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You searched for subject:(Spoken word recognition). Showing records 1 – 30 of 45 total matches.

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University of California – Merced

1. Spivey, Cynthia Diane. Between-Language Competition in Early-Learner Bilinguals.

Degree: Psychological Sciences, 2018, University of California – Merced

 To better understand the neural and cognitive functions of bilingual brains, recent research has begun to study both the general cognitive abilities of bilinguals and… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cognitive psychology; Language; Bilingual education; Bilingualism; Eyetracking; Psycholinguistics; Spoken word recognition

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APA (6th Edition):

Spivey, C. D. (2018). Between-Language Competition in Early-Learner Bilinguals. (Thesis). University of California – Merced. Retrieved from http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/0384x6xt

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Spivey, Cynthia Diane. “Between-Language Competition in Early-Learner Bilinguals.” 2018. Thesis, University of California – Merced. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/0384x6xt.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Spivey, Cynthia Diane. “Between-Language Competition in Early-Learner Bilinguals.” 2018. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Spivey CD. Between-Language Competition in Early-Learner Bilinguals. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of California – Merced; 2018. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/0384x6xt.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Spivey CD. Between-Language Competition in Early-Learner Bilinguals. [Thesis]. University of California – Merced; 2018. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/0384x6xt

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Oregon

2. Teruya, Hideko. Deciding to Look: Revisiting the Link between Lexical Activations and Eye Movements in the Visual World Paradigm in Japanese.

Degree: PhD, Department of Linguistics, 2019, University of Oregon

 All current theories of spoken word recognition (e.g., Allopenna et al., 1998; McClelland & Elman, 1986; Norris, 1994) suggest that any part of a target… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Decision making; Eye movements; Japanese; Linking hypothesis; Spoken word recognition; TRACE

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APA (6th Edition):

Teruya, H. (2019). Deciding to Look: Revisiting the Link between Lexical Activations and Eye Movements in the Visual World Paradigm in Japanese. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Oregon. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1794/24212

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Teruya, Hideko. “Deciding to Look: Revisiting the Link between Lexical Activations and Eye Movements in the Visual World Paradigm in Japanese.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Oregon. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1794/24212.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Teruya, Hideko. “Deciding to Look: Revisiting the Link between Lexical Activations and Eye Movements in the Visual World Paradigm in Japanese.” 2019. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Teruya H. Deciding to Look: Revisiting the Link between Lexical Activations and Eye Movements in the Visual World Paradigm in Japanese. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Oregon; 2019. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1794/24212.

Council of Science Editors:

Teruya H. Deciding to Look: Revisiting the Link between Lexical Activations and Eye Movements in the Visual World Paradigm in Japanese. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Oregon; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1794/24212


University of Western Ontario

3. Cross, Alexandra M. Eyetracking of Coarticulatory Cue Responses in Children and Adults.

Degree: 2015, University of Western Ontario

 Studies examining sensitivity to coarticulatory cues during spoken word recognition have typically examined children and adults separately. The present thesis compared sensitivity to coarticulatory cues… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: language; spoken word recognition; eyetracking; coarticulation; development; Cognition and Perception

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APA (6th Edition):

Cross, A. M. (2015). Eyetracking of Coarticulatory Cue Responses in Children and Adults. (Thesis). University of Western Ontario. Retrieved from https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/2971

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cross, Alexandra M. “Eyetracking of Coarticulatory Cue Responses in Children and Adults.” 2015. Thesis, University of Western Ontario. Accessed October 26, 2020. https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/2971.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cross, Alexandra M. “Eyetracking of Coarticulatory Cue Responses in Children and Adults.” 2015. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Cross AM. Eyetracking of Coarticulatory Cue Responses in Children and Adults. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Western Ontario; 2015. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/2971.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Cross AM. Eyetracking of Coarticulatory Cue Responses in Children and Adults. [Thesis]. University of Western Ontario; 2015. Available from: https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/2971

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


The Ohio State University

4. Shin, Jeonghwa. Prosodic Effects on Spoken Word Recognition in Second Language:Processing of Lexical Stress by Korean-speaking Learners of English.

Degree: PhD, Linguistics, 2012, The Ohio State University

 Prosody is known to influence how listeners interpret the sequence of sounds, syllables, and higher order organizational units and thus how lexical access proceeds during… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Linguistics; Lexical stress; spoken word recognition; Korean-speaking learners of English

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APA (6th Edition):

Shin, J. (2012). Prosodic Effects on Spoken Word Recognition in Second Language:Processing of Lexical Stress by Korean-speaking Learners of English. (Doctoral Dissertation). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1338388308

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Shin, Jeonghwa. “Prosodic Effects on Spoken Word Recognition in Second Language:Processing of Lexical Stress by Korean-speaking Learners of English.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, The Ohio State University. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1338388308.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Shin, Jeonghwa. “Prosodic Effects on Spoken Word Recognition in Second Language:Processing of Lexical Stress by Korean-speaking Learners of English.” 2012. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Shin J. Prosodic Effects on Spoken Word Recognition in Second Language:Processing of Lexical Stress by Korean-speaking Learners of English. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2012. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1338388308.

Council of Science Editors:

Shin J. Prosodic Effects on Spoken Word Recognition in Second Language:Processing of Lexical Stress by Korean-speaking Learners of English. [Doctoral Dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2012. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1338388308


Cleveland State University

5. Farrell, Megan M. Examining the electrophysiology of long-term priming: Repetition and talker specificity effects on spoken word recognition.

