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You searched for subject:(Supernatural explanations). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Georgiadou, Triantafyllia. Φυσικές και υπερφυσικές ερμηνείες υπαρξιακών ζητημάτων κατά τη διάρκεια της ζωής: συναισθηματικοί, γνωστικοί και κοινωνικοί παράγοντες.

Degree: 2019, University of Western Macedonia; Πανεπιστήμιο Δυτικής Μακεδονίας

The use of alternative explanations for biological phenomena –particularly the ones referring to human existence – is widespread. Focusing on the concept of death, the present doctoral thesis aims to explore natural and supernatural explanations across the life span. The present thesis consists of four successive studies. Each study aims to provide answers to different research questions concerning the use of natural and supernatural explanations of death across the life span as well as the possible relation of different explanatory frameworks with emotional, cognitive and social factors. More specifically, the 1st Study explores natural and supernatural explanations of death in children and adolescents aged 10 to 14 years (N=127), in relation to loneliness and mother – child attachment. The 2nd Study focuses on the use of natural and supernatural explanation in adults aged 25 to 65 years (N=175) in relation to religiosity, existential anxiety, depression, anxiety and stress. The 3rd Study aims to explore informant’s influence on adults’ (aged between 25 and 65 years, N=540) acceptance of natural and supernatural explanations of death. Finally, the 4th Study focuses on the natural and supernatural explanations of death in adults aged 25 and 35 years (N=86) in relation to executive functions. Research results suggest that the use of supernatural explanations is widespread among pre-adolescents, adolescents as well as adults. Regarding the adults using supernatural explanations of death, there seem to be differentiations concerning the functions that they attribute to dead agents. Moreover, supernatural explanations of death seem to co-exist with emotional factors, such as anxiety over mother abandonment, secure and anxious attachment with God, existential anxiety, depression and stress. Furthermore, the level of inhibitory control is related with the use of explanatory frameworks. Finally, the information concerning the informant’s knowledge as well as the level of religiosity exert influence on the judgements about the trustworthiness of natural and supernatural explanations. The existence and frequent use of supernatural explanations of death, despite the acquisition of the biological concept of death, suggest that the acquisition of scientific knowledge isn’t always a sufficient condition that leads to the replacement of alternative explanations with the scientific ones. On the contrary, concerning existential issues, apart from cognitive factors, emotional and social factors are, also, possibly related with the choice of explanatory framework.

H χρήση εναλλακτικών ερμηνειών για την ερμηνεία βιολογικών φαινομένων - ιδιαίτερα δε όσων αφορούν στην ίδια την ανθρώπινη ύπαρξη - είναι ιδιαίτερα διαδεδομένη. Εστιάζοντας στην έννοια του θανάτου, στόχος της παρούσας διδακτορικής διατριβής είναι η διερεύνηση των φυσικών και υπερφυσικών ερμηνευτικών μοντέλων κατά την διάρκεια της ζωής. Η παρούσα διατριβή αποτελείται από τέσσερις διαδοχικές μελέτες. Κάθε μελέτη φιλοδοξεί να απαντήσει σε διαφορετικά ερευνητικά ερωτήματα που…

Subjects/Keywords: Ερμηνευτικά μοντέλα αποκωδικοποίησης; Bιολογικό / επιστημονικό μοντέλο; Yπερφυσικές ερμηνείες; Έννοια του θανάτου; Explanatory frameworks; Biological / scientific explanatory frameworks; Supernatural explanations; Death concept

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Georgiadou, T. (2019). Φυσικές και υπερφυσικές ερμηνείες υπαρξιακών ζητημάτων κατά τη διάρκεια της ζωής: συναισθηματικοί, γνωστικοί και κοινωνικοί παράγοντες. (Thesis). University of Western Macedonia; Πανεπιστήμιο Δυτικής Μακεδονίας. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10442/hedi/45120

