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You searched for subject:(Student multitasking). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Antioch University

1. Rogers, Elizabeth A. Computer Multitasking in the Classroom: Training to Attend or Wander?.

Degree: Psy. D., Antioch New England: Clinical Psychology, 2019, Antioch University

This study aimed to examine the phenomenon of Psy.D. students’ multitasking on the computer while in the classroom. Using an online survey of 45 questions, the study invited Psy.D. students from across the US to answer questions pertaining to their non-class-related use of computers in the classroom, including an exploration of their relationship with computers and the internet, feelings and judgments regarding multitasking in the classroom, and opinions on the behavior and its potential impact on their profession. A total of 166 people visited the survey with 145 respondents who answered it to completion. Of the 145 participants, 86% (125) were female, 10% (14) were male, and 3.5% (5) were non-binary. The mean age was 28.5, with ages ranging from 22 to 52 and over. Approximately 85% (124) of the respondents acknowledged multitasking on their computers or devices while in class. A significant negative relationship was found between whether or not students viewed this topic as a problem and how much time they spent multitasking in class. A significant positive relationship was found between the students’ age and their level of negative judgment of others who multitask. The overall amount of neutrality and positivity towards multitasking among students was greater than expected, which illuminated this topic as being much more complex than originally conceived. This raised further questions about the current academic context within which students are multitasking, with considerations for finding ways to adapt teaching methods that can respond to ongoing neurological shifts in a new generation of students. Advisors/Committee Members: Peterson, Roger (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Clinical Psychology; computer multitasking; student distraction; student attention; student inattentiveness; therapist attention; Internet addiction

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rogers, E. A. (2019). Computer Multitasking in the Classroom: Training to Attend or Wander?. (Doctoral Dissertation). Antioch University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=antioch1525185265456238

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rogers, Elizabeth A. “Computer Multitasking in the Classroom: Training to Attend or Wander?.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, Antioch University. Accessed October 20, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=antioch1525185265456238.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rogers, Elizabeth A. “Computer Multitasking in the Classroom: Training to Attend or Wander?.” 2019. Web. 20 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Rogers EA. Computer Multitasking in the Classroom: Training to Attend or Wander?. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Antioch University; 2019. [cited 2019 Oct 20]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=antioch1525185265456238.

Council of Science Editors:

Rogers EA. Computer Multitasking in the Classroom: Training to Attend or Wander?. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Antioch University; 2019. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=antioch1525185265456238


University of Edinburgh

2. Tan, Jiun Yi. The Effects of Interruption Task Complexity and Interruptions on Student Multitasking.

Degree: 2013, University of Edinburgh

Students commonly multitask while studying. The ubiquitous use of laptops and computers has facilitated this phenomenon and even changed the nature of multitasking in studying environments. Interruptions have an undeniable presence in these everyday studying environments and there are growing concerns about their potential to disrupt both performance and the learning process. Since interruptions are unavoidable, it is useful to identify the features that make some interruptions more disruptive than others. This study investigates how interruption task complexity affects student multitasking, using a novel computer-based multitasking paradigm comprising four subtasks (article comprehension, email-typing, video dictation, figure-copying). The number of mental operators required for an interruption task will be used to define interruption complexity. 36 undergraduates from the University of Edinburgh were randomly assigned to three different interruption groups. The control group was not interrupted, the easy interruption group was given an easy picture-naming task, and the difficult interruption was given a difficult picture-naming, defining and decision-making task. Results of a Kruskal-Wallis test revealed no differences in overall multitasking performance between the groups. However, a three-way repeated measures ANOVA demonstrated that there were significant declines in post-interruption compared to pre- interruption performance. Furthermore, this effect was greater for the group that received difficult, as opposed to easy interruptions, supporting the hypothesis that complex interruptions are more disruptive than simple interruptions. Taken together, results from this study suggest that the disruptive impact of interruptions is very brief and that students are able to compensate for interruptions during multitasking. Advisors/Committee Members: Logie, Robert.

Subjects/Keywords: Interruption complexity; Interruptions; Student multitasking

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Tan, J. Y. (2013). The Effects of Interruption Task Complexity and Interruptions on Student Multitasking. (Thesis). University of Edinburgh. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1842/8679

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tan, Jiun Yi. “The Effects of Interruption Task Complexity and Interruptions on Student Multitasking.” 2013. Thesis, University of Edinburgh. Accessed October 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1842/8679.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tan, Jiun Yi. “The Effects of Interruption Task Complexity and Interruptions on Student Multitasking.” 2013. Web. 20 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Tan JY. The Effects of Interruption Task Complexity and Interruptions on Student Multitasking. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Edinburgh; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/8679.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Tan JY. The Effects of Interruption Task Complexity and Interruptions on Student Multitasking. [Thesis]. University of Edinburgh; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/8679

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of North Texas

3. Kurtenbach, John. Adolescent Task Management: Multitasking and Social Media in the Student Search Process.

Degree: 2013, University of North Texas

This study examines adolescent students at an American international school and observes student use of social networking programs as well as physical actions in the search process. The study specifically observed multitasking behavior and organizational skills among students, as well as linkages made through social networking sites. Student observations, student interviews, analysis of Facebook entries, and a survey on multitasking yielded rich data. Students appear to be far more organized than previously suggested in the literature, and in this study, the organization proved to be largely self-taught. Students used their social networks to build a kind of group expertise that compensated for their youthful naivety. Students exhibited self-control within the search to the degree that they could focus on what they wanted to find, and they used heuristics—mental shortcuts—to achieve what they needed. Searches also suggest creativity in that students were flexible in their search methods and used a number of tools to gather information. Students could balance the needs of the academic or imposed search with their own online lives, meaning that they made compensations for social media and media multitasking when it was deemed necessary. Advisors/Committee Members: Schultz-Jones, Barbara, Smith, Daniella, Lin, Lin.

Subjects/Keywords: Multitasking; task management; information search behavior; international student

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kurtenbach, J. (2013). Adolescent Task Management: Multitasking and Social Media in the Student Search Process. (Thesis). University of North Texas. Retrieved from https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc500064/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kurtenbach, John. “Adolescent Task Management: Multitasking and Social Media in the Student Search Process.” 2013. Thesis, University of North Texas. Accessed October 20, 2019. https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc500064/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kurtenbach, John. “Adolescent Task Management: Multitasking and Social Media in the Student Search Process.” 2013. Web. 20 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Kurtenbach J. Adolescent Task Management: Multitasking and Social Media in the Student Search Process. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 20]. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc500064/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kurtenbach J. Adolescent Task Management: Multitasking and Social Media in the Student Search Process. [Thesis]. University of North Texas; 2013. Available from: https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc500064/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.