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You searched for subject:(T Cell Receptor ). Showing records 1 – 30 of 45254 total matches.

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University of Minnesota

1. Kotov, Dmitri. The role of T cell receptor affinity in CD4+ T cell differentiation.

Degree: PhD, Microbiology, Immunology and Cancer Biology, 2019, University of Minnesota

 Naïve helper T cells become activated when their T cell receptor (TCR) recognizes a microbial peptide presented on MHCII (p:MHCII) by dendritic cells (DCs). During… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: CD4+ T cell; Dendritic Cell; Helper T cell; T cell receptor

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APA (6th Edition):

Kotov, D. (2019). The role of T cell receptor affinity in CD4+ T cell differentiation. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Minnesota. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11299/202415

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kotov, Dmitri. “The role of T cell receptor affinity in CD4+ T cell differentiation.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Minnesota. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11299/202415.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kotov, Dmitri. “The role of T cell receptor affinity in CD4+ T cell differentiation.” 2019. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Kotov D. The role of T cell receptor affinity in CD4+ T cell differentiation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Minnesota; 2019. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11299/202415.

Council of Science Editors:

Kotov D. The role of T cell receptor affinity in CD4+ T cell differentiation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Minnesota; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11299/202415

2. Helou, Ynes. Dissection of T cell receptor-mediated signaling pathways using quantitative phosphoproteomics.

Degree: PhD, Molecular Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biotechnology, 2015, Brown University

 Activation of T cells via the T cell receptor (TCR) is a crucial event in the adaptive immune response, and is mediated by a delicate… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: T cell receptor signaling

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APA (6th Edition):

Helou, Y. (2015). Dissection of T cell receptor-mediated signaling pathways using quantitative phosphoproteomics. (Doctoral Dissertation). Brown University. Retrieved from https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:419500/

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Helou, Ynes. “Dissection of T cell receptor-mediated signaling pathways using quantitative phosphoproteomics.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Brown University. Accessed March 03, 2021. https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:419500/.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Helou, Ynes. “Dissection of T cell receptor-mediated signaling pathways using quantitative phosphoproteomics.” 2015. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Helou Y. Dissection of T cell receptor-mediated signaling pathways using quantitative phosphoproteomics. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Brown University; 2015. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:419500/.

Council of Science Editors:

Helou Y. Dissection of T cell receptor-mediated signaling pathways using quantitative phosphoproteomics. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Brown University; 2015. Available from: https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:419500/


University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

3. Harris, Daniel Thomas. Engineering and characterizing human T cell receptors for cancer immunotherapies.

Degree: PhD, Biochemistry, 2016, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

 The T cell receptor (TCR) is an heterodimer that binds to a short peptide bound to a product of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Immunotherapy; T Cell Receptor

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APA (6th Edition):

Harris, D. T. (2016). Engineering and characterizing human T cell receptors for cancer immunotherapies. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/95531

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Harris, Daniel Thomas. “Engineering and characterizing human T cell receptors for cancer immunotherapies.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/95531.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Harris, Daniel Thomas. “Engineering and characterizing human T cell receptors for cancer immunotherapies.” 2016. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Harris DT. Engineering and characterizing human T cell receptors for cancer immunotherapies. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2016. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/95531.

Council of Science Editors:

Harris DT. Engineering and characterizing human T cell receptors for cancer immunotherapies. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/95531

4. Fairbairn, Camilla Jayne. Searching for the missing T Cell Receptor (TCR) in Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL): Surplus to requirements or a protagonist in lymphomagenesis?.

Degree: PhD, 2018, University of Cambridge

 Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) is a peripheral T cell lymphoma divided into three distinct entities: ALCL, Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK)+, ALCL ALK- and cutaneous… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Analplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; T Cell; Lyphoma; T Cell Receptor; T Cell Signaling

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APA (6th Edition):

Fairbairn, C. J. (2018). Searching for the missing T Cell Receptor (TCR) in Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL): Surplus to requirements or a protagonist in lymphomagenesis?. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Cambridge. Retrieved from https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/273245

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fairbairn, Camilla Jayne. “Searching for the missing T Cell Receptor (TCR) in Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL): Surplus to requirements or a protagonist in lymphomagenesis?.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Cambridge. Accessed March 03, 2021. https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/273245.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fairbairn, Camilla Jayne. “Searching for the missing T Cell Receptor (TCR) in Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL): Surplus to requirements or a protagonist in lymphomagenesis?.” 2018. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Fairbairn CJ. Searching for the missing T Cell Receptor (TCR) in Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL): Surplus to requirements or a protagonist in lymphomagenesis?. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Cambridge; 2018. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/273245.

Council of Science Editors:

Fairbairn CJ. Searching for the missing T Cell Receptor (TCR) in Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL): Surplus to requirements or a protagonist in lymphomagenesis?. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Cambridge; 2018. Available from: https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/273245

5. Fairbairn, Camilla Jayne. Searching for the missing T Cell Receptor (TCR) in Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) : surplus to requirements or a protagonist in lymphomagenesis?.

Degree: PhD, 2018, University of Cambridge

 Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) is a peripheral T cell lymphoma divided into three distinct entities: ALCL, Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK)+, ALCL ALK- and cutaneous… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: 616.07; Analplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; T Cell; Lyphoma; T Cell Receptor; T Cell Signaling

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APA (6th Edition):

Fairbairn, C. J. (2018). Searching for the missing T Cell Receptor (TCR) in Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) : surplus to requirements or a protagonist in lymphomagenesis?. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Cambridge. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.17863/CAM.20257 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.744544

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fairbairn, Camilla Jayne. “Searching for the missing T Cell Receptor (TCR) in Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) : surplus to requirements or a protagonist in lymphomagenesis?.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Cambridge. Accessed March 03, 2021. https://doi.org/10.17863/CAM.20257 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.744544.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fairbairn, Camilla Jayne. “Searching for the missing T Cell Receptor (TCR) in Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) : surplus to requirements or a protagonist in lymphomagenesis?.” 2018. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Fairbairn CJ. Searching for the missing T Cell Receptor (TCR) in Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) : surplus to requirements or a protagonist in lymphomagenesis?. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Cambridge; 2018. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: https://doi.org/10.17863/CAM.20257 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.744544.

