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You searched for subject:(Sporosarcina pasteurii). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Michigan Technological University

1. Buikema, Noah D. STABILIZATION OF IRON MINE TAILINGS THROUGH MICROBIALLY INDUCED CALCITE PRECIPITATION.

Degree: MS, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2015, Michigan Technological University

Mine tailings are deposited into large-scale impoundments. Seasonal temperature fluctuations destabilize particles on the impoundment surface. Wind-induced shear stresses on the destabilized particles can in turn result in suspension of micron-sized particles into the atmosphere, creating dust storms that pose hazards to humans and the environment. Thus, efficient and sustainable methods of dust abatement are needed. One novel method for controlling dust emissions is biomodification. For example, Sporosarcina pasteurii can promote biocalcification in soil via ureolysis. However, application of this method to fined grained materials, such as mine tailings, is challenging. The goal of this work was to perform a proof-of-concept demonstration of biocalcification applied to mine tailings, and examine the associated strength increase at the soil surface. Laboratory experiments coupled with multiple analytical methods were used to confirm the formation of the surface crust, and its impact on strength. Crust formation was demonstrated with S. pasteurii and native microorganisms. Advisors/Committee Members: Eric A. Seagren.

Subjects/Keywords: Dust; Fine grained; Iron; Mine tailings; Sporosarcina pasteurii; Strength; Civil Engineering; Environmental Engineering

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Buikema, N. D. (2015). STABILIZATION OF IRON MINE TAILINGS THROUGH MICROBIALLY INDUCED CALCITE PRECIPITATION. (Masters Thesis). Michigan Technological University. Retrieved from http://digitalcommons.mtu.edu/etds/981

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Buikema, Noah D. “STABILIZATION OF IRON MINE TAILINGS THROUGH MICROBIALLY INDUCED CALCITE PRECIPITATION.” 2015. Masters Thesis, Michigan Technological University. Accessed June 20, 2019. http://digitalcommons.mtu.edu/etds/981.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Buikema, Noah D. “STABILIZATION OF IRON MINE TAILINGS THROUGH MICROBIALLY INDUCED CALCITE PRECIPITATION.” 2015. Web. 20 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Buikema ND. STABILIZATION OF IRON MINE TAILINGS THROUGH MICROBIALLY INDUCED CALCITE PRECIPITATION. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Michigan Technological University; 2015. [cited 2019 Jun 20]. Available from: http://digitalcommons.mtu.edu/etds/981.

Council of Science Editors:

Buikema ND. STABILIZATION OF IRON MINE TAILINGS THROUGH MICROBIALLY INDUCED CALCITE PRECIPITATION. [Masters Thesis]. Michigan Technological University; 2015. Available from: http://digitalcommons.mtu.edu/etds/981


University of Houston

2. -9978-6263. Carbon Dioxide Sequestration through Microbially-Induced Calcium Carbonate Precipitation Using Ureolytic Environmental Microorganisms.

Degree: Civil and Environmental Engineering, Department of, 2015, University of Houston

The development of affordable and eco-friendly strategies for carbon dioxide sequestration has become a matter of paramount importance to reduce or mitigate the effects of global climate changes. Today, the most used solution to sequester CO2 is its immobilization in geological reservoirs, commonly referred to as carbon capture and storage; however this technique is not completely reliable because of leakage risks, when storing vast quantities of CO2 in geological strata. Alternatively, precipitation of CO2 as solid carbonates may constitute an alternative strategy for carbon immobilization. The reaction to form calcium carbonates is generally not chemically favorable in the environment, unless at pH values higher than 9. On the other hand, microorganisms, through metabolic activities, have been shown to induce calcium carbonate precipitation, provided that certain environmental conditions are met. In this dissertation, I investigate the diversity and physiology of diverse ureolytic consortia and isolates able to induce calcium carbonate precipitation to better understand their roles in carbon sequestration. These microorganisms were obtained from karstic environments that are rich in calcium and present natural input of urea, which are considered to be key factors in calcium carbonate precipitation. These urease-positive microorganisms were classified phylogenetically and their physiology was investigated. The relationship amongst urease activity, microbially-induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICP), and carbon sequestration by the different consortia and isolates were shown to be dependent on the species and directly influenced by their growth conditions. Advisors/Committee Members: Rodrigues, Debora F. (advisor), Hu, Yandi (committee member), Rixey, William G. (committee member), Cooper, Timothy F. (committee member), Willson, Richard C. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Calcium carbonate; precipitation; CO2 sequestration; bacterial isolates; bacterial consortia; cave; travertine; Sporosarcina pasteurii.

