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You searched for subject:(Stress diet mindfulness). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Virginia Tech

1. Kennedy, Lauren Elaine. The Examination of Mindfulness, Stress, and Eating Behaviors in Mothers of Young Children.

Degree: PhD, Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise, 2016, Virginia Tech

With the alarming prevalence of overweight and obesity, it is important to explore new approaches and strategies to improve dietary quality and weight status. Recently, a neuropsychological model of obesity was proposed. This new model illustrates an evidencebased relationship between a chronically activated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, due to chronic psychological stress and mood disturbance, and the food reward-related mechanisms within the brain. Intensive mindfulness-based training programs, such as Jon Kabat-Zinn's Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction have demonstrated impressive results with a variety of populations. Given the relationship of stress to eating behavior and the capacity of mindfulness in managing stress, a relationship between mindfulness and eating is expected. The goal of this dissertation research was to help understand the concept of mindful eating and the relationship between stress and eating behavior for mothers of young children in order to inform the development of a mindfulness-based stress management and dietary intervention. The research consisted of three components: 1) an informative photo-elicitation study with working mothers of young children aiming to understand how mothers define, perceive, and experience mindful eating; 2) a crosssectional study investigating the relationship between mindful eating, dietary quality, and stress; and 3) the development and mixed-methods pilot intervention of the Slow Down Program, a mindfulness-based stress management and nutrition program for mothers of young children. Results from these studies give further evidence on how mindfulness can be utilized in nutrition research and they further confirm the success of mindfulness-based training on health and dietary outcomes. This research can inform public health programs and practice to encourage mindfulness, as it relates to dietary behavior, for families and other audiences, as well as future research studies that explore the interaction between mindfulness and eating behaviors. Advisors/Committee Members: Serrano, Elena L. (committeechair), Duffey, Kiyah J. (committee member), Hosig, Kathryn Wright (committee member), Ju, Young Hwa (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Nutrition; maternal stress; mindfulness; diet

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APA (6th Edition):

Kennedy, L. E. (2016). The Examination of Mindfulness, Stress, and Eating Behaviors in Mothers of Young Children. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/70905

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kennedy, Lauren Elaine. “The Examination of Mindfulness, Stress, and Eating Behaviors in Mothers of Young Children.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed September 24, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/70905.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kennedy, Lauren Elaine. “The Examination of Mindfulness, Stress, and Eating Behaviors in Mothers of Young Children.” 2016. Web. 24 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Kennedy LE. The Examination of Mindfulness, Stress, and Eating Behaviors in Mothers of Young Children. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2016. [cited 2020 Sep 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/70905.

Council of Science Editors:

Kennedy LE. The Examination of Mindfulness, Stress, and Eating Behaviors in Mothers of Young Children. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/70905

2. Kuo, Jennifer L. Stress, Eating Behavior, and Mindfulness among College Students.

Degree: MA, Psychology, 2017, The Ohio State University

Prior literature suggests that people who are subjected to acute stress tend to overeat and make more unhealthy food choices. In addition, more mindful people tend to have better health behaviors. However, past research has not evaluated whether mindfulness moderates the relationship between stress and eating behavior. The current study investigated whether mindfulness protected against stress-related eating behavior. This study explored the relationship between stress and eating behavior among 97 undergraduate women. Participants were randomly assigned to the control condition (n = 54, a reading task and simple arithmetic task), or stress condition (n = 43, a job speech and complex arithmetic task). Afterwards, the women were offered red grapes and M&Ms as part of what was described as a taste test to evaluate total caloric intake and food choice (proportion of M & M servings eaten over total servings eaten). Mindfulness did not predict caloric intake or proportion of M & M servings relative to total servings eaten. Additionally, mindfulness did not moderate the relationship between stress and eating behavior. In contrast to previous studies, women consumed fewer total calories in the stress condition compared to those in the control condition. However, greater decreases in positive affect following the TSST were associated with a higher proportion of M & M servings to total servings. Stress itself influences caloric intake, but affective response to stress can alter food choice by increasing unhealthy food preference. High fat, high sugar diets can lead to obesity, which increases risk for many adverse health conditions. Therefore, identifying protective factors for higher emotional reactivity to stress could improve overall health. Advisors/Committee Members: Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Psychology; Stress, diet, mindfulness

mindfulness may protect against stress-related eating (Daubenmier et al., 2011)… …x29;. Mindfulness appears to protect against the negative effects of stress, and may also… …Keesman, 2016). Indeed, mindfulness moderated the relationship between stress and perceived… …behavior. Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) interventions can improve coping… …mindfulness Several mindfulness intervention studies reported that mindfulness lowered stress… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kuo, J. L. (2017). Stress, Eating Behavior, and Mindfulness among College Students. (Masters Thesis). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1494270779255547