Council of Science Editors:

Fairbairn CJ. Searching for the missing T Cell Receptor (TCR) in Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) : surplus to requirements or a protagonist in lymphomagenesis?. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Cambridge; 2018. Available from: https://doi.org/10.17863/CAM.20257 ; https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.744544


University of Toronto

6. Zhou, Jun Yu. Characterization of NLRC3 and its Mechanism of Action in Regulating T cell Function and Activation.

Degree: 2014, University of Toronto

NLRC3 is a newly discovered Nod-like receptor with immune regulatory functions. Strikingly, NLRC3 is highly expressed in lymphocytes, with the highest expression in T cells.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: NLRC3; NOD-like receptor; T cell biology; T cell function; 0982

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APA (6th Edition):

Zhou, J. Y. (2014). Characterization of NLRC3 and its Mechanism of Action in Regulating T cell Function and Activation. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/68569

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zhou, Jun Yu. “Characterization of NLRC3 and its Mechanism of Action in Regulating T cell Function and Activation.” 2014. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/68569.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zhou, Jun Yu. “Characterization of NLRC3 and its Mechanism of Action in Regulating T cell Function and Activation.” 2014. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Zhou JY. Characterization of NLRC3 and its Mechanism of Action in Regulating T cell Function and Activation. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2014. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/68569.

Council of Science Editors:

Zhou JY. Characterization of NLRC3 and its Mechanism of Action in Regulating T cell Function and Activation. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/68569


Boston University

7. Gagne, Matthew James. Cellular mechanisms that establish HIV-1 latency in CD4+ T cells and the potential for their manipulation as a therapeutic strategy.

Degree: PhD, Microbiology, 2019, Boston University

 Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1) remains a significant public health concern due to the lack of a cure. In spite of anti-retroviral therapies, HIV-1 persists… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Microbiology; CRISPR; HIV; Latency; T Cell; T Cell receptor; Transcription

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APA (6th Edition):

Gagne, M. J. (2019). Cellular mechanisms that establish HIV-1 latency in CD4+ T cells and the potential for their manipulation as a therapeutic strategy. (Doctoral Dissertation). Boston University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2144/36677

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gagne, Matthew James. “Cellular mechanisms that establish HIV-1 latency in CD4+ T cells and the potential for their manipulation as a therapeutic strategy.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, Boston University. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2144/36677.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gagne, Matthew James. “Cellular mechanisms that establish HIV-1 latency in CD4+ T cells and the potential for their manipulation as a therapeutic strategy.” 2019. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Gagne MJ. Cellular mechanisms that establish HIV-1 latency in CD4+ T cells and the potential for their manipulation as a therapeutic strategy. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Boston University; 2019. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2144/36677.

Council of Science Editors:

Gagne MJ. Cellular mechanisms that establish HIV-1 latency in CD4+ T cells and the potential for their manipulation as a therapeutic strategy. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Boston University; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2144/36677


Australian National University

8. Singh, Mandeep. An investigation into autoimmune pathogenesis by tracking and profiling T cell clones .

Degree: 2017, Australian National University

 Multiple immune tolerance checkpoints ensure that T cells carrying self-reactive T cell receptors (TCRs) are either purged during development or inactivated in the periphery. How… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Autoimmunity; T cell tolerance; T cell receptor; TCR deep sequencing

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APA (6th Edition):

Singh, M. (2017). An investigation into autoimmune pathogenesis by tracking and profiling T cell clones . (Thesis). Australian National University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1885/132693

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Singh, Mandeep. “An investigation into autoimmune pathogenesis by tracking and profiling T cell clones .” 2017. Thesis, Australian National University. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1885/132693.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Singh, Mandeep. “An investigation into autoimmune pathogenesis by tracking and profiling T cell clones .” 2017. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Singh M. An investigation into autoimmune pathogenesis by tracking and profiling T cell clones . [Internet] [Thesis]. Australian National University; 2017. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1885/132693.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Singh M. An investigation into autoimmune pathogenesis by tracking and profiling T cell clones . [Thesis]. Australian National University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1885/132693

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of New South Wales

9. Greenaway, Hui Yee. A computational approach to understanding the factors that shape the T cell receptor repertoire.

Degree: Centre for Vascular Research, 2012, University of New South Wales

 The shapes of the naive and memory T cell receptor (TCR) repertoires are key determinants of whether an effective immune response will be mounted in… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: convergent recombination; T cell; T cell receptor; computational immunology

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APA (6th Edition):

Greenaway, H. Y. (2012). A computational approach to understanding the factors that shape the T cell receptor repertoire. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/52266 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:10938/SOURCE01?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Greenaway, Hui Yee. “A computational approach to understanding the factors that shape the T cell receptor repertoire.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of New South Wales. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/52266 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:10938/SOURCE01?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Greenaway, Hui Yee. “A computational approach to understanding the factors that shape the T cell receptor repertoire.” 2012. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Greenaway HY. A computational approach to understanding the factors that shape the T cell receptor repertoire. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2012. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/52266 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:10938/SOURCE01?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Greenaway HY. A computational approach to understanding the factors that shape the T cell receptor repertoire. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of New South Wales; 2012. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/52266 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:10938/SOURCE01?view=true


Arizona State University

10. Schoettle, Louis Noble. Bowties, Barcodes, and DNA Origami; A Novel Approach for Paired-Chain Immune Receptor Repertoire Analysis.

