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You searched for subject:(Substance use initiation). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Southern California

1. Jackson, Nicholas J. Antecedents of marijuana initiation.

Degree: MA, Psychology, 2014, University of Southern California

Marijuana use among adolescents has been increasing and is associated with loss in cognitive abilities, risky behavior, and later substance abuse and dependence. Specifically, early initiation is associated with long-term negative outcomes. Data from The University of Southern California (USC) Risk Factors for Antisocial Behavior (RFAB) twin study were used to examine the psychosocial antecedents of marijuana initiation in adolescence. Participants were assessed in Wave 1 (ages 9-10) for risk and resiliency factors prior to ever having used marijuana. Marijuana use was assessed every 2-3 years, with the participants currently 19-20 years old (Wave 5-ongoing). The sample was randomly split such that one twin was assigned to an exploratory dataset and the co-twin to a testing (or confirmation) dataset. The exploratory dataset was used for model building and the testing dataset was used to determine the robustness or accuracy of the model. Wave 1 predictors were used in multinomial logistic regression models to predict initiation age groups. Gradient Boosted Modeling was used to identify influential predictors of ever having used marijuana. Predictors of initiation were related to friendships and bully victimization, sociodemographics, parental stress, and the parent-child relationship. Advisors/Committee Members: Baker, Laura A. (Committee Chair), McArdle, John J. (Committee Member), Monterosso, John R. (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: marijuana initiation; twin study; substance use; adolescence; statistical learning; machine learning; gradient boosting

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jackson, N. J. (2014). Antecedents of marijuana initiation. (Masters Thesis). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/488477/rec/838

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jackson, Nicholas J. “Antecedents of marijuana initiation.” 2014. Masters Thesis, University of Southern California. Accessed September 18, 2019. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/488477/rec/838.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jackson, Nicholas J. “Antecedents of marijuana initiation.” 2014. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Jackson NJ. Antecedents of marijuana initiation. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Southern California; 2014. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/488477/rec/838.

Council of Science Editors:

Jackson NJ. Antecedents of marijuana initiation. [Masters Thesis]. University of Southern California; 2014. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/488477/rec/838


Florida International University

2. Ladis, Barry Allen. Longitudinal Effects of Peer, School, and Parenting Contexts on Substance Use Initiation in Middle School Adolescence.

Degree: PhD, Social Welfare, 2018, Florida International University

Substance use initiation (SUI) among adolescents is a critical public health concern. Research indicates SUI in middle adolescence increases the risk of substance use in adulthood and later dependence, which can result in deleterious consequences for youth, family relationships, and community (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, [SAMSHA], 2014). This study investigated the role of involvement with deviant peers, school connectedness, and parenting quality on SUI (e.g., alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana) in middle adolescence using secondary data from a 5-year longitudinal study (N = 387). First, exploratory factor analyses and confirmatory factor analyses with a separate independent sample were conducted to develop a measure of parenting quality. Second, moderated mediation was tested using PROCESS (Hayes, 2013) with each parenting quality factor as a moderator of two mediation pathways (involvement with deviant peers and school connectedness) on three SUI outcomes. Results from the exploratory factor and confirmatory factor analyses were consistent and provided evidence for a three-factor solution for parenting quality: Parental Knowledge and Affective Relationships, Parental Control, and Parental Communication and Involvement. Results from the moderated mediation analyses did not support parenting quality factors as moderators for either mediation model. Involvement with deviant peers (Wave 3) mediated the relation between school connectedness (Wave 2) and each of the three substances (Wave 5) across all levels of parenting quality (e.g., bias-corrected bootstrap confidence intervals = -.50 – -.18 at low, -.47 – -.19 at average, and -.50 – -.16 at high levels of Parental Knowledge and Affective Relationships for alcohol use initiation). More specifically, low school connectedness predicted higher involvement with deviant peers, which, in turn, predicted a higher likelihood of SUI. School connectedness was not a significant mediator in the relationship between involvement with deviant peers and SUI. Although parenting quality factors did not moderate either of the mediation pathways, development of a comprehensive and psychometrically valid measure may aid in identifying specific parenting problem areas necessary for preventive intervention planning. Additionally, supporting adolescents who lack strong connections within the school may help prevent involvement with deviant peers and SUI. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Barbara Thomlison, Dr. Nicole M. Fava, Dr. Hui Huang, Dr. Elisa M. Trucco.

