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You searched for subject:(Swine Lagoon Effluent). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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North Carolina State University

1. Iyyemperumal, Kannan. Soil Microbial Properties and Nitrogen Cycling in Forage Production Systems Receiving Swine Lagoon Effluent.

Degree: PhD, Soil Science, 2006, North Carolina State University

Land application of swine lagoon effluent (SLE) is widespread in the southeastern USA. As a surrogate of synthetic N fertilizer, SLE is applied to forage crops primarily based on requirement of plant yield and of dry matter quality such as protein and fiber contents. Although soil microorganisms play a central role in soil N turnover, retention and therefore the environmental fate of soil and fertilizer N, the response of soil microbial communities to SLE application has received little attention. In this study, soil microbial properties in forage production systems receiving swine lagoon effluent were examined at both organismal and process levels. The specific objectives of this research were to (1) determine microbial community structure and catabolic function; (2) assess soil enzyme activities involved in C, N and P cycling; (3) quantify soil N mineralization, immobilization and nitrification; and (4) link the changes in microbial community with soil properties as a consequence of contrasting N fertilization (SLE versus a synthetic N fertilizer) or of contrasting forage management practices (hay production versus cattle grazing). A holistic delineation may improve our understanding of microbial ecology in managed forage production systems and accordingly facilitate best management practices, in particular N fertilization. Soil microbial biomass, activity and rates of N transformation were heterogeneous in a grazed pasture, due mainly to non-uniform distribution of animal excreta. While soil microbial biomass, respiration activity and net N mineralization were positively correlated with the concentration of animal excreta and associated changes in soil C and N (P < 0.05, Pearson correlation coefficient r ≈ 0.70), gross N mineralization and nitrification potential were not. This difference indicates that soil microbial community and its mediated processes may not respond linearly to N and C availability. Soil microbial community structure and functions were therefore examined in a hay production system supplied either SLE or ammonium nitrate (AN) at application rates of 0, 200, 400 or 600 kg plant available N ha-1 yr-1. Microbial biomass, respiration activity and net N mineralization peaked at the application rate of 200 or 400 kg available N ha-1 yr-1. Activities of several hydrolytic enzymes involved in C and N cycling were also highest at the application rate of 200 or 400 kg available N ha-1 yr-1. However, oxidative soil enzymes including phenol oxidase and peroxidase activity were positively correlated with the application rates of SLE (P < 0.05), but not AN, suggesting that SLE and AN differed in their influence on soil microbial community or its mediated processes. Indeed, fingerprinting of phospholipid fatty acids and community-level physiology showed that microbial community composition differed between soils fertilized with SLE versus AN. The differences in microbial community and its mediated processes were highly correlated with soil pH. This research implies that as a consequence of… Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Wei Shi, Committee Chair (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Forage systems; Swine Lagoon Effluent; Enzymes; Microbial community; Microbial biomass; N transformations

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Iyyemperumal, K. (2006). Soil Microbial Properties and Nitrogen Cycling in Forage Production Systems Receiving Swine Lagoon Effluent. (Doctoral Dissertation). North Carolina State University. Retrieved from http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/4936

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Iyyemperumal, Kannan. “Soil Microbial Properties and Nitrogen Cycling in Forage Production Systems Receiving Swine Lagoon Effluent.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, North Carolina State University. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/4936.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Iyyemperumal, Kannan. “Soil Microbial Properties and Nitrogen Cycling in Forage Production Systems Receiving Swine Lagoon Effluent.” 2006. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Iyyemperumal K. Soil Microbial Properties and Nitrogen Cycling in Forage Production Systems Receiving Swine Lagoon Effluent. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. North Carolina State University; 2006. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/4936.

Council of Science Editors:

Iyyemperumal K. Soil Microbial Properties and Nitrogen Cycling in Forage Production Systems Receiving Swine Lagoon Effluent. [Doctoral Dissertation]. North Carolina State University; 2006. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/4936


North Carolina State University

2. Nelson, Nathan Ormond. Soil and Waste Management Effects on Phosphorus Leaching in Acid Sandy Soils of the North Carolina Coastal Plain.