Degree: MAin Psychology, College of Sciences and Health Professions, 2020, Cleveland State University

 Our knowledge of how spoken words are represented in the brain is currently limited. In this study, we aimed to probe the representation of spoken(more)

Subjects/Keywords: Psychology; Spoken word recognition; ERP; Time-course hypothesis; long-term priming

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APA (6th Edition):

Farrell, M. M. (2020). Examining the electrophysiology of long-term priming: Repetition and talker specificity effects on spoken word recognition. (Masters Thesis). Cleveland State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu159008117475003

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Farrell, Megan M. “Examining the electrophysiology of long-term priming: Repetition and talker specificity effects on spoken word recognition.” 2020. Masters Thesis, Cleveland State University. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu159008117475003.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Farrell, Megan M. “Examining the electrophysiology of long-term priming: Repetition and talker specificity effects on spoken word recognition.” 2020. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Farrell MM. Examining the electrophysiology of long-term priming: Repetition and talker specificity effects on spoken word recognition. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Cleveland State University; 2020. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu159008117475003.

Council of Science Editors:

Farrell MM. Examining the electrophysiology of long-term priming: Repetition and talker specificity effects on spoken word recognition. [Masters Thesis]. Cleveland State University; 2020. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu159008117475003


University of Rochester

6. Merickel, Jennifer; Aslin, Richard N. Learning and processing of perceptual confusability and the mapping of form to meaning.

Degree: PhD, 2015, University of Rochester

 Throughout this research, we utilize an artificial lexicon that manipulates visual and acoustic confusability. We use this lexicon to ask how perceptual confusability impacts learning… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Word learning; Eye tracking; Spoken word recognition; Artificial lexica; Cohort competition; Arbitrariness; Visual world paradigm

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APA (6th Edition):

Merickel, Jennifer; Aslin, R. N. (2015). Learning and processing of perceptual confusability and the mapping of form to meaning. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Rochester. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1802/30087

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Merickel, Jennifer; Aslin, Richard N. “Learning and processing of perceptual confusability and the mapping of form to meaning.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Rochester. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1802/30087.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Merickel, Jennifer; Aslin, Richard N. “Learning and processing of perceptual confusability and the mapping of form to meaning.” 2015. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Merickel, Jennifer; Aslin RN. Learning and processing of perceptual confusability and the mapping of form to meaning. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Rochester; 2015. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1802/30087.

Council of Science Editors:

Merickel, Jennifer; Aslin RN. Learning and processing of perceptual confusability and the mapping of form to meaning. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Rochester; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1802/30087


University of Kansas

7. Siew, Cynthia S. Q. THE PHONOGRAPHIC NETWORK OF LANGUAGE: USING NETWORK SCIENCE TO INVESTIGATE THE PHONOLOGICAL AND ORTHOGRAPHIC SIMILARITY STRUCTURE OF LANGUAGE.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2017, University of Kansas

 Orthographic effects in spoken word recognition and phonological effects in visual word recognition have been observed in a variety of behavioral experimental paradigms, strongly suggesting… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Language; Cognitive psychology; Psychology; clustering coefficient; language processing; multiplex; network science; spoken word recognition; visual word recognition

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APA (6th Edition):

Siew, C. S. Q. (2017). THE PHONOGRAPHIC NETWORK OF LANGUAGE: USING NETWORK SCIENCE TO INVESTIGATE THE PHONOLOGICAL AND ORTHOGRAPHIC SIMILARITY STRUCTURE OF LANGUAGE. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Kansas. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1808/26028

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Siew, Cynthia S Q. “THE PHONOGRAPHIC NETWORK OF LANGUAGE: USING NETWORK SCIENCE TO INVESTIGATE THE PHONOLOGICAL AND ORTHOGRAPHIC SIMILARITY STRUCTURE OF LANGUAGE.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Kansas. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1808/26028.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Siew, Cynthia S Q. “THE PHONOGRAPHIC NETWORK OF LANGUAGE: USING NETWORK SCIENCE TO INVESTIGATE THE PHONOLOGICAL AND ORTHOGRAPHIC SIMILARITY STRUCTURE OF LANGUAGE.” 2017. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Siew CSQ. THE PHONOGRAPHIC NETWORK OF LANGUAGE: USING NETWORK SCIENCE TO INVESTIGATE THE PHONOLOGICAL AND ORTHOGRAPHIC SIMILARITY STRUCTURE OF LANGUAGE. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2017. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/26028.

Council of Science Editors:

Siew CSQ. THE PHONOGRAPHIC NETWORK OF LANGUAGE: USING NETWORK SCIENCE TO INVESTIGATE THE PHONOLOGICAL AND ORTHOGRAPHIC SIMILARITY STRUCTURE OF LANGUAGE. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/26028


University of Rochester

8. Brown, Meredith. Interpreting prosodic variation in context.

Degree: PhD, 2014, University of Rochester

 This dissertation reports novel evidence that listeners evaluate the prosodic characteristics of speech with respect to surrounding linguistic context, and that these prosodic expectations influence… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Expectations; Language processing; Prosody; Speech perception; Spoken word recognition; Visual world Paradigm; Generative models

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APA (6th Edition):

Brown, M. (2014). Interpreting prosodic variation in context. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Rochester. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1802/28876

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Brown, Meredith. “Interpreting prosodic variation in context.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Rochester. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1802/28876.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Brown, Meredith. “Interpreting prosodic variation in context.” 2014. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Brown M. Interpreting prosodic variation in context. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Rochester; 2014. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1802/28876.

