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You searched for subject:(Sulphate penetration depth). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Toronto

1. Karkar, Ester. Developing and Evaluating Rapid Test Methods for Measuring the Sulphate Penetration Resistance of Concrete in Relation to Chloride Penetration Resistance.

Degree: 2011, University of Toronto

External sulphate attack on concrete can lead to cracking, expansion and sometimes loss of cohesiveness of hardened cement paste. Therefore, aside from using sulphate resistant cementitious binders, it is important to design concrete which can resist sulphate penetration. In this research, both ASTM C1202 and NT Build 492 electrical migration tests were modified such that sulphate rather than chloride penetration resistances were measured. Modifications included exposing concrete specimens to Na2SO4 rather than NaCl solutions and measuring the depth of sulphate penetration visually using BaCl2+KMnO4 rather than AgNO3 solution. Nine concrete mixtures of varying w/cm, slag replacement and cement types were tested in both original standard tests and modified tests to evaluate the influence of these material variables on test results and compare chloride to sulphate results. It was found that while migration coefficients and total charge passing were lower for sulphate, the influence of material variables were relatively similar.

MAST

Advisors/Committee Members: Hooton, Robert Douglas, Civil Engineering.

Subjects/Keywords: Concrete; Sulphate penetration resistance; Chloride penetration resistance; Rapid test methods; Sulphate penetration depth; 0543

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Karkar, E. (2011). Developing and Evaluating Rapid Test Methods for Measuring the Sulphate Penetration Resistance of Concrete in Relation to Chloride Penetration Resistance. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31271

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Karkar, Ester. “Developing and Evaluating Rapid Test Methods for Measuring the Sulphate Penetration Resistance of Concrete in Relation to Chloride Penetration Resistance.” 2011. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed June 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31271.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Karkar, Ester. “Developing and Evaluating Rapid Test Methods for Measuring the Sulphate Penetration Resistance of Concrete in Relation to Chloride Penetration Resistance.” 2011. Web. 16 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Karkar E. Developing and Evaluating Rapid Test Methods for Measuring the Sulphate Penetration Resistance of Concrete in Relation to Chloride Penetration Resistance. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2011. [cited 2019 Jun 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31271.

Council of Science Editors:

Karkar E. Developing and Evaluating Rapid Test Methods for Measuring the Sulphate Penetration Resistance of Concrete in Relation to Chloride Penetration Resistance. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31271


University of Newcastle

2. Pham, Van Ngoc. Durability of soil-cement columns in coastal areas.

Degree: MPhil, 2016, University of Newcastle

Masters Research - Master of Philosophy (MPhil)

Global warming and sea level rise have become major concerns of the modern world with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reporting that sea levels may rise by 52-98 cm in the 21st century. At the upper end of predicted sea level rise, 50% of the world’s population will be affected, with 33% of coastal land lost. As the majority of buildings and transport infrastructure are concentrated in these coastal areas, it is very important to understand of the longevity of these structures in the face of sea level rise. Soil-cement columns are a geotechnical solution used for ground improvement in coastal areas. However, after long periods of exposure, the strength of these columns may decrease to below their designed safe bearing capacity ultimately resulting in failure. In this study, needle penetration resistance tests, uniaxial compression tests, thermogravimetric analysis, chemical and image analyses were applied to determine the extent of deterioration in scaled soil-cement columns exposed to synthetic seawater. The effects of high sulphate concentrations (100%, 200%, 500% and 1000% that of seawater) on the durability of soil-cement samples were also studied. The experimental results show that the effects of seawater (sulphate) are significant on the outer surface strength development. For samples exposed to seawater, inhibition of the portlandite and formation of gypsum and ettringite are the main reasons leading to the destruction of soil-cement samples. Moreover, the deterioration is strong at the surface and develops inward with time. An analytical model has been developed and calibrated using the experimental data to predict the deterioration depths and total strength change of the soil-cement columns as a function of time and sulphate concentration. Results show that for the 0.5 m diameter column exposed to 200% SW, the strength will fall below the minimum design strength after 75 years. For higher sulphate environments (500% and 1000% that of seawater), the same column would never reach the minimum design strength requirement. Consequently, this has significant implications to stabilising soils in high sulphate environments such as those containing pyrite which makes up approximate 95,000 km² of the Australian coastline.

Advisors/Committee Members: University of Newcastle. Faculty of Engineering & Built Environment, School of Engineering.

Subjects/Keywords: soil-cement column; deterioration; needle penetration test; sulphate concentrations; deterioration depth

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pham, V. N. (2016). Durability of soil-cement columns in coastal areas. (Masters Thesis). University of Newcastle. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1959.13/1321915

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pham, Van Ngoc. “Durability of soil-cement columns in coastal areas.” 2016. Masters Thesis, University of Newcastle. Accessed June 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1959.13/1321915.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pham, Van Ngoc. “Durability of soil-cement columns in coastal areas.” 2016. Web. 16 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Pham VN. Durability of soil-cement columns in coastal areas. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Newcastle; 2016. [cited 2019 Jun 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.13/1321915.

Council of Science Editors:

Pham VN. Durability of soil-cement columns in coastal areas. [Masters Thesis]. University of Newcastle; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.13/1321915

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