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You searched for subject:(Sub concussion). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Penn State University

1. Rosenthal, Scott L. Professional Football Career Length And Position: Potential Risk Factors For Concussive And Subconcussive Exposure Outcomes.

Degree: 2014, Penn State University

Football is a high frequency and magnitude contact sport. Contact sports carry a higher rate of impacts to the head which are inherently associated with an increased risk of developing concussive injuries. Growing evidence indicates that subconcussive and concussive injuries can result in physiological changes which may lead to the development of cognitive, behavioral, and physical deficits. There is also evidence linking subconcussive and concussive injuries to neurodegenerative diseases like Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, Alzheimer’s Disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. Over the course of an athlete's career, concussive and subconcussive damage may accumulate and can result in permanent and devastating long-term dysfunction. Certain positions experience different types and frequencies of impacts, therefore, concussive and subconcussive-induced deficits may vary by position. This study compared retired NFL players(n=24), similarly aged non-contact controls(n=15) and position matched collegiate players(n=24) using the VR HeadRehab 3 system in order to identify any potential long-term deficits. Players were tested on measures of balance, reaction time and spatial memory. Further analysis sought to identify any relationships or risk factors for the onset of these deficits. NFL players performed significantly worse than both control groups on all VR measures. This poorer performance was associated with player career length and position. Career length was significantly associated with longer reaction time. Players in positions that were more likely to receive concussive-type(less frequent but higher magnitude) impacts had poorer spatial memory, while players in positions that experience greater subconcussive(more frequent but lower magnitude) impacts were more likely to have poorer balance. Limited evidence suggests poorer VR performance at the collegiate level. Advisors/Committee Members: Semyon Slobounov, Thesis Advisor/Co-Advisor, William Ray, Thesis Advisor/Co-Advisor, Karl Maxim Newell, Thesis Advisor/Co-Advisor.

Subjects/Keywords: concussion; subconcussion; sub-concussion; concussive; mtbi; NFL; football; deficit; impairment; position; college; brain injury

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APA (6th Edition):

Rosenthal, S. L. (2014). Professional Football Career Length And Position: Potential Risk Factors For Concussive And Subconcussive Exposure Outcomes. (Thesis). Penn State University. Retrieved from https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/21135

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rosenthal, Scott L. “Professional Football Career Length And Position: Potential Risk Factors For Concussive And Subconcussive Exposure Outcomes.” 2014. Thesis, Penn State University. Accessed November 25, 2020. https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/21135.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rosenthal, Scott L. “Professional Football Career Length And Position: Potential Risk Factors For Concussive And Subconcussive Exposure Outcomes.” 2014. Web. 25 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Rosenthal SL. Professional Football Career Length And Position: Potential Risk Factors For Concussive And Subconcussive Exposure Outcomes. [Internet] [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2014. [cited 2020 Nov 25]. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/21135.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Rosenthal SL. Professional Football Career Length And Position: Potential Risk Factors For Concussive And Subconcussive Exposure Outcomes. [Thesis]. Penn State University; 2014. Available from: https://submit-etda.libraries.psu.edu/catalog/21135

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Delaware

2. Caccese, Jaclyn B. Head acceleration across youth, high school, and collegiate soccer players.

Degree: PhD, 2016, University of Delaware

Soccer is the most popular sport worldwide with over 265 million active players. Soccer is unique in that you can use your head to advance the ball and purposeful heading is an integral part of the game. However, some have suggested that repeated heading of the soccer ball is associated with neurological deficits, though others have claimed that deficits are related to multiple head injuries. Still others have observed no neurological deficits. Ultimately, these studies are limited in that they often examine small, homogenous populations. With over 3 million youth soccer players and nearly 1 million high school soccer players competing across the United States each year, more research is needed to determine the risk associated with repeated purposeful heading, particularly among youth and high school athletes. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare head acceleration during purposeful soccer heading across age and gender, determine what factors predict higher head acceleration values, and investigate acute changes in vestibular/ocular function and postural control with purposeful soccer heading. At the collegiate and high school levels, female soccer players exhibited higher head accelerations than their male counterparts, suggesting that if female soccer players experience a similar number of headers as their male counterparts, females may be exposed to greater cumulative head accelerations from repeated heading of a soccer ball over a career of soccer. Greater neck girth, head-neck segment mass, and neck strength predicted lower peak linear and rotational acceleration and may have contributed to the observed gender differences. On average, soccer players presented with higher sway velocity post-heading compared to control participants, but no other group deficits in postural control or vestibular/ocular function were observed. Advisors/Committee Members: Kaminski, Thomas W..

Subjects/Keywords: Biological sciences; Concussion; Heading; Neck strength; Postural control; Repetitive head impacts; Soccer; Sub-concussion

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Caccese, J. B. (2016). Head acceleration across youth, high school, and collegiate soccer players. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Delaware. Retrieved from http://udspace.udel.edu/handle/19716/23614

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Caccese, Jaclyn B. “Head acceleration across youth, high school, and collegiate soccer players.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Delaware. Accessed November 25, 2020. http://udspace.udel.edu/handle/19716/23614.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Caccese, Jaclyn B. “Head acceleration across youth, high school, and collegiate soccer players.” 2016. Web. 25 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Caccese JB. Head acceleration across youth, high school, and collegiate soccer players. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Delaware; 2016. [cited 2020 Nov 25]. Available from: http://udspace.udel.edu/handle/19716/23614.

Council of Science Editors:

Caccese JB. Head acceleration across youth, high school, and collegiate soccer players. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Delaware; 2016. Available from: http://udspace.udel.edu/handle/19716/23614

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