28.

Council of Science Editors:

Fernandes AT. Hiding Hiroshima. [Masters Thesis]. Rhode Island College; 2009. Available from: https://digitalcommons.ric.edu/etd/28

.