Council of Science Editors:

Brown M. Interpreting prosodic variation in context. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Rochester; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1802/28876


University of Rochester

9. Pontillo, Daniel. Object naming in visual search tasks.

Degree: PhD, 2018, University of Rochester

 When processing spoken words during visual search tasks, people rapidly plan and execute eye movements towards objects that are consistent with the unfolding speech. Although… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cognitive science; Eye tracking; Object naming; Psycholinguistics; Spoken word recognition; Visual search.

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APA (6th Edition):

Pontillo, D. (2018). Object naming in visual search tasks. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Rochester. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1802/33451

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pontillo, Daniel. “Object naming in visual search tasks.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Rochester. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1802/33451.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pontillo, Daniel. “Object naming in visual search tasks.” 2018. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Pontillo D. Object naming in visual search tasks. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Rochester; 2018. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1802/33451.

Council of Science Editors:

Pontillo D. Object naming in visual search tasks. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Rochester; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1802/33451


University of Ottawa

10. Desmeules-Trudel, Félix. Spoken Word Recognition in Native and Second Language Canadian French: Phonetic Detail and Representation of Vowel Nasalization .

Degree: 2018, University of Ottawa

 Research has shown that fine-grained consonantal phonetic information can be gradiently integrated during spoken word recognition in the L1. However, the way listeners categorize vocalic… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Spoken word recognition; Vowel nasalization; Second language; Speech perception; Canadian French; Phonetics-phonology interface

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APA (6th Edition):

Desmeules-Trudel, F. (2018). Spoken Word Recognition in Native and Second Language Canadian French: Phonetic Detail and Representation of Vowel Nasalization . (Thesis). University of Ottawa. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10393/37958

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Desmeules-Trudel, Félix. “Spoken Word Recognition in Native and Second Language Canadian French: Phonetic Detail and Representation of Vowel Nasalization .” 2018. Thesis, University of Ottawa. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10393/37958.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Desmeules-Trudel, Félix. “Spoken Word Recognition in Native and Second Language Canadian French: Phonetic Detail and Representation of Vowel Nasalization .” 2018. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Desmeules-Trudel F. Spoken Word Recognition in Native and Second Language Canadian French: Phonetic Detail and Representation of Vowel Nasalization . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Ottawa; 2018. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/37958.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Desmeules-Trudel F. Spoken Word Recognition in Native and Second Language Canadian French: Phonetic Detail and Representation of Vowel Nasalization . [Thesis]. University of Ottawa; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/37958

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Toronto

11. Mohaghegh, Mercedeh. Connected Speech Processes and Lexical Access in Real-time Comprehension.

Degree: PhD, 2016, University of Toronto

 Connected speech can entail variability in the production of speech sounds. This can in turn create ambiguity at the lexical level. For example, the word(more)

Subjects/Keywords: Eye tracking; Phonological variation; Place assimilation; Process priming; Speech perception; Spoken word recognition; 0290

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APA (6th Edition):

Mohaghegh, M. (2016). Connected Speech Processes and Lexical Access in Real-time Comprehension. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/76565

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mohaghegh, Mercedeh. “Connected Speech Processes and Lexical Access in Real-time Comprehension.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/76565.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mohaghegh, Mercedeh. “Connected Speech Processes and Lexical Access in Real-time Comprehension.” 2016. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Mohaghegh M. Connected Speech Processes and Lexical Access in Real-time Comprehension. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2016. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/76565.

Council of Science Editors:

Mohaghegh M. Connected Speech Processes and Lexical Access in Real-time Comprehension. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/76565


University of Arizona

12. Good, Erin. The Processing and Acquisition of Two English Contours .

Degree: 2008, University of Arizona

 The primary claim of this dissertation is that children and adults process language in the same manner, meaning that when children are acquiring their first… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: prosody; processing; spoken word recognition; acquisition

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APA (6th Edition):

Good, E. (2008). The Processing and Acquisition of Two English Contours . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Arizona. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195900

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Good, Erin. “The Processing and Acquisition of Two English Contours .” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Arizona. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195900.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Good, Erin. “The Processing and Acquisition of Two English Contours .” 2008. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Good E. The Processing and Acquisition of Two English Contours . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2008. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195900.

Council of Science Editors:

Good E. The Processing and Acquisition of Two English Contours . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Arizona; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10150/195900


University of Kansas

13. Chan, Kit Ying. WHERE IS THE LOCUS OF DIFFICULTY IN RECOGNIZING FOREIGN-ACCENTED WORDS? NEIGHBORHOOD DENSITY AND PHONOTACTIC PROBABILITY EFFECTS ON THE RECOGNITION OF FOREIGN-ACCENTED WORDS BY NATIVE ENGLISH LISTENERS.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2012, University of Kansas

 This series of experiments (1) examined whether native listeners experience recognition difficulty in all kinds of foreign-accented words or only in a subset of words… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cognitive psychology; Foreign accent; Neighborhood density; Phonotactic probability; Speech perception; Spoken word recognition

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APA (6th Edition):

Chan, K. Y. (2012). WHERE IS THE LOCUS OF DIFFICULTY IN RECOGNIZING FOREIGN-ACCENTED WORDS? NEIGHBORHOOD DENSITY AND PHONOTACTIC PROBABILITY EFFECTS ON THE RECOGNITION OF FOREIGN-ACCENTED WORDS BY NATIVE ENGLISH LISTENERS. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Kansas. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1808/10325