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Georgiadou, Triantafyllia. “Φυσικές και υπερφυσικές ερμηνείες υπαρξιακών ζητημάτων κατά τη διάρκεια της ζωής: συναισθηματικοί, γνωστικοί και κοινωνικοί παράγοντες.” 2019. Thesis, University of Western Macedonia; Πανεπιστήμιο Δυτικής Μακεδονίας. Accessed February 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10442/hedi/45120.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Georgiadou, Triantafyllia. “Φυσικές και υπερφυσικές ερμηνείες υπαρξιακών ζητημάτων κατά τη διάρκεια της ζωής: συναισθηματικοί, γνωστικοί και κοινωνικοί παράγοντες.” 2019. Web. 22 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Georgiadou T. Φυσικές και υπερφυσικές ερμηνείες υπαρξιακών ζητημάτων κατά τη διάρκεια της ζωής: συναισθηματικοί, γνωστικοί και κοινωνικοί παράγοντες. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Western Macedonia; Πανεπιστήμιο Δυτικής Μακεδονίας; 2019. [cited 2019 Feb 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10442/hedi/45120.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Georgiadou T. Φυσικές και υπερφυσικές ερμηνείες υπαρξιακών ζητημάτων κατά τη διάρκεια της ζωής: συναισθηματικοί, γνωστικοί και κοινωνικοί παράγοντες. [Thesis]. University of Western Macedonia; Πανεπιστήμιο Δυτικής Μακεδονίας; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10442/hedi/45120

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Otago

2. Jong, Jonathan. Scaring the bejesus into people: The effects of mortality salience on explicit and implicit religious belief .

Degree: 2012, University of Otago

The belief in supernatural agents is a universal feature of human social cognition. Recent cognitive theories of religion might explain the origins of supernatural concepts, but they do not adequately explain religious belief and the commonly costly devotion to deities. Many functional and motivational factors have been proposed, but the notion that religious beliefs are driven by fear of death recurs across the history of theorizing about religion. Some efforts have been made to examine these theories, but various methodological limitations (e.g., measurement, sampling) render the evidence ambiguous and inconclusive. The present research further explores the correlational and causal relationships between mortality-related concerns and religious belief and tests between two theoretical accounts of this relationship. Terror Management Theory’s worldview defense hypothesis proposes that confidence in one’s beliefs—whether religious, moral, political, or otherwise cultural—mitigates fear of death; concomitantly, thinking about death leads individuals to defend their own worldviews, regardless of their content. According to this account, increased cognitive accessibility of death-related thoughts should increase religious belief among religious individuals, and increase religious disbelief among non-religious individuals. On the other hand, recent theories in the cognitive science of religion suggest that human beings have a distinct cognitive inclination toward belief in supernatural entities, which mitigate fear of death by association with the possibility of literal immortality (e.g., afterlife scenarios, immortal souls, life-giving deities). According to this account, increased accessibility of death-related thoughts should increase religious belief for both religious and non-religious individuals, regardless of their prior worldview commitments. The aim of Study 1 was to develop a self-report measure of religious belief. The Supernatural Belief Scale (SBS)—a 10-item questionnaire about cross-culturally common supernatural concepts—was found to be a reliable and valid measure of religious belief. This new scale was then applied in Study 2, which found that the statistical relationship between trait levels of death-anxiety and religious belief was moderated by categorical religiosity. For non-religious participants, fear of death increases as religious belief increases, whereas for religious participants, it decreases as religious belief increases. Study 3 then applied the SBS in an experimental study, examining the effects of mortality salience—increased death-thought accessibility—on religious belief. Consisting with Terror Management Theory’s worldview defense hypothesis, mortality salience led to increased belief among religious participants and increased disbelief among non-religious participants. To address the possibility that Study 3’s results were confounded by strategic responding biases to which self-report measures are particularly susceptible, Study 4 employed an indirect measure of religious… Advisors/Committee Members: Halberstadt, Jamin (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: religious belief; fear of death; death anxiety; evolutionary psychology; cognitive science of religion; naturalistic explanations of religion; supernatural beliefs; philosophy of religion

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jong, J. (2012). Scaring the bejesus into people: The effects of mortality salience on explicit and implicit religious belief . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2124

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jong, Jonathan. “Scaring the bejesus into people: The effects of mortality salience on explicit and implicit religious belief .” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Otago. Accessed February 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2124.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jong, Jonathan. “Scaring the bejesus into people: The effects of mortality salience on explicit and implicit religious belief .” 2012. Web. 22 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Jong J. Scaring the bejesus into people: The effects of mortality salience on explicit and implicit religious belief . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Otago; 2012. [cited 2019 Feb 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2124.

Council of Science Editors:

Jong J. Scaring the bejesus into people: The effects of mortality salience on explicit and implicit religious belief . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Otago; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2124

.