Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

Language: English

You searched for subject:(Story as Methodology). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Minnesota

1. McManimon, Shannon. Storying Literacies, Reimagining Classrooms: Teaching, Research, and Writing as Blurred Translating.

Degree: PhD, Education, Curriculum and Instruction, 2014, University of Minnesota

I theorize teaching and researching as practices of "blurred translating" that center antioppressive education (Kumashiro, 2002) and storytelling (e.g., Frank, 2010; Zipes, 1995, 2004). Based in listening, research and teaching as blurred translating are relational, contextual, and ongoing processes oriented toward transformation and justice that simultaneously recognize what connects us as humans and the separations between us. In this dissertation, I examine this unfinished (Freire, 1998a) metaphor before and after generating data as a participant-observer (using critical ethnographic methods [Madison, 2005]) in a 2012-13 sixth-grade classroom that participated in the weekly Neighborhood Bridges critical literacy and creative drama program. My work there blurred distinctions between teaching, research, and writing, and I utilized writing as my methodology of meaning-making (e.g., Colyar, 2009; Richardson, 2003) to juxtapose multivoiced genres of texts and contexts. Using story and theatre, Neighorhood Bridges attempts to reimagine classrooms as spaces for students to experiment with experiences through playing with words, ideas, and each other. In particular, I explore how these sixth-graders successfully transformed an oral (re)telling of Hermynia Zur Mühlen's story "The Servant" into a play performed in front of schoolmates and family members. Using ideas of counternarrative (e.g., Delgado, 1989) and contexts of identity and production, I also trace and theorize the contested participation of one student, Da'uud, who wasn't at the performance because he had declared their work "too boring now." Thinking with "The Servant" highlighted the intertwined success and mess of the students' individual and collective labor: how students worked – or did not or could not – to become storytellers of their own lives who changed stories and communicated meaning; how they collaborated or did not; and how they utilized tools to (re)tell stories. The success of a Bridges classroom requires risk; humor and imagination; deep listening and abilities to (re)tell stories; student production and ownership of stories and knowledge; and play as both noun and verb. Telling stories such as these as blurred translators in teaching and research can enable the collaborative pedagogical work of creating new – albeit messy and always ongoing – antioppressive educational storylines.

Subjects/Keywords: antioppressive education; critical literacy; pedagogy; story; storytelling; writing as methodology

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McManimon, S. (2014). Storying Literacies, Reimagining Classrooms: Teaching, Research, and Writing as Blurred Translating. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Minnesota. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11299/181781

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McManimon, Shannon. “Storying Literacies, Reimagining Classrooms: Teaching, Research, and Writing as Blurred Translating.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Minnesota. Accessed January 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11299/181781.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McManimon, Shannon. “Storying Literacies, Reimagining Classrooms: Teaching, Research, and Writing as Blurred Translating.” 2014. Web. 27 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

McManimon S. Storying Literacies, Reimagining Classrooms: Teaching, Research, and Writing as Blurred Translating. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Minnesota; 2014. [cited 2020 Jan 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11299/181781.

Council of Science Editors:

McManimon S. Storying Literacies, Reimagining Classrooms: Teaching, Research, and Writing as Blurred Translating. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Minnesota; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11299/181781


Texas State University – San Marcos

2. Pharr, Sharrah. Life as pedagogy: A story of ontology and self-awareness.

Degree: PhD, School Improvement, 2014, Texas State University – San Marcos

Formal, systematic education provides for sequential reasoning of new learning. This qualitative study, is a departure of that normed practice by creating a space to invite the organic nature of relationships, story and the intricacies of a learning journey. Inspired by the spirit of social constructivism through the craft of story, this research emphasizes the need for schools to focus on story as a pedagogical tool. Using life as curriculum, students can connect themselves to the universe, create depth in contextual understanding, and reflect upon their own ontological journey to reach self-awareness. The salience of this research is found within the implementation of story as a teaching and learning method; while, symbiotically weaving a contextual literature of self as a means to explore ontological awareness and the transformation from an individualistic lens to one that is aware of a collective self. Accountability is the ability to stand affirmed for one’s thoughts, actions and lives; to account, one must have witness. How can there be an accountability system without story? We are each other’s witnesses in this world. We make meaning together. Our story is the pedagogy of life. The concept of Pedagogy of Life is the skillful art of teaching life, through another’s personal life story. This research takes you on the ontological journey of four research partners as they make meaning of the world they teach and learn in. This research will also challenge you as a researcher and practitioner to ask of yourself, and of others, “What is your story?” Advisors/Committee Members: Guajardo, Miguel (advisor), Boone, Mike (committee member), Larrotta, Clarena (committee member), Oliver, John (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Life as Pedagogy; Ontology; Self-Awareness, Learning Journey; Story as Research; Story as Methodology; Social Constructivism; Understanding; Meaning Making; Unfinishedness; Reflection; Story; Creating Space; Leadership Development; Ontology; Self-consciousness (Awareness); Internalization; Social perception

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pharr, S. (2014). Life as pedagogy: A story of ontology and self-awareness. (Doctoral Dissertation). Texas State University – San Marcos. Retrieved from https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/5178

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pharr, Sharrah. “Life as pedagogy: A story of ontology and self-awareness.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Texas State University – San Marcos. Accessed January 27, 2020. https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/5178.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pharr, Sharrah. “Life as pedagogy: A story of ontology and self-awareness.” 2014. Web. 27 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Pharr S. Life as pedagogy: A story of ontology and self-awareness. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2014. [cited 2020 Jan 27]. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/5178.