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chan, Kit Ying. “WHERE IS THE LOCUS OF DIFFICULTY IN RECOGNIZING FOREIGN-ACCENTED WORDS? NEIGHBORHOOD DENSITY AND PHONOTACTIC PROBABILITY EFFECTS ON THE RECOGNITION OF FOREIGN-ACCENTED WORDS BY NATIVE ENGLISH LISTENERS.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Kansas. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1808/10325.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chan, Kit Ying. “WHERE IS THE LOCUS OF DIFFICULTY IN RECOGNIZING FOREIGN-ACCENTED WORDS? NEIGHBORHOOD DENSITY AND PHONOTACTIC PROBABILITY EFFECTS ON THE RECOGNITION OF FOREIGN-ACCENTED WORDS BY NATIVE ENGLISH LISTENERS.” 2012. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Chan KY. WHERE IS THE LOCUS OF DIFFICULTY IN RECOGNIZING FOREIGN-ACCENTED WORDS? NEIGHBORHOOD DENSITY AND PHONOTACTIC PROBABILITY EFFECTS ON THE RECOGNITION OF FOREIGN-ACCENTED WORDS BY NATIVE ENGLISH LISTENERS. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2012. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/10325.

Council of Science Editors:

Chan KY. WHERE IS THE LOCUS OF DIFFICULTY IN RECOGNIZING FOREIGN-ACCENTED WORDS? NEIGHBORHOOD DENSITY AND PHONOTACTIC PROBABILITY EFFECTS ON THE RECOGNITION OF FOREIGN-ACCENTED WORDS BY NATIVE ENGLISH LISTENERS. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Kansas; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/10325


University of Rochester

14. Bardhan, Neil Prodeep (1982 - ). Adults’ self-directed learning of an artificial lexicon : the dynamics of neighborhood reorganization.

Degree: PhD, 2010, University of Rochester

 Artificial lexicons have previously been used to examine the time course of the learning and recognition of spoken words, the role of segment type in… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Psycholinguistics; Spoken word recognition; Mental lexicon; Artificial lexicon

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APA (6th Edition):

Bardhan, N. P. (. -. ). (2010). Adults’ self-directed learning of an artificial lexicon : the dynamics of neighborhood reorganization. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Rochester. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1802/12687

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bardhan, Neil Prodeep (1982 - ). “Adults’ self-directed learning of an artificial lexicon : the dynamics of neighborhood reorganization.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Rochester. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1802/12687.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bardhan, Neil Prodeep (1982 - ). “Adults’ self-directed learning of an artificial lexicon : the dynamics of neighborhood reorganization.” 2010. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Bardhan NP(-). Adults’ self-directed learning of an artificial lexicon : the dynamics of neighborhood reorganization. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Rochester; 2010. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1802/12687.

Council of Science Editors:

Bardhan NP(-). Adults’ self-directed learning of an artificial lexicon : the dynamics of neighborhood reorganization. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Rochester; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1802/12687


McMaster University

15. Kramer, Samantha. Neural responses demonstrate the dynamicity of speech perception.

Degree: MSc, 2014, McMaster University

Spoken language is produced with a great deal of variability with which listeners must be able to cope. One source of variation is coarticulation, which… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: N100; P200; PMN; phonological mapping negativity; phonology; EEG; elecroencephalography; ERP; event-related potentials; subphonemic; cues; features; spoken word recognition

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APA (6th Edition):

Kramer, S. (2014). Neural responses demonstrate the dynamicity of speech perception. (Masters Thesis). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/16295

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kramer, Samantha. “Neural responses demonstrate the dynamicity of speech perception.” 2014. Masters Thesis, McMaster University. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/16295.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kramer, Samantha. “Neural responses demonstrate the dynamicity of speech perception.” 2014. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Kramer S. Neural responses demonstrate the dynamicity of speech perception. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. McMaster University; 2014. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/16295.

Council of Science Editors:

Kramer S. Neural responses demonstrate the dynamicity of speech perception. [Masters Thesis]. McMaster University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/16295


Washington University in St. Louis

16. Feld, Julia. Sizing up the competition: Quantifying the influence of the mental lexicon on auditory, visual, and audiovisual spoken word recognition.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2010, Washington University in St. Louis

 A central question in research on spoken word recognition is whether spoken words are recognized relationally, in the context of other words in the mental… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Psychology, Experimental; lipreading, neighborhood activation model, spoken word recognition

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APA (6th Edition):

Feld, J. (2010). Sizing up the competition: Quantifying the influence of the mental lexicon on auditory, visual, and audiovisual spoken word recognition. (Doctoral Dissertation). Washington University in St. Louis. Retrieved from https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/etd/106

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Feld, Julia. “Sizing up the competition: Quantifying the influence of the mental lexicon on auditory, visual, and audiovisual spoken word recognition.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Washington University in St. Louis. Accessed October 26, 2020. https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/etd/106.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Feld, Julia. “Sizing up the competition: Quantifying the influence of the mental lexicon on auditory, visual, and audiovisual spoken word recognition.” 2010. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Feld J. Sizing up the competition: Quantifying the influence of the mental lexicon on auditory, visual, and audiovisual spoken word recognition. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Washington University in St. Louis; 2010. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/etd/106.

