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You searched for subject:(The Anathemata). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Cambridge

1. Assaly, Alex Michael. Play Among the Ruins: David Jones, Meaning, and Play.

Degree: PhD, 2019, University of Cambridge

In “Art in Relation to War,” David Jones makes a terse, but stimulating comment on art and the creative process: “An act of art is essentially a gratuitous act. [...] It is essentially ‘play.’” The aim of this dissertation is to examine Jones’s work in relation to the concept of playfulness. Although it makes the most of play’s various associations (pleasure, joyousness, games, children’s play), this dissertation uses the word to describe an activity that is gratuitous (that serves no end other than itself) and, moreover, that is paradoxically material and immaterial, rule-bound (containing aesthetic, intellectual, and theoretical constraints) and free, at once. By approaching Jones’s poetic and visual work by way of the word play, this dissertation provides a model of interpretation that is new to Jones studies and puts pressure on the serious and statement-driven modes of interpretation often used by his readers. “Play Among the Ruins: David Jones, Meaning, and Play” begins with an Introduction that examines the working sense of play that emerges in Jones’s essays and letters. After defining play as a gratuitous act, this introductory chapter positions Jones’s sense of the word in relation to his Catholic beliefs and, later, to the playful aspects of his subjective life, particularly his child-like behaviour and what Donald Winnicott would describe as his issues around personal attachment and development. Additionally, this chapter provides the reader with a definition and history of play, touching upon various theoretical uses of the word by thinkers like Plato, Aristotle, Kant, and Schiller. Chapter 1 then considers play in the context of aesthetic interpretation. The chapter examines the ways that Jones’s reviewers have applied constricting models of interpretation to his poetic and visual work and culminates in analyses of Paul Fussell and Elizabeth Ward’s unsympathetic studies of Jones. The chapter then ends by defining a mode of interpretation that is essentially playful and creative and, in turn, better suited to Jones’s own sense of his ideal readership. Building off of Chapter 1, Chapter 2 examines the “sacramental scholarship” that has developed around Jones. The chapter puts pressure on theologically strict applications of the words “sacrament” and “signum efficax” to Jones’s art and suggests that there is a crucial fissure between his beliefs and his artistic pursuits. Chapter 3 then turns to his art. The chapter draws attention to his early visual art, finding a connection between theories of children’s art and the styles he developed in the 1920s and 30s. Chapter 4 considers the stylistic play of In Parenthesis, using the amateurish behaviour of the book’s protagonist as a model by which to approach the book’s verbivocovisual experimentations in form. Chapter 5 looks at The Anathemata and, in particular, Jones’s understanding of the playfulness of the creative process. After considering the relationship between the trope of the game and mythopoetic conceptions of time, it turns to Jones’s…

Subjects/Keywords: David Jones; Play; Playfulness; Caritas; Meaning; In Parenthesis; The Anathemata; Dying Gaul; Children's Art; Kettle's Yard

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Assaly, A. M. (2019). Play Among the Ruins: David Jones, Meaning, and Play. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Cambridge. Retrieved from https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/296188

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Assaly, Alex Michael. “Play Among the Ruins: David Jones, Meaning, and Play.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Cambridge. Accessed September 24, 2020. https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/296188.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Assaly, Alex Michael. “Play Among the Ruins: David Jones, Meaning, and Play.” 2019. Web. 24 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Assaly AM. Play Among the Ruins: David Jones, Meaning, and Play. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Cambridge; 2019. [cited 2020 Sep 24]. Available from: https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/296188.

Council of Science Editors:

Assaly AM. Play Among the Ruins: David Jones, Meaning, and Play. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Cambridge; 2019. Available from: https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/296188


University of Oxford

2. Soud, William David. Toward a divinised poetics : God, self, and poeisis in W.B. Yeats, David Jones, and T.S. Eliot.

Degree: PhD, 2013, University of Oxford

This thesis examines the traces of theological and broader religious discourses in selected works of three major twentieth-century poets. Each of the texts examined in this thesis encodes within its poetics a distinct, theologically derived conception of the ontological status of the self in relation to the Absolute. Yeats primarily envisions the relation as one of essential identity, Jones regards it as defined by alterity, and Eliot depicts it as dialectical and paradoxical. Critics have underestimated the impact on Yeats’s late work of his final and most sustained engagement with Indic traditions, which issued from his friendship and collaboration with Shri Purohit Swami. Though Yeats projected Theosophical notions on the Indic texts and traditions he studied with Purohit, he successfully incorporated principles of Classical Yoga and Tantra into his later poetry. Much of Yeats’s late poetics reflects his struggle to situate the individuated self ontologically in light of traditions that devalue that self in favor of an impersonal, cosmic subjectivity. David Jones’s The Anathemata encodes a religious position opposed to that of Yeats. For Jones, a devout Roman Catholic committed to the bodily, God is Wholly Other. The self is fallen and circumscribed, and must connect with the divine chiefly through the mediation of the sacraments. In The Anathemata, the poet functions as a kind of lay priest attempting sacramentally to recuperate sacred signs. Because, according to Jones’s exoteric theology, the self must love God through fellow creatures, The Anathemata is not only circular, forming a verbal templum around the Cross; it is also built of massive, rich elaborations of creaturely detail, including highly embroidered and historicized voices and discourses. Critics have long noted the influence of Christian mystical texts on Eliot’s Four Quartets, but some have also detected a countercurrent within the later three Quartets, one that resists the timeless even as the poem valorizes transcending time. This tension, central to Four Quartets, reflects Eliot’s engagement with the dialectical theology of Karl Barth. Eliot’s deployment of paradox and negation does not merely echo the apophatic theology of the mystical texts that figure in the poem; it also reflects the discursive strategies of Barth’s theology. The self in Four Quartets is dialectical and paradoxical: suspended between time and eternity, it can transcend its own finitude only by embracing it.

Subjects/Keywords: 808.819382; English Language and Literature; American literature in English; English and Old English literature; Intellectual History; Oriental philosophy; Chemical kinetics; Theology and Religion; Christianity and Christian spirituality; Islamic art; Religions of the Indian subcontinent.; Dramatic arts; Modern spiritual movements; Modern theology; yeats; eliot; jones; religion; poetics; modernism; poetry; theology; tantra; yoga; barth; theosophy; quartets; anathemata

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Soud, W. D. (2013). Toward a divinised poetics : God, self, and poeisis in W.B. Yeats, David Jones, and T.S. Eliot. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Oxford. Retrieved from http://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:331a692d-a40c-4d30-a05b-f0d224eb0055 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.595933

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Soud, William David. “Toward a divinised poetics : God, self, and poeisis in W.B. Yeats, David Jones, and T.S. Eliot.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Oxford. Accessed September 24, 2020. http://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:331a692d-a40c-4d30-a05b-f0d224eb0055 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.595933.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Soud, William David. “Toward a divinised poetics : God, self, and poeisis in W.B. Yeats, David Jones, and T.S. Eliot.” 2013. Web. 24 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Soud WD. Toward a divinised poetics : God, self, and poeisis in W.B. Yeats, David Jones, and T.S. Eliot. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Oxford; 2013. [cited 2020 Sep 24]. Available from: http://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:331a692d-a40c-4d30-a05b-f0d224eb0055 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.595933.

Council of Science Editors:

Soud WD. Toward a divinised poetics : God, self, and poeisis in W.B. Yeats, David Jones, and T.S. Eliot. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Oxford; 2013. Available from: http://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:331a692d-a40c-4d30-a05b-f0d224eb0055 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.595933

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