Council of Science Editors:

Pharr S. Life as pedagogy: A story of ontology and self-awareness. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Texas State University – San Marcos; 2014. Available from: https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/5178


AUT University

3. Bright, Charmaine. Counsellors’ Strength-based Practices in Secondary Schools: Managing Multiple Metanarratives .

Degree: AUT University

Secondary school counsellors are often in a pivotal position to affect the lives of our young people and thus the philosophical framework and counselling modalities which inform and influence their practice are significant. This research explores the contribution school counsellors make towards positive youth development using strength-based counselling practices through the lens of a narrative methodology. Strength-based counselling draws from the ethos of positive psychology and focuses on promoting an adolescent’s strengths to enhance their wellbeing rather than focusing on limitations and problems. Most research into strength-based counselling focuses on the wellbeing of adults. Positive outcomes among youth and how these are achieved have received less attention. It is thus important to explore the role counsellors’ strength-based practices play in managing adolescents wellbeing, especially given the high incidence of youth suicide in New Zealand (Mental Health Foundation, 2017; Ministry of Health, 2016). To this end, counsellors in secondary schools in Auckland, New Zealand, were interviewed using semi-structured interviews to elicit their narratives on strength-based counselling. The aims of the research were: To examine the multiple metanarratives available to counsellors in a secondary school context; to make sense of how these metanarratives construct strength-based counselling practices; to examine the potential influence of these constructions on co-creating adolescent wellbeing; and to explore the broader community’s influence on a counsellor’s practice. A distinct method of narrative analysis evolved in two stages: Narrative storyboards for form and content; and Narrative storyboards for context and metanarratives. These storyboards each reflect a different aspect of a counsellor’s narrative thereby adding a depth and richness to the interpretation process. The construction of this method of analysis drew on the research of a selection of authors who engage with narrative as theory and practice (Crossley, 2000; Lieblich, Tuval-Mashiach, & Zilber, 1998; Zilber, Tuval-Mashiach, & Lieblich, 2008). Multiple metanarratives vie for counsellors’ attention and their adherence to their preferred metanarrative are erratic; drawing intermittently on both the traditional deficit metanarrative of the counselling profession as well as the strength metanarrative of strength-based counselling. The meanings counsellors assign to these metanarratives and the educational/counselling theories and school/systemic policies that underpin them may either encourage or discourage strength-based counselling in schools. This thesis further introduces a model for co-creating adolescent wellbeing using a strength-based counselling approach. Drawing from counsellors’ narratives and counselling processes this model for co-creating adolescent wellbeing may assist counsellors in a practical way: it provides school counsellors with a foundation from which to think about their practice in a strength-based manner but… Advisors/Committee Members: Devine, Nesta (advisor), Du Preez, Elizabeth (advisor), Goedeke, Sonja (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Strength-based counselling; School counsellors; Positive psychology; Narrative; Metanarrative; Adolescent; Strength-based; Deficit-based; Counselling; Social constructionism; Critical realism; Narrative methodology; Secondary schools; Resilience; Lieblich, Tuval-Maschiach, Zilber; Crossley; Context; Community support; Strength-based model; Well-being; Winslade; Four modes of reading a narrative; Categorical-content; Three-sphere model of external context; Construction of a method of narrative analysis; Narrative analysis; School context; Counselling in a school context; Researcher as co-constructionist; Story-map grid; Heuristic device; Embedded narratives; Counsellor context; Adolescent context; Community context; Family context; Tensions; Foucault

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bright, C. (n.d.). Counsellors’ Strength-based Practices in Secondary Schools: Managing Multiple Metanarratives . (Thesis). AUT University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10292/11576

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bright, Charmaine. “Counsellors’ Strength-based Practices in Secondary Schools: Managing Multiple Metanarratives .” Thesis, AUT University. Accessed January 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10292/11576.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bright, Charmaine. “Counsellors’ Strength-based Practices in Secondary Schools: Managing Multiple Metanarratives .” Web. 27 Jan 2020.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Bright C. Counsellors’ Strength-based Practices in Secondary Schools: Managing Multiple Metanarratives . [Internet] [Thesis]. AUT University; [cited 2020 Jan 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/11576.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Bright C. Counsellors’ Strength-based Practices in Secondary Schools: Managing Multiple Metanarratives . [Thesis]. AUT University; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/11576

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

.