Council of Science Editors:

Feld J. Sizing up the competition: Quantifying the influence of the mental lexicon on auditory, visual, and audiovisual spoken word recognition. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Washington University in St. Louis; 2010. Available from: https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/etd/106


University of Southern California

17. Li, David Cheng-Huan. Investigating the production and perception of reduced speech: a cross-linguistic look at articulatory coproduction and compensation for coarticulation.

Degree: PhD, Linguistics, 2014, University of Southern California

 The pronunciation of a word in continuous speech is often reduced, different from when it is spoken in isolation. Speech reduction reflects a fundamental property… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: speech production; speech perception; spoken word recognition; articulatory coproduction; compensation for coarticulation; eye‐tracking; electromagnetic articulography

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APA (6th Edition):

Li, D. C. (2014). Investigating the production and perception of reduced speech: a cross-linguistic look at articulatory coproduction and compensation for coarticulation. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/465888/rec/3635

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Li, David Cheng-Huan. “Investigating the production and perception of reduced speech: a cross-linguistic look at articulatory coproduction and compensation for coarticulation.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/465888/rec/3635.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Li, David Cheng-Huan. “Investigating the production and perception of reduced speech: a cross-linguistic look at articulatory coproduction and compensation for coarticulation.” 2014. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Li DC. Investigating the production and perception of reduced speech: a cross-linguistic look at articulatory coproduction and compensation for coarticulation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2014. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/465888/rec/3635.

Council of Science Editors:

Li DC. Investigating the production and perception of reduced speech: a cross-linguistic look at articulatory coproduction and compensation for coarticulation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2014. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/465888/rec/3635


The Ohio State University

18. Tracy, Erik Charles. Phonological mismatches: how does the position and degree of the mismatch affect spoken word recognition?.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2006, The Ohio State University

 The word recognition system is a remarkably robust system. Given this robustness, how tolerant is the system of noise within the speech signal, such as… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Psychology, Cognitive; Spoken Word Recognition; Phonological Mismatches

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APA (6th Edition):

Tracy, E. C. (2006). Phonological mismatches: how does the position and degree of the mismatch affect spoken word recognition?. (Doctoral Dissertation). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1158251870

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tracy, Erik Charles. “Phonological mismatches: how does the position and degree of the mismatch affect spoken word recognition?.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, The Ohio State University. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1158251870.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tracy, Erik Charles. “Phonological mismatches: how does the position and degree of the mismatch affect spoken word recognition?.” 2006. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Tracy EC. Phonological mismatches: how does the position and degree of the mismatch affect spoken word recognition?. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2006. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1158251870.

Council of Science Editors:

Tracy EC. Phonological mismatches: how does the position and degree of the mismatch affect spoken word recognition?. [Doctoral Dissertation]. The Ohio State University; 2006. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1158251870


Cleveland State University

19. Bell, Erin K. Investigating the Electrophysiology of Long-Term Priming in Spoken Word Recognition.

Degree: MAin Psychology, College of Sciences and Health Professions, 2018, Cleveland State University

 When participants are listening to the same words spoken by different talkers, two types of priming are possible: repetition priming and talker-specific priming. Repetition priming… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cognitive Psychology; Experimental Psychology; Psychology; long-term priming, spoken word recognition, event-related potentials, time-course hypothesis

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APA (6th Edition):

Bell, E. K. (2018). Investigating the Electrophysiology of Long-Term Priming in Spoken Word Recognition. (Masters Thesis). Cleveland State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu1527626961604402

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bell, Erin K. “Investigating the Electrophysiology of Long-Term Priming in Spoken Word Recognition.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Cleveland State University. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu1527626961604402.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bell, Erin K. “Investigating the Electrophysiology of Long-Term Priming in Spoken Word Recognition.” 2018. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Bell EK. Investigating the Electrophysiology of Long-Term Priming in Spoken Word Recognition. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Cleveland State University; 2018. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu1527626961604402.

Council of Science Editors:

Bell EK. Investigating the Electrophysiology of Long-Term Priming in Spoken Word Recognition. [Masters Thesis]. Cleveland State University; 2018. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu1527626961604402


Cleveland State University

20. Newell, Jessica L. EXAMINING WHETHER SOCIAL FACTORS AFFECT LISTENERS’ SENSITIVITY TO TALKER-SPECIFIC INFORMATION DURING THEIR ONLINE PERCEPTION OF SPOKEN WORDS.

Degree: MAin Psychology, College of Sciences and Health Professions, 2011, Cleveland State University

 McLennan and Luce (2005) found no significant cost associated with changing which talker produced a particular word from the first block of trials to the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cognitive Psychology; Social Psychology; Lexical Decision Making; Spoken Word Recognition; Talker Effects; Social Psychology; Cognitive Psychology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Newell, J. L. (2011). EXAMINING WHETHER SOCIAL FACTORS AFFECT LISTENERS’ SENSITIVITY TO TALKER-SPECIFIC INFORMATION DURING THEIR ONLINE PERCEPTION OF SPOKEN WORDS. (Masters Thesis). Cleveland State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu1304982881

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Newell, Jessica L. “EXAMINING WHETHER SOCIAL FACTORS AFFECT LISTENERS’ SENSITIVITY TO TALKER-SPECIFIC INFORMATION DURING THEIR ONLINE PERCEPTION OF SPOKEN WORDS.” 2011. Masters Thesis, Cleveland State University. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu1304982881.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Newell, Jessica L. “EXAMINING WHETHER SOCIAL FACTORS AFFECT LISTENERS’ SENSITIVITY TO TALKER-SPECIFIC INFORMATION DURING THEIR ONLINE PERCEPTION OF SPOKEN WORDS.” 2011. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Newell JL. EXAMINING WHETHER SOCIAL FACTORS AFFECT LISTENERS’ SENSITIVITY TO TALKER-SPECIFIC INFORMATION DURING THEIR ONLINE PERCEPTION OF SPOKEN WORDS. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Cleveland State University; 2011. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu1304982881.

