Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for subject:(Social Extremes). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Victoria

1. Abeysirigunawardena, Dilumie Saumedaka. Climate variability and change impacts on coastal environmental variables in British Columbia, Canada.

Degree: Dept. of Geography, 2010, University of Victoria

The research presented in this dissertation attempted to determine whether climate variability is critical to sea level changes in coastal BC. To that end, a number of statistical models were proposed to clarify the relationships between five climate variability indices representing large-scale atmospheric circulation regimes and sea levels, storm surges, extreme winds and storm track variability in coastal BC. The research findings demonstrate that decadal to inter decadal climatic variability is fundamental to explaining the changing frequency and intensity of extreme atmospheric and oceanic environmental variables in coastal BC. The trends revealed by these analyses suggest that coastal flooding risks are certain to increase in this region during the next few decades, especially if the global sea-levels continue to rise as predicted. The out come of this study emphasis the need to look beyond climatic means when completing climate impact assessments, by clearly showing that climate extremes are currently causing the majority of weather-related damage along coastal BC. The findings highlight the need to derive knowledge on climate variability and change effects relevant at regional to local scales to enable useful adaptation strategies. The major findings of this research resulted in five independent manuscripts: (i) Sea level responses to climatic variability and change in Northern BC. The Manuscript (MC) is published in the Journal of atmospheric and oceans (AO 46 (3), 277-296); (ii) Extreme sea-level recurrences in the south coast of BC with climate considerations. This MC is in review with the Asia Pacific Journal of Climate Change (APJCC); (iii) Extreme sea-surge responses to climate variability in coastal BC. This MC is currently in review in the Annals of the AAG (AN-2009-0098); (iv) Extreme wind regime responses to climate variability and change in the inner-south-coast of BC. This MC is published in the Journal of Atmosphere and Oceans (AO 47 (1), 41-62); (v) Sensitivity of winter storm track characteristics in North-eastern Pacific to climate variability. This manuscript is in review with the Journal of Atmosphere and Oceans (AO (1113)). The findings of this research program made key contributions to the following regional sea level rise impact assessment studies in BC: (i) An examination of the Factors Affecting Relative and Absolute Sea level in coastal BC (Thomson et al., 2008). (ii) Coastal vulnerability to climate change and sea level rise, Northeast Graham Island, Haida Gwaii (formally known as the Queen Charlotte Islands), BC (Walker et al., 2007). (iii) Storm Surge: Atmospheric Hazards, Canadian Atmospheric Hazards Network - Pacific and Yukon Region, C/O Bill Taylor. Advisors/Committee Members: Smith, Daniel J. (supervisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Climate variability; Climatic changes; Coastal environmental variables; Extreme value analysis; Extremes; Sea levels; Winds; Storm surges; Storm tracks; UVic Subject Index::Humanities and Social Sciences::Social Sciences::Geography

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Abeysirigunawardena, D. S. (2010). Climate variability and change impacts on coastal environmental variables in British Columbia, Canada. (Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1828/2664

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Abeysirigunawardena, Dilumie Saumedaka. “Climate variability and change impacts on coastal environmental variables in British Columbia, Canada.” 2010. Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed November 12, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1828/2664.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Abeysirigunawardena, Dilumie Saumedaka. “Climate variability and change impacts on coastal environmental variables in British Columbia, Canada.” 2010. Web. 12 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Abeysirigunawardena DS. Climate variability and change impacts on coastal environmental variables in British Columbia, Canada. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2010. [cited 2019 Nov 12]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/2664.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Abeysirigunawardena DS. Climate variability and change impacts on coastal environmental variables in British Columbia, Canada. [Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/2664

