Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(Supplementation frequency). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


North Carolina State University

1. Drewnoski, Mary Elizabeth. Understanding the Effect of Reduced Supplementation Frequency on Performance, Digestion and Metabolism of Stocker Cattle.

Degree: PhD, Nutrition, 2009, North Carolina State University

Supplements are often fed to stocker cattle on forage-based diets to improve animal performance. Delivery costs can make up a substantial portion of the cost of supplementation. Reducing supplementation frequency can reduce labor and equipment costs and therefore has the potential to increase profit. However, less frequent feeding requires feeding larger quantities of supplement at once and can increase the likelihood of negative associative effects of supplementation. Additionally, little is understood about the metabolic response of ruminants to large fluxuation in nutrient intake. A 50:50 blend of soyhulls and corn gluten feed is widely used by producers to supplement growing cattle. This blend is high in energy but low in starch. It also contains a moderate amount of protein, much of which is ruminally degradable. The purpose of this research was to determine the effect of reducing supplementation frequency of a soybean hull and corn gluten feed blend on performance, digestion, and concentrations of metabolites and hormonal growth regulators in blood of steers. In Experiment 1, growing steers consuming medium quality fescue hay were supplemented either daily, 3 times a week, or 2 times a week. Hay intake was decreased by reducing supplementation frequency but gains were not affected. As a result, the feed to gain ratio increased slightly with less frequent supplementation. In Experiment 2, six ruminally cannulated steers consuming medium quality fescue hay were used in a replicated 3 x 3 Latin square to determine the effect of supplement frequency (daily at 1% BW or on alternate days at 2% BW) on digestion and ruminal parameters. Reducing supplementation frequency decreased hay intake but did not affect digestibility of the diet. On the day of supplementation molar proportions both of propionate and butyrate in the rumen of steers supplemented on alternate days was increased compared to those supplemented daily. In Experiment 3, growing steers were individually fed medium quality hay and supplemented daily (1% BW) or on alternate days (2% BW). Gains did not differ due to supplementation frequency. However, plasma IGF-1 was greater and insulin tended to be greater in steers supplemented less frequently. Advisors/Committee Members: Gerald Huntington, Committee Co-Chair (advisor), Geoff Benson, Committee Member (advisor), Matthew Poore, Committee Co-Chair (advisor), Vivek Fellnar, Committee Member (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Supplementation frequency; steers

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Drewnoski, M. E. (2009). Understanding the Effect of Reduced Supplementation Frequency on Performance, Digestion and Metabolism of Stocker Cattle. (Doctoral Dissertation). North Carolina State University. Retrieved from http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/5273

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Drewnoski, Mary Elizabeth. “Understanding the Effect of Reduced Supplementation Frequency on Performance, Digestion and Metabolism of Stocker Cattle.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, North Carolina State University. Accessed January 22, 2021. http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/5273.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Drewnoski, Mary Elizabeth. “Understanding the Effect of Reduced Supplementation Frequency on Performance, Digestion and Metabolism of Stocker Cattle.” 2009. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Drewnoski ME. Understanding the Effect of Reduced Supplementation Frequency on Performance, Digestion and Metabolism of Stocker Cattle. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. North Carolina State University; 2009. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/5273.

Council of Science Editors:

Drewnoski ME. Understanding the Effect of Reduced Supplementation Frequency on Performance, Digestion and Metabolism of Stocker Cattle. [Doctoral Dissertation]. North Carolina State University; 2009. Available from: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/5273

2. Bennett, Bradley Wayne. The effects of nutrition and reproductive strategies on performance of beef cattle grazing native shortgrass range in western Kansas.

Degree: MS, Department of Animal Sciences and Industry, 2013, Kansas State University

Cattle grazing dormant native range (< 7% crude protein; CP) require supplementation of additional protein to sustain body weight (BW) and body condition score (BCS). Daily delivery of these supplements is an economic burden to cattle producers faced with challenging economic circumstances. Supplementing cows infrequently (as little as once/week) has produced equivalent BW and BCS changes compared to daily delivery. Dried distiller’s grains with solubles (DDGS) provides more ruminally-undegradable protein (RUP; 50-60%) compared to traditional oilseed-meal supplements (i.e. soybean meal) that are >50% ruminally-degradable protein (RDP). Therefore, our objective was to evaluate the effects of supplementation frequency on performance, reproductive success, eating behavior, and subsequent calf performance of spring-calving cows supplemented with DDGS. No differences in ending BW (P = 0.69) and BCS (P = 0.49), or changes in BW and BCS over the supplementation period (P = 0.82 and 0.70, respectively) were observed among cows supplemented every d, every 3 d, or every 6 d. Calf BW at birth, weaning weight (WW), and average daily gain (ADG) were similar among treatments (P = 0.19, 0.12, and 0.10, respectively). First-service conception rate (FSCR) and final pregnancy rate (PR) were also not affected by supplementation frequency (P = 0.62 and 0.76, respectively). The development of replacement heifers is a large expense for cow-calf producers. Improved breeding and heifer development strategies aimed at ensuring the success of replacement females have been developed but reproductive failure still remains a problem. The stress associated with breeding and handling procedures may decrease reproductive success. Therefore, the objective was to determine if intramuscular administration of flunixin meglumine (1.1 mg/kg BW) 14 days post-breeding would improve FSCR and PR in non-transported replacement heifers. Under the conditions of our study, flunixin meglumine did not improve (P = 0.87) first service conception rate above that of control heifers (41.2% and 42.3%, respectively). Final pregnancy rate also was not different between treatments and averaged 81.8% (P = 0.40). Advisors/Committee Members: John Jaeger.