Subjects/Keywords: Substance use initiation; peers; schools; parents; and adolescents; Child Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Social Work

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ladis, B. A. (2018). Longitudinal Effects of Peer, School, and Parenting Contexts on Substance Use Initiation in Middle School Adolescence. (Doctoral Dissertation). Florida International University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3696 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC006575 ; FIDC006575

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ladis, Barry Allen. “Longitudinal Effects of Peer, School, and Parenting Contexts on Substance Use Initiation in Middle School Adolescence.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Florida International University. Accessed September 18, 2019. https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3696 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC006575 ; FIDC006575.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ladis, Barry Allen. “Longitudinal Effects of Peer, School, and Parenting Contexts on Substance Use Initiation in Middle School Adolescence.” 2018. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Ladis BA. Longitudinal Effects of Peer, School, and Parenting Contexts on Substance Use Initiation in Middle School Adolescence. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Florida International University; 2018. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3696 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC006575 ; FIDC006575.

Council of Science Editors:

Ladis BA. Longitudinal Effects of Peer, School, and Parenting Contexts on Substance Use Initiation in Middle School Adolescence. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Florida International University; 2018. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3696 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC006575 ; FIDC006575

3. Sloas, Lincoln. Examining the Relationship between Treatment Readiness and Substance Use Treatment Initiation and Engagement .

Degree: 2015, George Mason University

With nearly 70 percent of the criminal justice population experiencing substance use related issues, treatment is a sound strategy to combat these issues (Chandler, Fletcher, & Volkow, 2009). Despite the promising nature of substance use treatment, roughly 40 percent of individuals terminate treatment within six months of initiating (Joe, Simpson, Dansereau, & Rowan-Szal, 2014). To achieve gains in efforts to use treatment as a tool to address substance abuse needs, it is important to understand the factors that influence positive or negative treatment outcomes. One under researched area is treatment readiness, which is defined as, “the presence of characteristics (states or dispositions) within either the client or the therapeutic situation, which are likely to promote engagement in therapy and which, thereby, are likely to enhance therapeutic change” (Ward, Day, Howells, & Birgden, 2004, p. 650). It is theorized to be important to both initiation and engagement in substance use treatment services, without which it is nearly impossible to complete treatment. Initiation and engagement are referred to as treatment process measures and are important because they are actionable and they help to identify ways to improve substance use services offered to individuals (Horgan & Garnick, 2005). This dissertation examines the impact of treatment readiness on initiation and engagement in substance use treatment programs. Using the transtheoretical model (TTM) of change, this research explores the following general hypotheses: 1) Treatment readiness will significantly predict substance use treatment initiation; 2) Treatment readiness will significantly predict substance use treatment engagement; 3) Treatment readiness will increase the likelihood of initiating substance use treatment, controlling for other relevant factors; and 4) Treatment readiness will increase the likelihood of engaging in substance use treatment, controlling for the other factors. Data for these analyses are derived from the 2012 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (SAMHSA/CSAT) data set (n = 5,443). Stepwise binary logistic regression models were created to identify the factors that affect both treatment initiation and engagement. The findings of this dissertation provide support for the overall effect of treatment readiness on substance use treatment initiation but not engagement. Individuals having support from family and friends are more likely to initiate substance use treatment. Engagement is more likely to occur for those individuals who experience more substance use and have more physical health problems. Treatment readiness is also affected by demographics (e.g., race, gender, age). Treatment readiness significantly predicts initiating but does not predict engaging in substance use treatment. From a policy perspective, interventions should be used to enhance individuals’ levels of treatment readiness before being referred to treatment services thus increasing their likelihood of… Advisors/Committee Members: Taxman, Faye S (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Criminology; Social research; Sociology; Engagement; Initiation; Policy implications; Substance use; Transtheoretical model; Treatment readiness

…76 Table 12. Binary Logistic Regression Predicting Substance Use Treatment Initiation… …important to both initiation and engagement in substance use treatment services, without which it… …Treatment readiness will significantly predict substance use treatment initiation; 2)… …support for the overall effect of treatment readiness on substance use treatment initiation but… …people do or do not initiate, and how initiation affects engagement in substance use treatment… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sloas, L. (2015). Examining the Relationship between Treatment Readiness and Substance Use Treatment Initiation and Engagement . (Thesis). George Mason University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1920/9838

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sloas, Lincoln. “Examining the Relationship between Treatment Readiness and Substance Use Treatment Initiation and Engagement .” 2015. Thesis, George Mason University. Accessed September 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1920/9838.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sloas, Lincoln. “Examining the Relationship between Treatment Readiness and Substance Use Treatment Initiation and Engagement .” 2015. Web. 18 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Sloas L. Examining the Relationship between Treatment Readiness and Substance Use Treatment Initiation and Engagement . [Internet] [Thesis]. George Mason University; 2015. [cited 2019 Sep 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1920/9838.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Sloas L. Examining the Relationship between Treatment Readiness and Substance Use Treatment Initiation and Engagement . [Thesis]. George Mason University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1920/9838

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.