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

-9978-6263. (2015). Carbon Dioxide Sequestration through Microbially-Induced Calcium Carbonate Precipitation Using Ureolytic Environmental Microorganisms. (Thesis). University of Houston. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10657/2021

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

-9978-6263. “Carbon Dioxide Sequestration through Microbially-Induced Calcium Carbonate Precipitation Using Ureolytic Environmental Microorganisms.” 2015. Thesis, University of Houston. Accessed June 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10657/2021.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

-9978-6263. “Carbon Dioxide Sequestration through Microbially-Induced Calcium Carbonate Precipitation Using Ureolytic Environmental Microorganisms.” 2015. Web. 20 Jun 2019.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Vancouver:

-9978-6263. Carbon Dioxide Sequestration through Microbially-Induced Calcium Carbonate Precipitation Using Ureolytic Environmental Microorganisms. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Houston; 2015. [cited 2019 Jun 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/2021.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

-9978-6263. Carbon Dioxide Sequestration through Microbially-Induced Calcium Carbonate Precipitation Using Ureolytic Environmental Microorganisms. [Thesis]. University of Houston; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10657/2021

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Basaran, Zeynep. Biomineralization in cement based materials : inoculation of vegetative cells.

Degree: Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, 2013, University of Texas – Austin

Recently, self-healing applications of cement-based materials have received a lot of interest. One major area of interest with respect to self-healing applications in cement-based systems focuses on using biomineralization processes. Biomineralization is biochemical process in which microorganisms stimulate the formation of minerals. The existing research on biomineralization in cement-based systems has showed promising results and the studies suggest that biomineralization could be a useful approach for remediation of cracks on the surface of concrete. This dissertation presents the results of an intensive study undertaken to understand the influence of vegetative bacteria, specifically Sporosarcina pasteurii (S. pasteurii), when it is incorporated within cement paste. Vegetative S. pasteurii cells were suspended in a urea-yeast extract medium and this medium was mixed with cement. The influence of the vegetative S. pasteurii cells on Portland cement paste properties, such as compressive strength, hydration kinetics, and setting time was evaluated. It was determined that the hydration kinetics was highly influenced when the bacterial medium was used to prepare cement paste, and severe retardation was observed. It was also observed that an increase in calcium carbonate precipitation, particularly calcite, occurred within cement paste when the bacterial medium was used. Furthermore, use of the bacterial medium resulted in reducing the porosity and increasing the compressive strength of the hardened paste. Ex-situ culture experiments were conducted to determine the impact of pH and calcium concentration on the morphology of calcium carbonate precipitate; the results indicated that the morphology of the precipitate was more influenced by calcium concentration. A key focus of this dissertation was to examine the viability of the vegetative cells that were inoculated in cement paste. Viable S. pasteurii cells were found to be present in hardened cement paste samples that were as old as 330-days, and 50% of the viable cells detected were defined as vegetative cells. At last, the use of including internal nutrient reservoirs as a means to extend the viability of the bacterial cells within hardened cement paste was explored. The results showed that the percentage of vegetative cells remaining was affected when internal nutrient reservoirs was incorporated into the system. Advisors/Committee Members: Ferron, Raissa D. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Biomineralization; Sporosarcina pasteurii; Metabolic state; Vegetative cell

Sporosarcina pasteurii (formerly Bacillus pasteurii) in 600 mL Urea-Yeast extract medium… …based materials provided by inoculation of vegetative Sporosarcina pasteurii cells. Vegetative… …particles with calcium carbonate precipitated via the bacterium Sporosarcina pasteurii (… …ammonia. Due to its alkaliphilic nature and urease enzyme activity, Sporosarcina pasteurii (… …concrete by organic capsules with calcium lactate Sporosarcina pasteurii (Bacillus… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Basaran, Z. (2013). Biomineralization in cement based materials : inoculation of vegetative cells. (Thesis). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/21141

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Basaran, Zeynep. “Biomineralization in cement based materials : inoculation of vegetative cells.” 2013. Thesis, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed June 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/21141.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Basaran, Zeynep. “Biomineralization in cement based materials : inoculation of vegetative cells.” 2013. Web. 20 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Basaran Z. Biomineralization in cement based materials : inoculation of vegetative cells. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2013. [cited 2019 Jun 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/21141.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Basaran Z. Biomineralization in cement based materials : inoculation of vegetative cells. [Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/21141

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.