Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(Sub concussive impacts). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Toronto

1. Good, Tyler J. Modeling the Effect of Repeated Sub-concussive Impacts in Soccer Players Using The Virtual Brain.

Degree: 2015, University of Toronto

Repeated sub-concussive impacts (blows transmitting force to head, but not causing overt concussion symptoms) have been linked to negative outcomes later in life, such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy. However, the effects of sub-concussive impacts in the short-term are only beginning to be explored. The present study analyzed post-season structural (T1, DTI), and functional (fMRI) data collected from a group of university-aged soccer players and non-collision sport controls. Whole-brain functional connectivity was higher in soccer players relative to controls, while structural connectivity did not differ between groups. Additionally, The Virtual Brain (TVB), a whole-brain simulator of functional brain dynamics, was validated in this population by producing functional connectivity matrices that correlated with empirical data. Together, results indicated that repeated sub-concussive impacts may affect functional connectivity in the short-term, and that TVB could be a valuable tool in future studies of this population.

M.A.

Advisors/Committee Members: McIntosh, Anthony R, Psychology.

Subjects/Keywords: brain connectivity; brain networks; computational modeling; Repetitive sub-concussive impacts; The Virtual Brain; whole-brain model; 0317

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Good, T. J. (2015). Modeling the Effect of Repeated Sub-concussive Impacts in Soccer Players Using The Virtual Brain. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/70396

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Good, Tyler J. “Modeling the Effect of Repeated Sub-concussive Impacts in Soccer Players Using The Virtual Brain.” 2015. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/70396.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Good, Tyler J. “Modeling the Effect of Repeated Sub-concussive Impacts in Soccer Players Using The Virtual Brain.” 2015. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Good TJ. Modeling the Effect of Repeated Sub-concussive Impacts in Soccer Players Using The Virtual Brain. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2015. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/70396.

Council of Science Editors:

Good TJ. Modeling the Effect of Repeated Sub-concussive Impacts in Soccer Players Using The Virtual Brain. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/70396

2. Grimes, Katelyn E. The Effect of Repetitive Head Impacts on Postural Control Over the Course of a Single Season.

Degree: MSin Kinesiology (M.S.), Department of Health and Kinesiology, 2017, Georgia Southern University

INTRODUCTION: Recently neurocognitive dysfunction has been linked to poor postural control in concussed athletes. While the detrimental effect of repetitive head impacts on cognitive function have been shown to mirror the effects of concussive injury, very little research has investigated the physical consequences of repetitive head impacts. PURPOSE: To observe the effects of RHI on postural control, both static and dynamic, in NCAA Division I athletes over the course of a single season. METHODS: 9 NCAA Division I football athletes (CON) were recruited from a single university as the experimental group, as well as 9 NCAA Division I baseball players (NON) from the same university to serve as non-contact control group. Subjects’ postural control, measured via a force platform, was tested before and after their fall competitive season using a static postural control assessment and dynamic postural control assessment. The static postural control assessment consisted of eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) quiet standing, while the dynamic postural control assessment consisted of the Wii Fit Soccer Heading Game (WiiSoccer), a sport relevant goal-oriented task. Center of pressure data was used to observed peak excursion velocity (PEV) in the medial-lateral (ML) and anterior-posterior (AP) direction, 95% confidence ellipse (CE), and sample entropy (SampEn) in the ML and AP direction. Repetitive head impacts were quantified in the CON group using the Head Impact Telemetry (HIT) System, which is a six-single axis accelerometer helmet unit that was used to record peak linear accelerations. The HIT System was used to quantify the cumulative impact burden (CIB) and average impact magnitude (AIM) among the CON group. RESULTS: Subjects in the CON group experienced a CIB of 1,234.2 g ± 1,0098 g and AIM of 30.7 g ± 6.8 g over the course of 52 practice sessions and 19 game/scrimmage sessions. Repeated measures ANOVA’s revealed a significant difference (p=0.003) in EO SampEn ML between pre (CON: 0.544, NON: 0.548) and post-season testing (CON: 0.433, NON: 0.515). There was also a significant difference (p< 0.001) between pre (CON: 0.657, NON: 0.565) and post-season (CON: 0.548, NON: 0.549). Finally, there was a significant effect (p=0.003) of time by groups in SampEn AP; the CON group had a significantly greater decline between pre (0.657) and post-season (0.548) compared to NON group (0.565 vs. 0.544 respectively). No significant difference was found in the EC or WiiSoccer condition. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that athletic participation does influence static postural control. Nonlinear force plate variables may be the only metrics capable to detecting subtle changes that occur throughout the season. Finally, these results suggest that there was a significant difference between CON and NON during EO condition. This may indicate a deficiency in appropriate integration of visual information, and inability of effective communication between postural control systems during simple tasks in the CON group due to increased exposure… Advisors/Committee Members: Tamerah Hunt, Barry Munkasy.

