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You searched for subject:(Steroid hormones Biodegradation). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Colorado State University

1. Yang, Yun-Ya. Degradation and transport pathways of steroid hormones from human and animal waste.

Degree: PhD, Soil and Crop Sciences, 2007, Colorado State University

Steroid hormones have been widely detected in various environmental matrices, including soils, groundwater, surface water, and sediments. Agricultural operations where manure and biosolids are applied as fertilizers and soil amendments are potential sources of steroid hormones to the environment. The aim of this research is to assess the potential for surface runoff and to elucidate biodegradation pathways of steroid hormones from human and animal waste, respectively. A field-scale study was conducted to assess the potential for runoff of seventeen different steroid hormones from an agricultural field applied with biosolids at an agronomic rate and the major runoff mechanisms. Steroid hormones were present in runoff from the biosolids amended agricultural field, and high concentrations of androgens and progesterone were observed in the runoff even after multiple rainfall events and up to one month after biosolids application. The observed correlation between rainfall amount and hormone mass flux suggests that intense rainfall promotes hormone runoff. Hormones were found to be transported primarily in the aqueous phase or by particles smaller than 0.7 µm. The potential for biodegradation of testosterone, 17β-estradiol and progesterone by swine (Sus scrofa) manure-borne bacteria was examined, and the impact of different environmental factors on testosterone degradation kinetics was determined. Testosterone, 17β-estradiol and progesterone were rapidly degraded under aerobic conditions, and testosterone has the potential for degradation by manure-borne bacteria under a wide range of environmentally relevant conditions. Finally, a study was conducted to enrich manure-borne bacteria capable of testosterone degradation and to elucidate the testosterone mineralization pathway by the enriched bacteria under aerobic conditions. Six DNA sequences of bacteria from the Proteobacteria phylum were identified in a testosterone-degrading enriched culture, suggesting that Proteobacteria may play an important environmental role in the degradation of testosterone and other similar structural compounds. The microbial enrichment caused 48% of the added 14C-testosterone to be mineralized to 14CO2 within 8 days of incubation. The findings in this dissertation contribute important information that will help improve our current understanding of the environmental fate of steroid hormones as well as assist in the development of best management practices for biosolids and manure. Advisors/Committee Members: Borch, Thomas (advisor), Davis, J. G. (Jessica Gwyn), 1962- (committee member), Barbarick, Kenneth Arthur (committee member), Goodridge, Lawrence David, 1971-. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: transport; steroid hormones; biosolids; manure; degradation; Steroid hormones  – Biodegradation; Steroid hormones  – Environmental aspects; Sewage sludge; Testosterone  – Biodegradation; Sewage purification

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Yang, Y. (2007). Degradation and transport pathways of steroid hormones from human and animal waste. (Doctoral Dissertation). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/45980

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yang, Yun-Ya. “Degradation and transport pathways of steroid hormones from human and animal waste.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Colorado State University. Accessed December 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/45980.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yang, Yun-Ya. “Degradation and transport pathways of steroid hormones from human and animal waste.” 2007. Web. 13 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Yang Y. Degradation and transport pathways of steroid hormones from human and animal waste. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2007. [cited 2019 Dec 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/45980.

Council of Science Editors:

Yang Y. Degradation and transport pathways of steroid hormones from human and animal waste. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/45980

2. Arwood, Bryan Stuart. The effectiveness of advanced oxidation techniques in degrading steroids in wastewater.

Degree: MS, 2010, University of Alabama – Birmingham

Recently there has been growing concern about environmental estrogens and their effects on the health of humans and wildlife. Many compounds of human origin have been shown to act as estrogens with the potential to disrupt the endocrine systems of wildlife and humans, and thus have been classified as endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). EDCs have been shown to occur worldwide in various aquatic habitats. Of the EDC’s, one of the most potent is 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2), a synthetic estrogen found in birth control pills. Estrogens are excreted by females in the urine and end up in the wastewater, resulting in their accumulation at wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). While WWTPs are successful at removing many organic compounds from wastewater, they frequently fail to remove steroidal compounds efficiently. Current methods of wastewater treatment use biodegradation and sedimentation, two conventional treatment processes, which do not efficiently break down or remove environmental estrogens in wastewater. Thus, there is a need to improve the effectiveness of treatment methods for removing these ubiquitous and generally recalcitrant endocrine-disrupting substances from wastewater. A treatment method currently being proposed uses various methods of oxidation in order to more effectively break down environmental estrogens in wastewater. Collectively these methods are termed advanced oxidation techniques (AOTs). The current study investigated the effectiveness of three AOT methods, UV photolysis, ozonolysis, and sonication, singly and in combination, at breaking down EE2 in water. Samples of deionized water were spiked with EE2 (1mM) and treated for various lengths of time and then analyzed using reverse phase high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) to compare the amount of remaining EE2 with that in the spiked water sample. In addition, the treated samples were then tested for residual estrogenic activity using the yeast estrogen screening assay (YES assay). The results illustrate the effectiveness of ozonolysis, UV photolysis, and sonication at breaking down EE2 in water—when coupled together. The objective was not necessarily to completely destroy these substances, but to break open the steroid rings so that microbes can degrade them more effectively during the wastewater treatment process.

M.S.

1 online resource (x, 43 p.) : ill. (some col.), digital, PDF file.

Biology

College of Arts and Sciences

Advanced oxidation techniques Endocrine disrupting compounds 17-α ethynylestradiol High pressure liquid chromatography Wastewater treatment plant Yeast estrogen screen

UNRESTRICTED

Advisors/Committee Members: Angus, Robert A., Watson, R.D. <br>, Peters, Robert W..

Subjects/Keywords: Water  – Purification  – Oxidation <; br>; Steroid hormones  – Biodegradation <; br>; Sewage  – Purification <; br>; Endocrine disrupting chemicals  – Environmental aspects <; br>; Water  – Purification  – Ozonization <; br>; Water  – Purification  – Sonication <; br>; Flash photolysis

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Arwood, B. S. (2010). The effectiveness of advanced oxidation techniques in degrading steroids in wastewater. (Masters Thesis). University of Alabama – Birmingham. Retrieved from http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,623

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Arwood, Bryan Stuart. “The effectiveness of advanced oxidation techniques in degrading steroids in wastewater.” 2010. Masters Thesis, University of Alabama – Birmingham. Accessed December 13, 2019. http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,623.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Arwood, Bryan Stuart. “The effectiveness of advanced oxidation techniques in degrading steroids in wastewater.” 2010. Web. 13 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Arwood BS. The effectiveness of advanced oxidation techniques in degrading steroids in wastewater. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2010. [cited 2019 Dec 13]. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,623.

Council of Science Editors:

Arwood BS. The effectiveness of advanced oxidation techniques in degrading steroids in wastewater. [Masters Thesis]. University of Alabama – Birmingham; 2010. Available from: http://contentdm.mhsl.uab.edu/u?/etd,623

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