Degree: Microbiology, 2017, Arizona State University

 There are many biological questions that require single-cell analysis of gene sequences, including analysis of clonally distributed dimeric immunoreceptors on lymphocytes (T cells and B… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Immunology; DNA Origami; Nanostructures; T cell; T cell receptor

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APA (6th Edition):

Schoettle, L. N. (2017). Bowties, Barcodes, and DNA Origami; A Novel Approach for Paired-Chain Immune Receptor Repertoire Analysis. (Doctoral Dissertation). Arizona State University. Retrieved from http://repository.asu.edu/items/46219

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Schoettle, Louis Noble. “Bowties, Barcodes, and DNA Origami; A Novel Approach for Paired-Chain Immune Receptor Repertoire Analysis.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Arizona State University. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://repository.asu.edu/items/46219.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Schoettle, Louis Noble. “Bowties, Barcodes, and DNA Origami; A Novel Approach for Paired-Chain Immune Receptor Repertoire Analysis.” 2017. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Schoettle LN. Bowties, Barcodes, and DNA Origami; A Novel Approach for Paired-Chain Immune Receptor Repertoire Analysis. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Arizona State University; 2017. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://repository.asu.edu/items/46219.

Council of Science Editors:

Schoettle LN. Bowties, Barcodes, and DNA Origami; A Novel Approach for Paired-Chain Immune Receptor Repertoire Analysis. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Arizona State University; 2017. Available from: http://repository.asu.edu/items/46219


Texas A&M University

11. Seelye, Stacie Lynn. Genomic Organization of Zebrafish (Danio rerio) T Cell Receptor α/δ Locus and Analysis of Expressed Products.

Degree: MS, Biomedical Sciences, 2016, Texas A&M University

 In testing the hypothesis that all jawed vertebrate classes employ immunoglobulin heavy chain V (IgHV) gene segments in their T cell receptor (TCR)δ encoding loci,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: T Cell Receptor α/δ; Danio rerio

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APA (6th Edition):

Seelye, S. L. (2016). Genomic Organization of Zebrafish (Danio rerio) T Cell Receptor α/δ Locus and Analysis of Expressed Products. (Masters Thesis). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/156980

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Seelye, Stacie Lynn. “Genomic Organization of Zebrafish (Danio rerio) T Cell Receptor α/δ Locus and Analysis of Expressed Products.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Texas A&M University. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/156980.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Seelye, Stacie Lynn. “Genomic Organization of Zebrafish (Danio rerio) T Cell Receptor α/δ Locus and Analysis of Expressed Products.” 2016. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Seelye SL. Genomic Organization of Zebrafish (Danio rerio) T Cell Receptor α/δ Locus and Analysis of Expressed Products. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2016. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/156980.

Council of Science Editors:

Seelye SL. Genomic Organization of Zebrafish (Danio rerio) T Cell Receptor α/δ Locus and Analysis of Expressed Products. [Masters Thesis]. Texas A&M University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/156980


Texas A&M University

12. Breaux, Breanna Laine. The Florida Manatee Adaptive Immune Receptor Genes Reveal Novel Patterns in Mammalian Evolution.

Degree: PhD, Veterinary Pathobiology, 2018, Texas A&M University

 The adaptive immune system is responsible for an antigen-specific response that is stronger and faster with each subsequent infection. The hallmarks of this response are… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: immunoglobulin; t cell receptor; manatee; clan; synteny

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APA (6th Edition):

Breaux, B. L. (2018). The Florida Manatee Adaptive Immune Receptor Genes Reveal Novel Patterns in Mammalian Evolution. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173818

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Breaux, Breanna Laine. “The Florida Manatee Adaptive Immune Receptor Genes Reveal Novel Patterns in Mammalian Evolution.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173818.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Breaux, Breanna Laine. “The Florida Manatee Adaptive Immune Receptor Genes Reveal Novel Patterns in Mammalian Evolution.” 2018. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Breaux BL. The Florida Manatee Adaptive Immune Receptor Genes Reveal Novel Patterns in Mammalian Evolution. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2018. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173818.

Council of Science Editors:

Breaux BL. The Florida Manatee Adaptive Immune Receptor Genes Reveal Novel Patterns in Mammalian Evolution. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173818


Texas A&M University

13. Breaux, Breanna Laine. The Florida Manatee Adaptive Immune Receptor Genes Reveal Novel Patterns in Mammalian Evolution.

Degree: PhD, Veterinary Pathobiology, 2018, Texas A&M University

 The adaptive immune system is responsible for an antigen-specific response that is stronger and faster with each subsequent infection. The hallmarks of this response are… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: immunoglobulin; t cell receptor; manatee; clan; synteny

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APA (6th Edition):

Breaux, B. L. (2018). The Florida Manatee Adaptive Immune Receptor Genes Reveal Novel Patterns in Mammalian Evolution. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas A&M University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173723

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Breaux, Breanna Laine. “The Florida Manatee Adaptive Immune Receptor Genes Reveal Novel Patterns in Mammalian Evolution.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas A&M University. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173723.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Breaux, Breanna Laine. “The Florida Manatee Adaptive Immune Receptor Genes Reveal Novel Patterns in Mammalian Evolution.” 2018. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Breaux BL. The Florida Manatee Adaptive Immune Receptor Genes Reveal Novel Patterns in Mammalian Evolution. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2018. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173723.