Council of Science Editors:

Newell JL. EXAMINING WHETHER SOCIAL FACTORS AFFECT LISTENERS’ SENSITIVITY TO TALKER-SPECIFIC INFORMATION DURING THEIR ONLINE PERCEPTION OF SPOKEN WORDS. [Masters Thesis]. Cleveland State University; 2011. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu1304982881

21. Rato, João Pedro Cordeiro. Conversação homem-máquina. Caracterização e avaliação do estado actual das soluções de speech recognition, speech synthesis e sistemas de conversação homem-máquina.

Degree: 2016, Instituto Politécnico de Leiria

 A comunicação verbal humana é realizada em dois sentidos, existindo uma compreensão de ambas as partes que resulta em determinadas considerações. Este tipo de comunicação,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Speech recognition; Text to speech; Automatic speech recognition; Spoken dialogue systems; Conversação homem-máquin; Word error rate; Domínio/Área Científica::Engenharia e Tecnologia::Engenharia Eletrotécnica, Eletrónica e Informática

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APA (6th Edition):

Rato, J. P. C. (2016). Conversação homem-máquina. Caracterização e avaliação do estado actual das soluções de speech recognition, speech synthesis e sistemas de conversação homem-máquina. (Thesis). Instituto Politécnico de Leiria. Retrieved from http://www.rcaap.pt/detail.jsp?id=oai:iconline.ipleiria.pt:10400.8/2375

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rato, João Pedro Cordeiro. “Conversação homem-máquina. Caracterização e avaliação do estado actual das soluções de speech recognition, speech synthesis e sistemas de conversação homem-máquina.” 2016. Thesis, Instituto Politécnico de Leiria. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://www.rcaap.pt/detail.jsp?id=oai:iconline.ipleiria.pt:10400.8/2375.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rato, João Pedro Cordeiro. “Conversação homem-máquina. Caracterização e avaliação do estado actual das soluções de speech recognition, speech synthesis e sistemas de conversação homem-máquina.” 2016. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Rato JPC. Conversação homem-máquina. Caracterização e avaliação do estado actual das soluções de speech recognition, speech synthesis e sistemas de conversação homem-máquina. [Internet] [Thesis]. Instituto Politécnico de Leiria; 2016. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://www.rcaap.pt/detail.jsp?id=oai:iconline.ipleiria.pt:10400.8/2375.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Rato JPC. Conversação homem-máquina. Caracterização e avaliação do estado actual das soluções de speech recognition, speech synthesis e sistemas de conversação homem-máquina. [Thesis]. Instituto Politécnico de Leiria; 2016. Available from: http://www.rcaap.pt/detail.jsp?id=oai:iconline.ipleiria.pt:10400.8/2375

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


McMaster University

22. Arbour, Jessica. The Dynamic Role of Subphonemic Cues in Speech Perception: Investigating Coarticulatory Processing Across Sound Classes.

Degree: MSc, 2012, McMaster University

Neural responses to anticipatory coarticulatory cues were investigated across systematically varying phonological conditions. Congruent or incongruent subphonemic information was placed between an initial consonant… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Spoken Word Recognition; Event-Related Potentials (ERP); Subphonemic Coarticulation; Cognition and Perception; Linguistics; Phonetics and Phonology; Psycholinguistics and Neurolinguistics; Cognition and Perception

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APA (6th Edition):

Arbour, J. (2012). The Dynamic Role of Subphonemic Cues in Speech Perception: Investigating Coarticulatory Processing Across Sound Classes. (Masters Thesis). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/12635

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Arbour, Jessica. “The Dynamic Role of Subphonemic Cues in Speech Perception: Investigating Coarticulatory Processing Across Sound Classes.” 2012. Masters Thesis, McMaster University. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/12635.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Arbour, Jessica. “The Dynamic Role of Subphonemic Cues in Speech Perception: Investigating Coarticulatory Processing Across Sound Classes.” 2012. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Arbour J. The Dynamic Role of Subphonemic Cues in Speech Perception: Investigating Coarticulatory Processing Across Sound Classes. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. McMaster University; 2012. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/12635.

Council of Science Editors:

Arbour J. The Dynamic Role of Subphonemic Cues in Speech Perception: Investigating Coarticulatory Processing Across Sound Classes. [Masters Thesis]. McMaster University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/12635


McMaster University

23. Ho, Amanda. Electrophysiological evidence for the integral nature of tone in Mandarin spoken word recognition.

Degree: MSc, 2015, McMaster University

Current models of spoken word recognition have been predominantly based on studies of Indo-European languages. As a result, little is known about the recognition processes… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: N400; PMN; P200; EEG; ERP; Mandarin; Chinese; tonal language; phonological mapping negativity; electroencephalography; event-related potentials; spoken word recognition; semantic access; speech perception

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APA (6th Edition):

Ho, A. (2015). Electrophysiological evidence for the integral nature of tone in Mandarin spoken word recognition. (Masters Thesis). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/18281

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ho, Amanda. “Electrophysiological evidence for the integral nature of tone in Mandarin spoken word recognition.” 2015. Masters Thesis, McMaster University. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/18281.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ho, Amanda. “Electrophysiological evidence for the integral nature of tone in Mandarin spoken word recognition.” 2015. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Ho A. Electrophysiological evidence for the integral nature of tone in Mandarin spoken word recognition. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. McMaster University; 2015. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/18281.