Subjects/Keywords: Supplementation frequency; Dried distiller's grains; Flunixin meglumine; Beef cows; Beef heifers; Animal Sciences (0475)

…effect of supplementation frequency on OMI, NDFD, and N digestibility in both wethers and… …2010. Effects of ruminal protein degradability and frequency of supplementation on site and… …supplementation frequency of steers consuming low-quality forage. I. Site of digestion and microbial… …Influence of rumen protein degradability and supplementation frequency on performance and nitrogen… …of protein supplementation frequency on cows consuming low-quality forage: Performance… 

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Sample image

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bennett, B. W. (2013). The effects of nutrition and reproductive strategies on performance of beef cattle grazing native shortgrass range in western Kansas. (Masters Thesis). Kansas State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2097/16294

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bennett, Bradley Wayne. “The effects of nutrition and reproductive strategies on performance of beef cattle grazing native shortgrass range in western Kansas.” 2013. Masters Thesis, Kansas State University. Accessed January 22, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2097/16294.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bennett, Bradley Wayne. “The effects of nutrition and reproductive strategies on performance of beef cattle grazing native shortgrass range in western Kansas.” 2013. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Bennett BW. The effects of nutrition and reproductive strategies on performance of beef cattle grazing native shortgrass range in western Kansas. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Kansas State University; 2013. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/16294.

Council of Science Editors:

Bennett BW. The effects of nutrition and reproductive strategies on performance of beef cattle grazing native shortgrass range in western Kansas. [Masters Thesis]. Kansas State University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2097/16294

3. Garcia Ascolani, Mariana Eloisa. Supplementation Strategies to Enhance Beef Cattle Production Efficiency.

Degree: MS, Animal Sciences, 2016, University of Florida

An experiment evaluated the effects of different frequencies of supplementation with CGF and Megalac-R (Church & Dwight, Princeton, NJ), on the blood profile of suckled beef cows. Cows receiving equal amounts of an isocaloric and isonitrogenous supplement 3, 5, or 7 d/wk had similar concentrations of NEFA (P = 0.42) and BUN (P = 0.74). Reducing the frequency of supplementation did not affect the metabolism of lactating beef cows and could contribute to reduce costs. Inclusion rates of Fermenten (Church & Dwight, Princeton, NJ) were evaluated on performance and metabolism of steers. A first experiment tested the effects of 0, 2, and 4% inclusion rate of Fermenten in the diet DM on performance of steers. After 56 d under treatment, steers in the 4% treatment had decreased BW (P = 0.01), ADG (P 0.05) on carcass or blood parameters. Greater inclusion rate of Fermenten resulted in increased (P 0.05) was observed. In conclusion, Fermenten did not improve performance or metabolism of growing cattle. ( en ) Advisors/Committee Members: DILORENZO,NICOLAS (committee chair), DUBEUX,JOSE CARLOS (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Amino acids; Beef cattle; Blood urea nitrogen; Calves; Fats; Forage; Heifers; Nonesterified fatty acids; Rumen; Soybeans; additive  – beef  – cattle  – feed  – fermenten  – frequency  – megalac  – supplementation

…BUN (P = 0.74). Reducing the frequency of supplementation did not affect the… …of quality feed to the animals. For that reason, frequency of supplementation and type and… …of the fibrolytic bacteria (Kunkle et al., 2000) Frequency of Supplementation… …Klein et al., 2014). Reducing 17 frequency of supplementation should help to decrease… …reduction in the frequency of supplementation could affect nutrient intake and the concentration… 

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Garcia Ascolani, M. E. (2016). Supplementation Strategies to Enhance Beef Cattle Production Efficiency. (Masters Thesis). University of Florida. Retrieved from https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0050442

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Garcia Ascolani, Mariana Eloisa. “Supplementation Strategies to Enhance Beef Cattle Production Efficiency.” 2016. Masters Thesis, University of Florida. Accessed January 22, 2021. https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0050442.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Garcia Ascolani, Mariana Eloisa. “Supplementation Strategies to Enhance Beef Cattle Production Efficiency.” 2016. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Garcia Ascolani ME. Supplementation Strategies to Enhance Beef Cattle Production Efficiency. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Florida; 2016. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0050442.

Council of Science Editors:

Garcia Ascolani ME. Supplementation Strategies to Enhance Beef Cattle Production Efficiency. [Masters Thesis]. University of Florida; 2016. Available from: https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0050442

.