Council of Science Editors:

Breaux BL. The Florida Manatee Adaptive Immune Receptor Genes Reveal Novel Patterns in Mammalian Evolution. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas A&M University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1969.1/173723


University of Toronto

14. Guo, Tingxi. Molecular Mechanisms of Self-Recognition by CD1d- and CD1c-Restricted Alpha/Beta T Cell Receptors.

Degree: PhD, 2018, University of Toronto

 Adoptive T cell immunotherapy has demonstrated clinically relevant efficacy in treating malignant and infectious diseases. However, most of these therapies have focused on enhancing, or… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: CD1; self-recognition; T cell receptor; 0982

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APA (6th Edition):

Guo, T. (2018). Molecular Mechanisms of Self-Recognition by CD1d- and CD1c-Restricted Alpha/Beta T Cell Receptors. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/91782

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Guo, Tingxi. “Molecular Mechanisms of Self-Recognition by CD1d- and CD1c-Restricted Alpha/Beta T Cell Receptors.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/91782.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Guo, Tingxi. “Molecular Mechanisms of Self-Recognition by CD1d- and CD1c-Restricted Alpha/Beta T Cell Receptors.” 2018. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Guo T. Molecular Mechanisms of Self-Recognition by CD1d- and CD1c-Restricted Alpha/Beta T Cell Receptors. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2018. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/91782.

Council of Science Editors:

Guo T. Molecular Mechanisms of Self-Recognition by CD1d- and CD1c-Restricted Alpha/Beta T Cell Receptors. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/91782


University of Melbourne

15. PELLICCI, DANIEL GRANT. The molecular and structural basis for antigen recognition by NKT cells.

Degree: 2012, University of Melbourne

 NKT cells are a subset of T lymphocytes that influence a large array of immune responses ranging from cancer to autoimmune disease. The involvement of… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: NKT cells; glycolipids; T-cell receptor

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APA (6th Edition):

PELLICCI, D. G. (2012). The molecular and structural basis for antigen recognition by NKT cells. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Melbourne. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11343/38046

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

PELLICCI, DANIEL GRANT. “The molecular and structural basis for antigen recognition by NKT cells.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Melbourne. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11343/38046.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

PELLICCI, DANIEL GRANT. “The molecular and structural basis for antigen recognition by NKT cells.” 2012. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

PELLICCI DG. The molecular and structural basis for antigen recognition by NKT cells. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Melbourne; 2012. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11343/38046.

Council of Science Editors:

PELLICCI DG. The molecular and structural basis for antigen recognition by NKT cells. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Melbourne; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11343/38046


Loyola University Chicago

16. Ankney, Christian. Using Tcr Transgenic, Gp100 Reactive T Cells and Checkpoint Inhibition to Target Lymphangioleimyomatosis.

Degree: MS, Microbiology and Immunology, 2017, Loyola University Chicago

  Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a low-grade neoplastic disease affecting primarily women. It is characterized by cystic lung disease as well as renal and retroperitoneal tumors… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cancer; Immunotherapy; Lymphangioleiomyomatosis; T cell receptor; Oncology

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APA (6th Edition):

Ankney, C. (2017). Using Tcr Transgenic, Gp100 Reactive T Cells and Checkpoint Inhibition to Target Lymphangioleimyomatosis. (Thesis). Loyola University Chicago. Retrieved from https://ecommons.luc.edu/luc_theses/3660

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ankney, Christian. “Using Tcr Transgenic, Gp100 Reactive T Cells and Checkpoint Inhibition to Target Lymphangioleimyomatosis.” 2017. Thesis, Loyola University Chicago. Accessed March 03, 2021. https://ecommons.luc.edu/luc_theses/3660.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ankney, Christian. “Using Tcr Transgenic, Gp100 Reactive T Cells and Checkpoint Inhibition to Target Lymphangioleimyomatosis.” 2017. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Ankney C. Using Tcr Transgenic, Gp100 Reactive T Cells and Checkpoint Inhibition to Target Lymphangioleimyomatosis. [Internet] [Thesis]. Loyola University Chicago; 2017. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: https://ecommons.luc.edu/luc_theses/3660.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Ankney C. Using Tcr Transgenic, Gp100 Reactive T Cells and Checkpoint Inhibition to Target Lymphangioleimyomatosis. [Thesis]. Loyola University Chicago; 2017. Available from: https://ecommons.luc.edu/luc_theses/3660

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of New South Wales

17. Kurniawan, Monica. The prevalence of P-nucleotides in the expressed T cell receptor beta chain repertoire.

Degree: Centre for Vascular Research, 2012, University of New South Wales

T cells are a type of white blood cell that are able to recognise and kill virally infected cells. T cells have receptors on their… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: P-nucleotides; T cell receptor; P-addition

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APA (6th Edition):

Kurniawan, M. (2012). The prevalence of P-nucleotides in the expressed T cell receptor beta chain repertoire. (Masters Thesis). University of New South Wales. Retrieved from http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/52020 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:10690/SOURCE1?view=true

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kurniawan, Monica. “The prevalence of P-nucleotides in the expressed T cell receptor beta chain repertoire.” 2012. Masters Thesis, University of New South Wales. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/52020 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:10690/SOURCE1?view=true.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kurniawan, Monica. “The prevalence of P-nucleotides in the expressed T cell receptor beta chain repertoire.” 2012. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Kurniawan M. The prevalence of P-nucleotides in the expressed T cell receptor beta chain repertoire. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of New South Wales; 2012. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/52020 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:10690/SOURCE1?view=true.

