Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(Student Developmen). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Eastern Michigan University

1. Porter, Jeff I. Between the classroom and the field: An examination of the experiences of black male football student-athletes.

Degree: PhD, Leadership and Counseling, 2017, Eastern Michigan University

This study is concerned with the fact that numerous Black student-athletes that play football at Division 1 predominantly White institutions (PWIs) are graduating at the lowest rates of all student and student-athlete groups on college campuses nationwide. An intercollegiate athletics system acts as the commercial arm of the university and is designed to ensure the sustainability and viability of football by creating contradictory athletic and academic pressures that the student-athletes must navigate. Despite the intentional obstacles that Black student athletes encounter, there are many that do graduate from their institution and transition into a professional career. Therefore, the guiding research question was: How did Black male football student-athletes manage to graduate while being part of a Division 1 team at a research-intensive institution? Purposeful sampling was used to select participants who met the criteria defined by the researcher. This study utilized a qualitative case study method to examine the experiences of the selected participants. Primary data were collected through interviews from five Black football players and seven current and former university faculty and staff members. Secondary data were collected from participant questionnaires and cross-referenced with media guides and player profiles. The study revealed three central findings. First, the data disproved the common notion that Black football student-athletes are from inner city, poor socioeconomic backgrounds and attended failing high schools that did not adequately prepare them for college. Second, the participants in this study navigated contradictory athletic and academic pressures when they utilized their strong social support network of people who provided advice, guidance, and a safe space to process feelings. The function of the support was to strengthen their motivation to graduate. Last, the organizational system which these student-athletes had to navigate, influenced all facets of their lives and dictated the degree programs they pursued. The student-athletes that managed to graduate from the institution did so from a degree program that was accommodating to their football related schedules. Implications and suggestions from the author for future research are also discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Raul Leon, Ph.D., Chair, James Barott, Ph.D., Ronald Flowers, Ed.D..

Subjects/Keywords: Achievement; Black Student-Athletes; Higher Education; Intercollegiate Athletics; Organizational Theory; Student Developmen; Educational Leadership

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Porter, J. I. (2017). Between the classroom and the field: An examination of the experiences of black male football student-athletes. (Doctoral Dissertation). Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved from http://commons.emich.edu/theses/745

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Porter, Jeff I. “Between the classroom and the field: An examination of the experiences of black male football student-athletes.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Eastern Michigan University. Accessed July 21, 2019. http://commons.emich.edu/theses/745.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Porter, Jeff I. “Between the classroom and the field: An examination of the experiences of black male football student-athletes.” 2017. Web. 21 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Porter JI. Between the classroom and the field: An examination of the experiences of black male football student-athletes. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Eastern Michigan University; 2017. [cited 2019 Jul 21]. Available from: http://commons.emich.edu/theses/745.

Council of Science Editors:

Porter JI. Between the classroom and the field: An examination of the experiences of black male football student-athletes. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Eastern Michigan University; 2017. Available from: http://commons.emich.edu/theses/745


Virginia Tech

2. Sprenger, Kurt William. Perceived Effectiveness of Faculty Development Programs for Full-Time Occupational-Technical Faculty in Virginia Community Colleges.

Degree: PhD, Vocational and Technical Education, 1999, Virginia Tech

The purpose of this study was to identify faculty perceptions of the personal and student benefits deriving from participation in faculty development activities. Faced with the challenge of keeping up-to-date with technology in order to keep their students up-to-date, faculty participate in many different activities. The perceived effectiveness of faculty development activities varies depending on the knowledge and interest of each faculty member. This study was descriptive, using a two-part survey to collect both quantitative and qualitative data. First, a mail survey was used to collect data on the perceptions of faculty members regarding 12 professional development activities. The survey was sent out to 407 faculty in Business Technology and Engineering and Industrial Technology at the 23 colleges in the Virginia Community College System. Second, selected participants were contacted for a follow-up phone interview which elucidated some of the information from the mail survey. The surveys were designed based upon a review of the literature and through interviews with professionals. The survey was pilot tested on community college faculty. Major findings from the study included the following: <ol> The three most participated in activities were training in computer skills, professional conferences, and college-sponsored presentations and workshops. Professional conferences and college-sponsored presentations and workshops were the highest rated in terms of participation, but rated the lowest in terms of personal and student benefit. Females, on average, participate in more activities and have higher ratings for personal and student benefit. Many faculty reported that funding for professional development activities is limited and that they have a limited amount of time to participate in activities. It is not uncommon for a faculty member to pay out of their own pocket for a worthwhile activity. Activities that deal the most with learning new technologies, such as training in computer skills, retraining for fields in technology, and internships in business or industry, were given the highest ratings of personal and student benefit.</ol> Based on the findings several recommendations and suggestions for future research were made: <ol>Additional research is needed on the actual measures of student benefit, not just perceptions Community college faculty need to carefully select professional development activities that will benefit not only themselves and their student as well. Community college administrators should encourage faculty members to participate in internships in business and industry. Administrators need to do all they can to provide funding for these activities. Additional research is needed on the differences in how males and females rate their perceptions.</ol> Advisors/Committee Members: Eschenmann, Konrad Kurt (committeechair), O'Reilly, Patrick A. (committee member), Hertel, Bradley R. (committee member), Black, Bernadette (committee member), Stewart, Daisy L. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: community college; faculty development; Business Technology and Engineering and Industrial; personal and student benefit of faculty developmen; professional development

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sprenger, K. W. (1999). Perceived Effectiveness of Faculty Development Programs for Full-Time Occupational-Technical Faculty in Virginia Community Colleges. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/29904

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sprenger, Kurt William. “Perceived Effectiveness of Faculty Development Programs for Full-Time Occupational-Technical Faculty in Virginia Community Colleges.” 1999. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed July 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/29904.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sprenger, Kurt William. “Perceived Effectiveness of Faculty Development Programs for Full-Time Occupational-Technical Faculty in Virginia Community Colleges.” 1999. Web. 21 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Sprenger KW. Perceived Effectiveness of Faculty Development Programs for Full-Time Occupational-Technical Faculty in Virginia Community Colleges. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 1999. [cited 2019 Jul 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/29904.

Council of Science Editors:

Sprenger KW. Perceived Effectiveness of Faculty Development Programs for Full-Time Occupational-Technical Faculty in Virginia Community Colleges. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 1999. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/29904

.