Degree: PhD, Soil Science, 2004, North Carolina State University

Excess phosphorus applied to soils with low P adsorption capacities can potentially enter surface water via leaching and subsurface transport, thereby negatively impacting surface water quality. Currently proposed best management practices for inhibition of P leaching are limited to reducing the P application rates, which can decrease the economic viability of animal producers. The protection of water quality and sustainability of animal production are dependent on accurate descriptions of waste and soil management effects on P leaching. Development of new best management practices will benefit both the environment and animal producers. This requires further data and research to adequately describe the risk of P loss via leaching and determine the effects of new best management practices on P leaching. The objectives of this research are to: 1) monitor P concentrations in the soil solution of soils with long-term histories of swine lagoon effluent application and relate these P concentrations to easily quantifiable soil properties, 2) modify the GLEAMS (Groundwater Loading Effects of Agricultural Management Systems) model P subroutines to more accurately reflect P sorption/desorption and validate the modified model with collected field data, 3) use the validated version of GLEAMS to determine cropping system and waste management effects on long-term P leaching losses, and 4) evaluate the use of alum (Al₂(SO₄)₃·14H₂O) additions to soil and waste as a best management practice to reduce P leaching. Soil solution P concentrations were monitored at 45, 90, and 135 cm depths for 20 months in Autryville and Blanton soils under grazed pasture that had received swine waste for more than 20 years. Maximum soil solution P concentrations at 45 cm were in excess of 18 mg L⁻¹ in both soils. Soil solution P concentrations at 90 cm in the Blanton soil were similar to that at 45 cm, indicating low P sorption. However, soil solution P concentrations at 90 cm in the Autryville soil averaged 0.05 mg L⁻¹ compared to 10 mg L⁻¹ at 45 cm. A split-line model related soil solution P concentration to the degree of P saturation (DPS), identifying a change point at 45% DPS. Phosphorus leaching losses were as high as 100 kg ha⁻¹[superscript yr]⁻¹ passing through 45 cm in the Autryville soil but less than 1 kg ha⁻¹[superscript yr]⁻¹ passing through 135 cm. Modifying GLEAMS with the Langmuir equation to partition labile P between adsorbed and solution phases improved predictions of percolate P concentrations and soil P accumulation and increased model sensitivity to changes in crop and P management. Phosphorus-based waste applications decreased predicted P leaching by 20 kg ha⁻¹[superscript yr] ⁻¹ compared to N-based waste applications. Eliminating all P applications decreased the predicted P leaching losses by less than 1 kg ha⁻¹[superscript yr]⁻¹ compared to P-based waste… Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. J. Wendell Gilliam, Committee Co-Chair (advisor), Dr. Robert L Mikkelsen, Committee Co-Chair (advisor), Dr. John E. Parsons, Committee Member (advisor), Dr. R. Wanye Skaggs, Committee Member (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: GLEAMS; Phosphorus Leaching; Alum; Poultry Litter; Swine Lagoon Effluent; computer simulation modeling; soil solution monitoring

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nelson, N. O. (2004). Soil and Waste Management Effects on Phosphorus Leaching in Acid Sandy Soils of the North Carolina Coastal Plain. (Doctoral Dissertation). North Carolina State University. Retrieved from http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/3656

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nelson, Nathan Ormond. “Soil and Waste Management Effects on Phosphorus Leaching in Acid Sandy Soils of the North Carolina Coastal Plain.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, North Carolina State University. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/3656.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nelson, Nathan Ormond. “Soil and Waste Management Effects on Phosphorus Leaching in Acid Sandy Soils of the North Carolina Coastal Plain.” 2004. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Nelson NO. Soil and Waste Management Effects on Phosphorus Leaching in Acid Sandy Soils of the North Carolina Coastal Plain. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. North Carolina State University; 2004. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/3656.

Council of Science Editors:

Nelson NO. Soil and Waste Management Effects on Phosphorus Leaching in Acid Sandy Soils of the North Carolina Coastal Plain. [Doctoral Dissertation]. North Carolina State University; 2004. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/3656


North Carolina State University

3. Balla, Biswa Kumar. Determining Plant-Available Nitrogen in Hog Anaerobic Lagoon Effluent Applied with Traveling Gun and Drag Hose Systems.

Degree: MS, Biological and Agricultural Engineering, 2007, North Carolina State University

Subjects/Keywords: ammonia; land application; swine or hog; nitrogen; nutrient; traveling gun; drag hose; lagoon effluent

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Balla, B. K. (2007). Determining Plant-Available Nitrogen in Hog Anaerobic Lagoon Effluent Applied with Traveling Gun and Drag Hose Systems. (Thesis). North Carolina State University. Retrieved from http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/1387

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Balla, Biswa Kumar. “Determining Plant-Available Nitrogen in Hog Anaerobic Lagoon Effluent Applied with Traveling Gun and Drag Hose Systems.” 2007. Thesis, North Carolina State University. Accessed October 17, 2019. http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/1387.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Balla, Biswa Kumar. “Determining Plant-Available Nitrogen in Hog Anaerobic Lagoon Effluent Applied with Traveling Gun and Drag Hose Systems.” 2007. Web. 17 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Balla BK. Determining Plant-Available Nitrogen in Hog Anaerobic Lagoon Effluent Applied with Traveling Gun and Drag Hose Systems. [Internet] [Thesis]. North Carolina State University; 2007. [cited 2019 Oct 17]. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/1387.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Balla BK. Determining Plant-Available Nitrogen in Hog Anaerobic Lagoon Effluent Applied with Traveling Gun and Drag Hose Systems. [Thesis]. North Carolina State University; 2007. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/1387

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.