Council of Science Editors:

Kurniawan M. The prevalence of P-nucleotides in the expressed T cell receptor beta chain repertoire. [Masters Thesis]. University of New South Wales; 2012. Available from: http://handle.unsw.edu.au/1959.4/52020 ; https://unsworks.unsw.edu.au/fapi/datastream/unsworks:10690/SOURCE1?view=true


University of Melbourne

18. CUKALAC, TANIA. Analysis of factors influencing CD8+ T cell responses after influenza A virus infection.

Degree: 2013, University of Melbourne

 CD8+ T cell responses to pathogens are characterised by the clonal expansion of cells expressing T cell receptors (TCRs) of unique specificity for antigenic peptide… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: immunology; CD8+ T cell; T cell receptors; cellular immunity; cell mediated immunity; virus infection; T cell receptor repertoires; T cell immunodominance

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APA (6th Edition):

CUKALAC, T. (2013). Analysis of factors influencing CD8+ T cell responses after influenza A virus infection. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Melbourne. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11343/38114

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

CUKALAC, TANIA. “Analysis of factors influencing CD8+ T cell responses after influenza A virus infection.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Melbourne. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11343/38114.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

CUKALAC, TANIA. “Analysis of factors influencing CD8+ T cell responses after influenza A virus infection.” 2013. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

CUKALAC T. Analysis of factors influencing CD8+ T cell responses after influenza A virus infection. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Melbourne; 2013. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11343/38114.

Council of Science Editors:

CUKALAC T. Analysis of factors influencing CD8+ T cell responses after influenza A virus infection. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Melbourne; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11343/38114

19. Robinot, Rémy. Lymphomes Natural-Killer T cells (NKT) : impact des stimulations antigéniques chroniques et mécanismes de la lymphomagénèse : Natural-Killer T cells (NKT) lymphomas : impact of chronic antigenic stimulations and mechanisms of lymphomagenesis.

Degree: Docteur es, Immunologie et cancérologie, 2017, Lyon

 Les lymphomes T périphériques (PTCL) sont des néoplasmes rares et agressifs représentant environ 12% des lymphomes chez l’Homme. Nos travaux récents dans des souris p53-/-… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Lymphomes T périphériques; Natural-Killer T cell; Borrelia burgdorferi; T-Cell Receptor; P53; Peripheral T-cell lymphomas; Natural-Killer T cells; Borrelia burgdorferi; T-Cell Receptor; P53; 616.99

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APA (6th Edition):

Robinot, R. (2017). Lymphomes Natural-Killer T cells (NKT) : impact des stimulations antigéniques chroniques et mécanismes de la lymphomagénèse : Natural-Killer T cells (NKT) lymphomas : impact of chronic antigenic stimulations and mechanisms of lymphomagenesis. (Doctoral Dissertation). Lyon. Retrieved from http://www.theses.fr/2017LYSE1255

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Robinot, Rémy. “Lymphomes Natural-Killer T cells (NKT) : impact des stimulations antigéniques chroniques et mécanismes de la lymphomagénèse : Natural-Killer T cells (NKT) lymphomas : impact of chronic antigenic stimulations and mechanisms of lymphomagenesis.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Lyon. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://www.theses.fr/2017LYSE1255.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Robinot, Rémy. “Lymphomes Natural-Killer T cells (NKT) : impact des stimulations antigéniques chroniques et mécanismes de la lymphomagénèse : Natural-Killer T cells (NKT) lymphomas : impact of chronic antigenic stimulations and mechanisms of lymphomagenesis.” 2017. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Robinot R. Lymphomes Natural-Killer T cells (NKT) : impact des stimulations antigéniques chroniques et mécanismes de la lymphomagénèse : Natural-Killer T cells (NKT) lymphomas : impact of chronic antigenic stimulations and mechanisms of lymphomagenesis. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Lyon; 2017. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://www.theses.fr/2017LYSE1255.

Council of Science Editors:

Robinot R. Lymphomes Natural-Killer T cells (NKT) : impact des stimulations antigéniques chroniques et mécanismes de la lymphomagénèse : Natural-Killer T cells (NKT) lymphomas : impact of chronic antigenic stimulations and mechanisms of lymphomagenesis. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Lyon; 2017. Available from: http://www.theses.fr/2017LYSE1255


University of Toronto

20. Cruz Tleugabulova, Mayra. Signaling Regulation of iNKT Cell Development and Function.

Degree: PhD, 2017, University of Toronto

 Beyond their potential as immunotherapeutic targets, invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells have long interested immunologists because they defy the rules of T cell development… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: immune receptor; Intracellular signaling; Natural Killer T cell; T cell development; T cell receptor; Thymus; 0982

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APA (6th Edition):

Cruz Tleugabulova, M. (2017). Signaling Regulation of iNKT Cell Development and Function. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/80647

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cruz Tleugabulova, Mayra. “Signaling Regulation of iNKT Cell Development and Function.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/80647.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cruz Tleugabulova, Mayra. “Signaling Regulation of iNKT Cell Development and Function.” 2017. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Cruz Tleugabulova M. Signaling Regulation of iNKT Cell Development and Function. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2017. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/80647.

Council of Science Editors:

Cruz Tleugabulova M. Signaling Regulation of iNKT Cell Development and Function. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/80647


University of Edinburgh

21. Li, Xiaoying. T cell receptor repertoires of immunodominant CD8 T cell responses to Theileria parva.

Degree: PhD, 2015, University of Edinburgh

 Previous research has provided evidence that CD8 T cells mediate immunity against infection with Theileria parva. However, the immunity induced by one parasite strain doesn‟t(more)

Subjects/Keywords: 616.07; T cell receptor; immunodominant; CD8 T cells; Theileria parva

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APA (6th Edition):

Li, X. (2015). T cell receptor repertoires of immunodominant CD8 T cell responses to Theileria parva. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Edinburgh. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1842/19552

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Li, Xiaoying. “T cell receptor repertoires of immunodominant CD8 T cell responses to Theileria parva.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Edinburgh. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1842/19552.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Li, Xiaoying. “T cell receptor repertoires of immunodominant CD8 T cell responses to Theileria parva.” 2015. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Li X. T cell receptor repertoires of immunodominant CD8 T cell responses to Theileria parva. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Edinburgh; 2015. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/19552.