Subjects/Keywords: Postural control; repetitive head impacts; Sub-concussive impacts; balance; Biomechanics; Motor Control; Sports Sciences; Jack N. Averitt College of Graduate Studies, Electronic Theses & Dissertations, ETDs, Student Research

…6 CHAPTER 1.2 REPETITIVE HEAD IMPACTS… …32 PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND NEUROPHYSIOLOGY OF CONCUSSIVE INJURIES ....... 34 ASSESSMENTS OF… …MEASURING IMPACTS… …40 5 REPETITIVE HEAD IMPACTS AND CLINICAL OUTCOMES… …contact nature of the sport.8 CHAPTER 1.2 REPETITIVE HEAD IMPACTS Repetitive head impacts (… 

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Grimes, K. E. (2017). The Effect of Repetitive Head Impacts on Postural Control Over the Course of a Single Season. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Southern University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/1563

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Grimes, Katelyn E. “The Effect of Repetitive Head Impacts on Postural Control Over the Course of a Single Season.” 2017. Masters Thesis, Georgia Southern University. Accessed January 16, 2021. https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/1563.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Grimes, Katelyn E. “The Effect of Repetitive Head Impacts on Postural Control Over the Course of a Single Season.” 2017. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Grimes KE. The Effect of Repetitive Head Impacts on Postural Control Over the Course of a Single Season. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Southern University; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/1563.

Council of Science Editors:

Grimes KE. The Effect of Repetitive Head Impacts on Postural Control Over the Course of a Single Season. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Southern University; 2017. Available from: https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/1563


Queens University

3. Champagne, Allen. Characterizing the Effects of Sub-Concussive Head Impacts on Brain Biomarkers: a Multi-Modal Approach Toward Developing Safer Practices on the Football Field .

Degree: Neuroscience Studies, Queens University

Growing literature has raised concerns that repeated sub-concussive impacts to the head may induce changes in both structural and functional brain biomarkers. Despite these findings however, evidence from neuroimaging using the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast has limited our understanding for the effects of repetitive head impacts on physiological parameters such as cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2). In this project, we combined novel calibrated magnetic resonance imaging methods with helmet accelerometers to gather insight about the effects of sub-concussive collisions on brain hemodynamics and explore the relationship between head impacts and changes in brain biomarkers. Dual-echo BOLD and arterial spin labelling (ASL) contrasts modulated via precise gas breathing manipulations (i.e., hypercapnia and hyperoxia) were used to study changes in the brain of collegiate football players, while accounting for time-varying fluctuations in cerebrovascular physiology. Increases in default-mode network functional connectivity, as well as changes in resting CBF and CMRO2, were all documented following exposure to head impacts, suggesting that brain physiological parameters may be sensitive to repeated mechanical loading from sub-concussive events during the season. Using these findings as a basis for actions toward reducing head impacts in football, we leveraged TEDx Montréal as a social platform to introduce the NeuroProtection Project - a novel approach designed to re-focus coaching practices toward improving how athletes are thought to engage in contact on the football field. Finally, the effectiveness of the NeuroProtection project was tested in high- school football players using a combination of video analyses, helmet accelerometers and customized training paradigms. Significant improvements in blocking and tackling techniques were observed following introduction of the data-informed intervention, as well as a ~30% decrease in the frequency of head impacts sustained during practice. These findings suggest that targeted behavioral interventions may be used to improve coaching practices and promote safer play. Altogether, it is hoped that these findings will motivate the integration of multi-modal imaging designs to deepen our knowledge for the effects of sub-concussive impacts, while inspiring the expansion of community-based initiatives like the NeuroProtection project to prioritize safety in contact sports.

Subjects/Keywords: dual-calibrated magnetic resonance imaging ; cerebrovascular physiology ; cerebral metabolism ; functional connectivity ; helmet accelerometers ; sub-concussive impacts ; cerebral blood flow ; TEDx ; behavioural intervention ; sport-injury prevention ; sport safety ; football ; knowledge translation

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Champagne, A. (n.d.). Characterizing the Effects of Sub-Concussive Head Impacts on Brain Biomarkers: a Multi-Modal Approach Toward Developing Safer Practices on the Football Field . (Thesis). Queens University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1974/26361

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Champagne, Allen. “Characterizing the Effects of Sub-Concussive Head Impacts on Brain Biomarkers: a Multi-Modal Approach Toward Developing Safer Practices on the Football Field .” Thesis, Queens University. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1974/26361.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Champagne, Allen. “Characterizing the Effects of Sub-Concussive Head Impacts on Brain Biomarkers: a Multi-Modal Approach Toward Developing Safer Practices on the Football Field .” Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Champagne A. Characterizing the Effects of Sub-Concussive Head Impacts on Brain Biomarkers: a Multi-Modal Approach Toward Developing Safer Practices on the Football Field . [Internet] [Thesis]. Queens University; [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1974/26361.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Champagne A. Characterizing the Effects of Sub-Concussive Head Impacts on Brain Biomarkers: a Multi-Modal Approach Toward Developing Safer Practices on the Football Field . [Thesis]. Queens University; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1974/26361

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

.