Council of Science Editors:

Ho A. Electrophysiological evidence for the integral nature of tone in Mandarin spoken word recognition. [Masters Thesis]. McMaster University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/18281

24. Simmons, Elizabeth Schoen. The Timecourse of Phonological Competition in Spoken Word Recognition: A Comparison of Adults and Very Young Children.

Degree: MS, Psychological Sciences, 2017, University of Connecticut

Spoken word recognition (SWR) is the mapping of speech sounds to words from many potential candidates in one’s lexicon. In adults, words that are… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: eyetracking; spoken word recognition; children; development; language comprehension; language development

…vii Abstract Spoken word recognition (SWR) is the mapping of speech sounds to… …models of adult spoken word recognition (SWR) highlight the importance of temporal… …recognition. PHONOLOGICAL COMPETITION IN YOUNG CHILDREN 2 Timecourse of Adult Spoken Word… …Recognition Given the temporal nature of the speech signal, models of spoken word perception suggest… …two primary factors that govern competition in adult spoken word recognition: overall… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Simmons, E. S. (2017). The Timecourse of Phonological Competition in Spoken Word Recognition: A Comparison of Adults and Very Young Children. (Masters Thesis). University of Connecticut. Retrieved from https://opencommons.uconn.edu/gs_theses/1156

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Simmons, Elizabeth Schoen. “The Timecourse of Phonological Competition in Spoken Word Recognition: A Comparison of Adults and Very Young Children.” 2017. Masters Thesis, University of Connecticut. Accessed October 26, 2020. https://opencommons.uconn.edu/gs_theses/1156.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Simmons, Elizabeth Schoen. “The Timecourse of Phonological Competition in Spoken Word Recognition: A Comparison of Adults and Very Young Children.” 2017. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Simmons ES. The Timecourse of Phonological Competition in Spoken Word Recognition: A Comparison of Adults and Very Young Children. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Connecticut; 2017. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: https://opencommons.uconn.edu/gs_theses/1156.

Council of Science Editors:

Simmons ES. The Timecourse of Phonological Competition in Spoken Word Recognition: A Comparison of Adults and Very Young Children. [Masters Thesis]. University of Connecticut; 2017. Available from: https://opencommons.uconn.edu/gs_theses/1156


University of Kansas

25. Chan, Kit Ying. The Influence of the Clustering Coefficient on Spoken Word Recognition.

Degree: MA, Psychology, 2007, University of Kansas

 The clustering coefficient refers to the proportion of phonological neighbors of a target word that are also neighbors of each other. The influence of the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cognitive psychology; Experimental psychology; Spoken word recognition; Clustering coefficient; Phonological neighbors

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APA (6th Edition):

Chan, K. Y. (2007). The Influence of the Clustering Coefficient on Spoken Word Recognition. (Masters Thesis). University of Kansas. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1808/3963

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chan, Kit Ying. “The Influence of the Clustering Coefficient on Spoken Word Recognition.” 2007. Masters Thesis, University of Kansas. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1808/3963.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chan, Kit Ying. “The Influence of the Clustering Coefficient on Spoken Word Recognition.” 2007. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Chan KY. The Influence of the Clustering Coefficient on Spoken Word Recognition. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Kansas; 2007. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/3963.

Council of Science Editors:

Chan KY. The Influence of the Clustering Coefficient on Spoken Word Recognition. [Masters Thesis]. University of Kansas; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1808/3963


Universiteit Utrecht

26. Janse, E. Production and Perception of Fast Speech.

Degree: 2003, Universiteit Utrecht

 This thesis reports on a series of experiments investigating how speakers produce and listeners perceive fast speech. The main research question is how the perception… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Letteren; phonetics; word processing; fast speech; prosody; intelligibility; spoken-word recognition; speech perception; time-compressed speech; time compression; speech technology

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APA (6th Edition):

Janse, E. (2003). Production and Perception of Fast Speech. (Doctoral Dissertation). Universiteit Utrecht. Retrieved from http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/618

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Janse, E. “Production and Perception of Fast Speech.” 2003. Doctoral Dissertation, Universiteit Utrecht. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/618.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Janse, E. “Production and Perception of Fast Speech.” 2003. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Janse E. Production and Perception of Fast Speech. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Universiteit Utrecht; 2003. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/618.

Council of Science Editors:

Janse E. Production and Perception of Fast Speech. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Universiteit Utrecht; 2003. Available from: http://dspace.library.uu.nl:8080/handle/1874/618

27. Fleurion, Delphine. Etude des mécanismes d'encodage, de mémorisation et d'apprentissage lexical chez les enfants présentant des troubles développementaux du langage oral via le paradigme du monde visuel : Study of encoding, memorization and lexical learning processes in children suffering from specific language impairment through visual world paradigm.