Council of Science Editors:

Li X. T cell receptor repertoires of immunodominant CD8 T cell responses to Theileria parva. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Edinburgh; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/19552


Boston University

22. Pedro, Kyle D. Cell-to-cell transmission and intrinsic mechanisms that influence human immunodeficiency virus infection.

Degree: PhD, Microbiology, 2020, Boston University

 Early in the course of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection a population of latently infected cells is established which persists despite long-term anti-retroviral treatment. This… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Microbiology; CD4+ T cell; Chimeric antigen receptor; Dendritic cell; HIV latency; HIV transcription; T cell receptor signaling

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APA (6th Edition):

Pedro, K. D. (2020). Cell-to-cell transmission and intrinsic mechanisms that influence human immunodeficiency virus infection. (Doctoral Dissertation). Boston University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2144/42067

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pedro, Kyle D. “Cell-to-cell transmission and intrinsic mechanisms that influence human immunodeficiency virus infection.” 2020. Doctoral Dissertation, Boston University. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2144/42067.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pedro, Kyle D. “Cell-to-cell transmission and intrinsic mechanisms that influence human immunodeficiency virus infection.” 2020. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Pedro KD. Cell-to-cell transmission and intrinsic mechanisms that influence human immunodeficiency virus infection. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Boston University; 2020. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2144/42067.

Council of Science Editors:

Pedro KD. Cell-to-cell transmission and intrinsic mechanisms that influence human immunodeficiency virus infection. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Boston University; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2144/42067

23. Nakazawa, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Park, Young Soo; Motoyama, Yasushi; Hironaka, Yasuo; Nishimura, Fumihiko; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Yamada, Shuichi; Matsuda, Ryosuke; Tamura, Kentaro; Sugimoto, Tadashi; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Marutani, Akiko; Tsujimura, Takahiro; Ouji, Noriko; Ouji, Yukiteru; Yoshikawa, Masahide. Cytotoxic human peripheral blood-derived γδT cells kill glioblastoma cell lines: implications for cell-based immunotherapy for patients with glioblastoma. : ヒト細胞傷害性γδT細胞は膠芽腫細胞株を殺傷する:膠芽腫患者に対する免疫細胞治療の意義.

Degree: 博士(医学), 2015, Nara Medical University / 奈良県立医科大学

Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly aggressive brain tumor for which novel therapeutic approaches, such as immunotherapy, are urgently needed. Zoledronate (ZOL), an inhibitor of osteoclastic… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: γδT cell; Zoledronate; Glioblastoma; Cytotoxicity; Immunotherapy; T-cell receptor

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APA (6th Edition):

Nakazawa, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Park, Young Soo; Motoyama, Yasushi; Hironaka, Yasuo; Nishimura, Fumihiko; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Yamada, Shuichi; Matsuda, Ryosuke; Tamura, Kentaro; Sugimoto, Tadashi; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Marutani, Akiko; Tsujimura, Takahiro; Ouji, Noriko; Ouji, Yukiteru; Yoshikawa, M. (2015). Cytotoxic human peripheral blood-derived γδT cells kill glioblastoma cell lines: implications for cell-based immunotherapy for patients with glioblastoma. : ヒト細胞傷害性γδT細胞は膠芽腫細胞株を殺傷する:膠芽腫患者に対する免疫細胞治療の意義. (Thesis). Nara Medical University / 奈良県立医科大学. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10564/3068

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nakazawa, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Park, Young Soo; Motoyama, Yasushi; Hironaka, Yasuo; Nishimura, Fumihiko; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Yamada, Shuichi; Matsuda, Ryosuke; Tamura, Kentaro; Sugimoto, Tadashi; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Marutani, Akiko; Tsujimura, Takahiro; Ouji, Noriko; Ouji, Yukiteru; Yoshikawa, Masahide. “Cytotoxic human peripheral blood-derived γδT cells kill glioblastoma cell lines: implications for cell-based immunotherapy for patients with glioblastoma. : ヒト細胞傷害性γδT細胞は膠芽腫細胞株を殺傷する:膠芽腫患者に対する免疫細胞治療の意義.” 2015. Thesis, Nara Medical University / 奈良県立医科大学. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10564/3068.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nakazawa, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Park, Young Soo; Motoyama, Yasushi; Hironaka, Yasuo; Nishimura, Fumihiko; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Yamada, Shuichi; Matsuda, Ryosuke; Tamura, Kentaro; Sugimoto, Tadashi; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Marutani, Akiko; Tsujimura, Takahiro; Ouji, Noriko; Ouji, Yukiteru; Yoshikawa, Masahide. “Cytotoxic human peripheral blood-derived γδT cells kill glioblastoma cell lines: implications for cell-based immunotherapy for patients with glioblastoma. : ヒト細胞傷害性γδT細胞は膠芽腫細胞株を殺傷する:膠芽腫患者に対する免疫細胞治療の意義.” 2015. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Nakazawa, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Park, Young Soo; Motoyama, Yasushi; Hironaka, Yasuo; Nishimura, Fumihiko; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Yamada, Shuichi; Matsuda, Ryosuke; Tamura, Kentaro; Sugimoto, Tadashi; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Marutani, Akiko; Tsujimura, Takahiro; Ouji, Noriko; Ouji, Yukiteru; Yoshikawa M. Cytotoxic human peripheral blood-derived γδT cells kill glioblastoma cell lines: implications for cell-based immunotherapy for patients with glioblastoma. : ヒト細胞傷害性γδT細胞は膠芽腫細胞株を殺傷する:膠芽腫患者に対する免疫細胞治療の意義. [Internet] [Thesis]. Nara Medical University / 奈良県立医科大学; 2015. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10564/3068.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Nakazawa, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Park, Young Soo; Motoyama, Yasushi; Hironaka, Yasuo; Nishimura, Fumihiko; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Yamada, Shuichi; Matsuda, Ryosuke; Tamura, Kentaro; Sugimoto, Tadashi; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Marutani, Akiko; Tsujimura, Takahiro; Ouji, Noriko; Ouji, Yukiteru; Yoshikawa M. Cytotoxic human peripheral blood-derived γδT cells kill glioblastoma cell lines: implications for cell-based immunotherapy for patients with glioblastoma. : ヒト細胞傷害性γδT細胞は膠芽腫細胞株を殺傷する:膠芽腫患者に対する免疫細胞治療の意義. [Thesis]. Nara Medical University / 奈良県立医科大学; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10564/3068