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


RMIT University

2. Banney, M. Anecdotal evidence.

Degree: 2017, RMIT University

This research investigates an anecdotal approach to architecture. Simply put, an anecdote is a short story, interesting in nature. I have realised that through being receptive to such stories, reframing stories, recalling past anecdotes or inventing new ones, I am able to find an impetus for architecture. How does this work in projects in practice? In the first instance to come into a project in a state of ‘not knowing’, so as to be receptive to what it has to say. For this to occur successfully, positioning is critical – posturing to become privy to things of interest that could come from anywhere. It results in the gradual build-up of anecdotes – to the point that they yield a kind of meta-anecdote – the most interesting short story of them all, and one that beautifully draws the others together, and offers a glimmer of architecture. This approach is latent in my personal history, way of working and body of work. Through this PhD it has been revealed and made conscious, realising a discernible shift in practice. It has been the basis of this dissertation and the presentation and exhibition, all of which are considered projects in their own right. It has been put to me that in my work I use – anecdote as a decision making armature, beyond the normalcy of decision making. Since working more explicitly in this way, I have noticed the emergence of three kinds of anecdotes. One is the use of anecdotes from the archive, another is real time anecdotes, and the third is the notion of the speculative anecdote. I do not have a preference for one over the others, and in fact, I have noticed that projects are often a mix of all three. There is also no preference for the type of meta-anecdote, and nor is it contingent on the types of anecdotes that facilitated it. Anecdotes from the archive are those brought back from memory, that have particular relevance to a project situation. Real time anecdotes are those that emerge from/about the project situation itself. They may be direct transcriptions, or the editorial of an ordinary story to render it with interest. Speculative anecdotes are those that extrapolate from a known or tangible position, actualities re-cast to give impetus to a future possibility. I have come to realise the cut through of anecdotes. The way that committing to anecdote an occurrence, can make it an occasion, committing to anecdote the inanimate can make it animate, committing to anecdote the ordinary can make it extraordinary………... Importantly, these are not generally anecdotes about architecture, they are anecdotes about anything except architecture – but they offer a glimmer of architecture – and then they become architecture. From this, I now have faith in submission – submitting myself both to the project situation in which I find myself, and to the process I have described. I realise that when things are not clarifying, it’s usually because I need to…

Subjects/Keywords: Fields of Research; Anecdote; Anecdotal; Evidence; Deferential; Both/and; Neither/nor; Specificity; Surprise; Architecture; Interesting; Ideas; Stories; Meta-anecdote; Situation; Occasion; Occurrence; Submission; Legal; Conviction; Conversations; Relationships; Idiosyncratic; Mainstream; Other-ness; Transfiguration; Ordinary; Technical; Pragmatic; Poetic; Fringe; Magic; Drawing; Non-architectural; Camouflage; Disappear; Material; Counter-intuitive; Why; Paradox; Identity; Commercial vernacular; Perception; Greed; Undesignable; Predictable; Choreography; Animate; Inanimate; Culture; Brisbane; Self-consciousness; Memories; Value; Precious; Physical; Humour; Joke; Punchline; Metaphor; Utility; Transform; Prejudice; Potential; Cryptic; Normalcy; Kaleidoscopic; Minimum; Non-physical; Cliché; Actualities; Revelation; Noun; Verb; Analogy; Tea; Narrative; Ethics; Fiction; DIY; Gift; Mystery; Latency; Emergence; Crime scene; Aliens; Confluence; Uneven stevens; Operative effect; Carrots; Shih-tzu; Objective; Subjective; Doubt; Circumstantial; Improbable; Not-knowing; Extraordinary; Detective; Phonetics; Adjective; Tactical; Irony; Barrister; Reframing; Inventing; Speculating; Research; Optimistic; Optimism; Provincial; Ceremony; Incomplete; Bi-product; Practice; Mirrors; Re-definition; Stigma; Upside-down; Art; Accepting; TV; Developer; Discipline; Cheap; Fascinate; Standard; Structure; Branding; Social Extremes; Feeling; Curator; Cartoon; Soiree; Probative

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Banney, M. (2017). Anecdotal evidence. (Thesis). RMIT University. Retrieved from http://researchbank.rmit.edu.au/view/rmit:162277

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Banney, M. “Anecdotal evidence.” 2017. Thesis, RMIT University. Accessed November 12, 2019. http://researchbank.rmit.edu.au/view/rmit:162277.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Banney, M. “Anecdotal evidence.” 2017. Web. 12 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Banney M. Anecdotal evidence. [Internet] [Thesis]. RMIT University; 2017. [cited 2019 Nov 12]. Available from: http://researchbank.rmit.edu.au/view/rmit:162277.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Banney M. Anecdotal evidence. [Thesis]. RMIT University; 2017. Available from: http://researchbank.rmit.edu.au/view/rmit:162277

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.