Degree: Docteur es, Psychologie, 2017, Lille 3

Chez les enfants souffrant de troubles spécifiques du langage oral (TSLO), des déficits demémoire à court terme verbale et d’acquisition lexicale sont fréquemment décrits. Ces… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Troubles spécifiques du langage oral; Mémoire à court terme; Apprentissage de mots; Paradigme du monde visuel; Reconnaissance de mots parlés; Paradigme d’appariement rapide; Specific language impairment; Verbal short term memory; Word learning; Visual world paradigm; Spoken word recognition; Fast mapping paradigm

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APA (6th Edition):

Fleurion, D. (2017). Etude des mécanismes d'encodage, de mémorisation et d'apprentissage lexical chez les enfants présentant des troubles développementaux du langage oral via le paradigme du monde visuel : Study of encoding, memorization and lexical learning processes in children suffering from specific language impairment through visual world paradigm. (Doctoral Dissertation). Lille 3. Retrieved from http://www.theses.fr/2017LIL30026

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fleurion, Delphine. “Etude des mécanismes d'encodage, de mémorisation et d'apprentissage lexical chez les enfants présentant des troubles développementaux du langage oral via le paradigme du monde visuel : Study of encoding, memorization and lexical learning processes in children suffering from specific language impairment through visual world paradigm.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Lille 3. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://www.theses.fr/2017LIL30026.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fleurion, Delphine. “Etude des mécanismes d'encodage, de mémorisation et d'apprentissage lexical chez les enfants présentant des troubles développementaux du langage oral via le paradigme du monde visuel : Study of encoding, memorization and lexical learning processes in children suffering from specific language impairment through visual world paradigm.” 2017. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Fleurion D. Etude des mécanismes d'encodage, de mémorisation et d'apprentissage lexical chez les enfants présentant des troubles développementaux du langage oral via le paradigme du monde visuel : Study of encoding, memorization and lexical learning processes in children suffering from specific language impairment through visual world paradigm. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Lille 3; 2017. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://www.theses.fr/2017LIL30026.

Council of Science Editors:

Fleurion D. Etude des mécanismes d'encodage, de mémorisation et d'apprentissage lexical chez les enfants présentant des troubles développementaux du langage oral via le paradigme du monde visuel : Study of encoding, memorization and lexical learning processes in children suffering from specific language impairment through visual world paradigm. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Lille 3; 2017. Available from: http://www.theses.fr/2017LIL30026

28. Janse, E. Production and Perception of Fast Speech.

Degree: 2003, University Utrecht

 This thesis reports on a series of experiments investigating how speakers produce and listeners perceive fast speech. The main research question is how the perception… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: phonetics; word processing; fast speech; prosody; intelligibility; spoken-word recognition; speech perception; time-compressed speech; time compression; speech technology

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APA (6th Edition):

Janse, E. (2003). Production and Perception of Fast Speech. (Doctoral Dissertation). University Utrecht. Retrieved from https://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/618 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-618 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-618 ; https://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/618

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Janse, E. “Production and Perception of Fast Speech.” 2003. Doctoral Dissertation, University Utrecht. Accessed October 26, 2020. https://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/618 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-618 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-618 ; https://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/618.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Janse, E. “Production and Perception of Fast Speech.” 2003. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Janse E. Production and Perception of Fast Speech. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University Utrecht; 2003. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: https://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/618 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-618 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-618 ; https://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/618.

Council of Science Editors:

Janse E. Production and Perception of Fast Speech. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University Utrecht; 2003. Available from: https://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/618 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-618 ; URN:NBN:NL:UI:10-1874-618 ; https://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/618


University of Michigan

29. Zeidler, Lillian Chen. Top-Down Effects on Multiple Meaning Access within and between Languages.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2008, University of Michigan

 This research investigates context effects on multiple meaning access during word recognition. Previous monolingual word recognition research suggests that multiple meanings of homographs are temporarily… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Spoken Word Recognition; Eye Movements; Lexical Processing; Bilingualism; Lexical Ambiguity Resolution; Psychology; Social Sciences

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zeidler, L. C. (2008). Top-Down Effects on Multiple Meaning Access within and between Languages. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/61551

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zeidler, Lillian Chen. “Top-Down Effects on Multiple Meaning Access within and between Languages.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/61551.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zeidler, Lillian Chen. “Top-Down Effects on Multiple Meaning Access within and between Languages.” 2008. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Zeidler LC. Top-Down Effects on Multiple Meaning Access within and between Languages. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2008. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/61551.

Council of Science Editors:

Zeidler LC. Top-Down Effects on Multiple Meaning Access within and between Languages. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/61551


University of Michigan

30. Chen, Lillian. Top -down effects on multiple meaning access within and between languages.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2008, University of Michigan

 This research investigates context effects on multiple meaning access during word recognition. Previous monolingual word recognition research suggests that multiple meanings of homographs are temporarily… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Access; Bilingual; Context Effects; Down; Eye Movements; Eyetracking During Listening; Languages; Lexical Processing; Meaning; Multiple; Spoken Word Recognition; Top

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chen, L. (2008). Top -down effects on multiple meaning access within and between languages. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/127093

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chen, Lillian. “Top -down effects on multiple meaning access within and between languages.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Michigan. Accessed October 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/127093.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chen, Lillian. “Top -down effects on multiple meaning access within and between languages.” 2008. Web. 26 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Chen L. Top -down effects on multiple meaning access within and between languages. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2008. [cited 2020 Oct 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/127093.

Council of Science Editors:

Chen L. Top -down effects on multiple meaning access within and between languages. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Michigan; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/127093

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