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of California – Berkeley

24. Fay, Nicole Cheung. Spatiotemporal receptor dynamics during early T cell signaling.

Degree: Molecular & Cell Biology, 2014, University of California – Berkeley

 A given T cell receptor (TCR) can robustly discern a pathogen-derived agonist peptide amidst a myriad of background peptides, all bound to major histocompatibility complexes… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Molecular biology; Immunology; Biophysics; antigen recognition; CD28; CD80; costimulation; T cell; T cell receptor (TCR)

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APA (6th Edition):

Fay, N. C. (2014). Spatiotemporal receptor dynamics during early T cell signaling. (Thesis). University of California – Berkeley. Retrieved from http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/6pk117x3

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fay, Nicole Cheung. “Spatiotemporal receptor dynamics during early T cell signaling.” 2014. Thesis, University of California – Berkeley. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/6pk117x3.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fay, Nicole Cheung. “Spatiotemporal receptor dynamics during early T cell signaling.” 2014. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Fay NC. Spatiotemporal receptor dynamics during early T cell signaling. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of California – Berkeley; 2014. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/6pk117x3.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Fay NC. Spatiotemporal receptor dynamics during early T cell signaling. [Thesis]. University of California – Berkeley; 2014. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/6pk117x3

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Harvard University

25. Osuna-Gutierrez, Christa Elyse. Characterization of the Mamu-A*01-Restricted CD8-Positive T Lymphocyte Immunodominance Hierarchy in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Rhesus Monkeys.

Degree: PhD, Immunology, 2012, Harvard University

 (CD8+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play a critical role in controlling human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replication. The CTL responses that… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: CD8 T cell; differentiation; HIV; SIV; T cell receptor; vaccine; immunology; molecular biology; virology

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APA (6th Edition):

Osuna-Gutierrez, C. E. (2012). Characterization of the Mamu-A*01-Restricted CD8-Positive T Lymphocyte Immunodominance Hierarchy in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Rhesus Monkeys. (Doctoral Dissertation). Harvard University. Retrieved from http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:9817660

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Osuna-Gutierrez, Christa Elyse. “Characterization of the Mamu-A*01-Restricted CD8-Positive T Lymphocyte Immunodominance Hierarchy in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Rhesus Monkeys.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Harvard University. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:9817660.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Osuna-Gutierrez, Christa Elyse. “Characterization of the Mamu-A*01-Restricted CD8-Positive T Lymphocyte Immunodominance Hierarchy in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Rhesus Monkeys.” 2012. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Osuna-Gutierrez CE. Characterization of the Mamu-A*01-Restricted CD8-Positive T Lymphocyte Immunodominance Hierarchy in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Rhesus Monkeys. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Harvard University; 2012. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:9817660.

Council of Science Editors:

Osuna-Gutierrez CE. Characterization of the Mamu-A*01-Restricted CD8-Positive T Lymphocyte Immunodominance Hierarchy in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Rhesus Monkeys. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Harvard University; 2012. Available from: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:9817660


Harvard University

26. Kolodin, Dmitriy Pavlovich. Dynamics of Tissue-Resident Regulatory T Cell Populations.

Degree: PhD, Biology: Medical Sciences, Division of, 2014, Harvard University

 In recent years, there has been a worldwide increase in obesity, which parallels a rise in pathologies, including type 2 diabetes, collectively termed the metabolic… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Immunology; Adipose tissue; CD4 T cell; Foxp3; Obesity; T cell receptor; Treg

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APA (6th Edition):

Kolodin, D. P. (2014). Dynamics of Tissue-Resident Regulatory T Cell Populations. (Doctoral Dissertation). Harvard University. Retrieved from http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12274338

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kolodin, Dmitriy Pavlovich. “Dynamics of Tissue-Resident Regulatory T Cell Populations.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Harvard University. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12274338.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kolodin, Dmitriy Pavlovich. “Dynamics of Tissue-Resident Regulatory T Cell Populations.” 2014. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Kolodin DP. Dynamics of Tissue-Resident Regulatory T Cell Populations. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Harvard University; 2014. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12274338.

Council of Science Editors:

Kolodin DP. Dynamics of Tissue-Resident Regulatory T Cell Populations. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Harvard University; 2014. Available from: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:12274338


University of Melbourne

27. Day, Ella Bridie. A structural and functional analysis of T cell receptor recognition and its consequences for virus infection.

Degree: 2011, University of Melbourne

 CD8+ T cell responses to pathogens are characterised by the clonal expansion of cells expressing T cell receptors (TCRs) that are specific for epitopes of… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: immunology; cell mediated immunity; virus infection; T cells; T cell receptor repertoires

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APA (6th Edition):

Day, E. B. (2011). A structural and functional analysis of T cell receptor recognition and its consequences for virus infection. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Melbourne. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11343/37025

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Day, Ella Bridie. “A structural and functional analysis of T cell receptor recognition and its consequences for virus infection.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Melbourne. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11343/37025.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Day, Ella Bridie. “A structural and functional analysis of T cell receptor recognition and its consequences for virus infection.” 2011. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Day EB. A structural and functional analysis of T cell receptor recognition and its consequences for virus infection. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Melbourne; 2011. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11343/37025.