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kuo, Jennifer L. “Stress, Eating Behavior, and Mindfulness among College Students.” 2017. Masters Thesis, The Ohio State University. Accessed September 24, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1494270779255547.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kuo, Jennifer L. “Stress, Eating Behavior, and Mindfulness among College Students.” 2017. Web. 24 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Kuo JL. Stress, Eating Behavior, and Mindfulness among College Students. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2017. [cited 2020 Sep 24]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1494270779255547.

Council of Science Editors:

Kuo JL. Stress, Eating Behavior, and Mindfulness among College Students. [Masters Thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2017. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1494270779255547

3. Lucas, Alexander Russell. Lifestyle Interventions For Endometrial Cancer Survivors: Feasibility and Efficacy of a Novel Mindfulness and Dietary Counseling Program.

Degree: PhD, EDU Physical Activity and Educational Services, 2014, The Ohio State University

<b>Introduction:</b> Endometrial cancer (EnCa) is currently the most common form of gynecological cancer affecting women in the United States. In 2014 there was an estimated 56, 230 new cases and 8,590 deaths as a result of the disease. Type I endometrioid cancers, the most common form, are primarily driven by hyperestrogenism linked to excess adiposity and obesity. Despite the prognosis for this form of the disease being good, EnCa survivors are at higher than normal risk of developing chronic diseases associated with lifestyle such as type II diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Finding ways to improve the long-term health of this population of cancer survivors is therefore an important goal. <b>Methods:</b> The current study aimed to i) explore the correlates of physical activity (PA), Diet and quality of life in EnCa survivors and ii) determine the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a novel mindfulness-based intervention coupled with dietary counseling (MIM+Diet) to the same population. <b>Results:</b> In the cross sectional survey 71 type II EnCa survivors reported extremely low levels of physical activity and poor dietary habits, however mean levels of self-reported, health related quality of life (HRQL) were not compromised as compared with US based norms. Findings from the MIM+Diet intervention study revealed improvements in aspects of HRQL (PSQI, FACT-En and RAND SF-36 MHS) but not diet and physical activity (Cohen’s d). Aspects of physical functioning showed improvement as measured by the short physical performance battery (SPPB). <b>Discussion:</b> Future studies need to target the most at risk survivors, as soon after diagnosis as possible to improve long term quality of life and a disease prognosis. Recruitment of EnCa survivors to interventions is a challenge that requires novel approaches that can be tailored on an individual basis. Mindfulness may be one avenue that shows promise in this regard. Advisors/Committee Members: Focht, Brian (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Health Sciences; Behavioral Sciences; Kinesiology; Endometrial Cancer; Lifestyle Behaviors; Physical Activity; Diet; Mindfulness; Quality of Life; HRQL; Stress Reduction; Physical Function

…72 Mindfulness Bases Stress Reduction (MBSR)… …stress response. This mindfulness was hypothesized to aid in the assimilation of the experience… …requires the knowledge of very the specific impacts that physical activity, diet and stress… …These behaviors include diet and or exercise behaviors, sleep, stress and or coping, substance… …Kabat-Zinn called Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR). This is a combination… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lucas, A. R. (2014). Lifestyle Interventions For Endometrial Cancer Survivors: Feasibility and Efficacy of a Novel Mindfulness and Dietary Counseling Program. (Doctoral Dissertation). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1405608622

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lucas, Alexander Russell. “Lifestyle Interventions For Endometrial Cancer Survivors: Feasibility and Efficacy of a Novel Mindfulness and Dietary Counseling Program.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, The Ohio State University. Accessed September 24, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1405608622.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lucas, Alexander Russell. “Lifestyle Interventions For Endometrial Cancer Survivors: Feasibility and Efficacy of a Novel Mindfulness and Dietary Counseling Program.” 2014. Web. 24 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Lucas AR. Lifestyle Interventions For Endometrial Cancer Survivors: Feasibility and Efficacy of a Novel Mindfulness and Dietary Counseling Program. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2014. [cited 2020 Sep 24]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1405608622.

Council of Science Editors:

Lucas AR. Lifestyle Interventions For Endometrial Cancer Survivors: Feasibility and Efficacy of a Novel Mindfulness and Dietary Counseling Program. [Doctoral Dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2014. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1405608622

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