Council of Science Editors:

Day EB. A structural and functional analysis of T cell receptor recognition and its consequences for virus infection. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Melbourne; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11343/37025


University of Melbourne

28. Davenport, Alexander. Investigating the functional biology of chimeric antigen receptor T cells.

Degree: 2017, University of Melbourne

 Despite the success of autologous chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells to treat patients with refractory B cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, (ALL) and lymphoma, there… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: immunology; cancer immunology; immunotherapy; cancer; CAR; chimeric antigen receptor; T cell; CAR T cell

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APA (6th Edition):

Davenport, A. (2017). Investigating the functional biology of chimeric antigen receptor T cells. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Melbourne. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11343/137338

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Davenport, Alexander. “Investigating the functional biology of chimeric antigen receptor T cells.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Melbourne. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11343/137338.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Davenport, Alexander. “Investigating the functional biology of chimeric antigen receptor T cells.” 2017. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Davenport A. Investigating the functional biology of chimeric antigen receptor T cells. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Melbourne; 2017. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11343/137338.

Council of Science Editors:

Davenport A. Investigating the functional biology of chimeric antigen receptor T cells. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Melbourne; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11343/137338


Arizona State University

29. Hirneise, Gabrielle Rachel. Developing a CRISPR-Mediated Knockout TCR Human T Cell Line for Use in Cloning Antigen-Specific T Cell Receptors.

Degree: Biology, 2020, Arizona State University

 Adoptive transfer of T cells engineered to express synthetic antigen-specific T cell receptors (TCRs) has provocative therapeutic applications for treating cancer. However, expressing these synthetic… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biology; Cellular biology; Cancer; CRISPR; Immunology; Immunotherapies; T cell; T cell receptor

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APA (6th Edition):

Hirneise, G. R. (2020). Developing a CRISPR-Mediated Knockout TCR Human T Cell Line for Use in Cloning Antigen-Specific T Cell Receptors. (Masters Thesis). Arizona State University. Retrieved from http://repository.asu.edu/items/57440

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hirneise, Gabrielle Rachel. “Developing a CRISPR-Mediated Knockout TCR Human T Cell Line for Use in Cloning Antigen-Specific T Cell Receptors.” 2020. Masters Thesis, Arizona State University. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://repository.asu.edu/items/57440.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hirneise, Gabrielle Rachel. “Developing a CRISPR-Mediated Knockout TCR Human T Cell Line for Use in Cloning Antigen-Specific T Cell Receptors.” 2020. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Hirneise GR. Developing a CRISPR-Mediated Knockout TCR Human T Cell Line for Use in Cloning Antigen-Specific T Cell Receptors. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Arizona State University; 2020. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://repository.asu.edu/items/57440.

Council of Science Editors:

Hirneise GR. Developing a CRISPR-Mediated Knockout TCR Human T Cell Line for Use in Cloning Antigen-Specific T Cell Receptors. [Masters Thesis]. Arizona State University; 2020. Available from: http://repository.asu.edu/items/57440

30. Strainic, Michael George, Jr. THE ABSENCE OF C3AR AND C5AR SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PROMOTES T REGULATORY CELL DIFFERENTIATION AND REGULATES IMMUNOLOGIC TOLERANCE.

Degree: PhD, Pathology, 2013, Case Western Reserve University School of Graduate Studies

 Here, we demonstrate that when C3aR and C5aR signals are not transduced into CD4+ T cells, PI-3K¿-AKT-mTOR signaling ceases, PKA activation increases, auto-inductive TGF-ß1 signaling… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Immunology; C3aR; C5aR; DAF; CD55; T cell activation; T cell; T regulatory cell; Treg; T cell suppression; Treg induction; complement; complement mediated T cell activation; G-protein coupled receptor; Foxp3

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APA (6th Edition):

Strainic, Michael George, J. (2013). THE ABSENCE OF C3AR AND C5AR SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PROMOTES T REGULATORY CELL DIFFERENTIATION AND REGULATES IMMUNOLOGIC TOLERANCE. (Doctoral Dissertation). Case Western Reserve University School of Graduate Studies. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=case1363707372

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Strainic, Michael George, Jr. “THE ABSENCE OF C3AR AND C5AR SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PROMOTES T REGULATORY CELL DIFFERENTIATION AND REGULATES IMMUNOLOGIC TOLERANCE.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Case Western Reserve University School of Graduate Studies. Accessed March 03, 2021. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=case1363707372.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Strainic, Michael George, Jr. “THE ABSENCE OF C3AR AND C5AR SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PROMOTES T REGULATORY CELL DIFFERENTIATION AND REGULATES IMMUNOLOGIC TOLERANCE.” 2013. Web. 03 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Strainic, Michael George J. THE ABSENCE OF C3AR AND C5AR SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PROMOTES T REGULATORY CELL DIFFERENTIATION AND REGULATES IMMUNOLOGIC TOLERANCE. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Case Western Reserve University School of Graduate Studies; 2013. [cited 2021 Mar 03]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=case1363707372.

Council of Science Editors:

Strainic, Michael George J. THE ABSENCE OF C3AR AND C5AR SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PROMOTES T REGULATORY CELL DIFFERENTIATION AND REGULATES IMMUNOLOGIC TOLERANCE. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Case Western Reserve University School of Graduate Studies; 2013. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=case1363707372

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