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You searched for subject:(Smolder). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Edinburgh

1. Pironi, Paolo. Smouldering combustion of organic liquids in porous media for remediating NAPL-contaminated soils.

Degree: PhD, 2010, University of Edinburgh

This research investigated the potential of smouldering combustion to be employed as a remediation approach for soil contaminated by non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Small-scale (~15 cm), proof-of-concept experiments were the first to demonstrate that organic liquids embedded within an inert soil matrix can be successfully smouldered. Intermediate-scale (~30 cm) column experiments examined in detail the behaviour of the combustion process including its relationship to mass and energy balance and the evolution of temperature profiles. In addition, detailed evaluations of environmental parameters (e.g., soil concentrations, gas emissions) were conducted. For the first time, it was demonstrated that NAPL smouldering combustion can be self-sustaining (i.e., propagation of the smouldering front after termination of the igniter) and self-terminating (i.e., natural extinction of the reaction after all of the NAPL is destroyed). More than 30 column sensitivity experiments quantified the broad range of process parameters - including contaminant type, contaminant mass, soil type, and oxidizer flow rates - within which the process was self-sustaining and essentially complete remediation was achieved (i.e. contaminant mass removal in excess of 99.5%). Maximum burning temperatures were observed in the range 600-1100 C. Average propagation velocities varied between 0.7e-4 and 1.2e-4 m/s. Intensity and velocity of the process were shown to be controlled by the rate at which oxidizer is delivered. Contaminant type and mass was observed to affect peak temperatures and propagation velocity by influencing the energy balance at the reaction front. Moreover, mass and energy balance models were demonstrated to provide reasonable predictions of the observed propagation velocities. Overall, this research introduced an entirely new approach to the remediation of NAPL-contaminated soils and, further, advanced the understanding of the mechanisms that control the underlying process of smouldering combustion of liquids.

Subjects/Keywords: 577.27; smolder; coal tar; oil; enviroment

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pironi, P. (2010). Smouldering combustion of organic liquids in porous media for remediating NAPL-contaminated soils. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Edinburgh. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1842/3222

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pironi, Paolo. “Smouldering combustion of organic liquids in porous media for remediating NAPL-contaminated soils.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Edinburgh. Accessed April 14, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1842/3222.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pironi, Paolo. “Smouldering combustion of organic liquids in porous media for remediating NAPL-contaminated soils.” 2010. Web. 14 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Pironi P. Smouldering combustion of organic liquids in porous media for remediating NAPL-contaminated soils. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Edinburgh; 2010. [cited 2021 Apr 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/3222.

Council of Science Editors:

Pironi P. Smouldering combustion of organic liquids in porous media for remediating NAPL-contaminated soils. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Edinburgh; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1842/3222

2. Lo, Chen Chia. Characteristics of smoldering combustion of sawdust.

Degree: MSin Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, 2013, University of Texas – Austin

This report is a study on the smoldering combustion of natural sawdust from untreated woods. The objective was to develop and test an experimental technique to study the fundamental behavior of sawdust smolder. The experimental setup was an annulus cookstove packed with sawdust between the inner and outer radii creating a central hollow core. The sawdust was ignited by a heating coil wrapped around the inner radius. Thermocouples were embedded in the sawdust bed fanning out in the radial direction, and temperature was recorded throughout the smolder process. Consistent with the literature, the experimental results indicate that wood smolder consists of three pathways, 1) sawdust to char, 2) sawdust to volatiles, and 3) char to ash. Pathways 1 and 3 can be clearly characterized by the temperature profile of the smolder; however, pathway 2 often involves flaming of the sawdust and is beyond the scope of this study. Pathway 1, sawdust to char, is an endothermic reaction that results in a clearly defined char front that propagates across the sawdust bed in the radial direction. As smolder proceeds, the char continues to oxidize and breaks down into non-volatile products such as water vapor and carbon dioxide (CO₂) in further exothermic reactions. Pathway 2, char to ash, is an exothermic reaction that can lead to glowing combustion when exposed to sufficient amounts of oxygen and results in spikes in temperature. In contrast to the clearly defined char front, the ashing zone traces cracks in the sawdust where air can penetrate through, and has no discernible front. Section 1 discusses the motivation behind the study of sawdust cookstoves in third world countries, in particular Ghana, to replace wood with sawdust as a cheap alternative for household fuel. Section 2 details the experimental setup of the cookstove rig and the methodology of the experiments conducted. Section 3 reports the results of the experiments and analyzes the temperature profiles in relation to the three types of chemical reactions as noted above. Section 4 concludes with a summary of the results and discusses efforts in measuring emissions from the smolder and future work to be done. Advisors/Committee Members: Ellzey, Janet L. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Sawdust; Smolder; Smoldering combustion; Biomass; Ghana; Cookstove; Char oxidation; Ash

…13 Figure 3-5: Temperature profile of the base case smolder burn… …Figure 3-7: Webcam captures of the sawdust smolder process ...........................17 Figure… …19 Figure 3-10: Base case smolder… …lead to a transition from smoldering to flaming combustion. Char smolder is extremely… …thus closely examine the temperature profile of the sawdust smolder to identify the reaction… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lo, C. C. (2013). Characteristics of smoldering combustion of sawdust. (Masters Thesis). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/22661

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lo, Chen Chia. “Characteristics of smoldering combustion of sawdust.” 2013. Masters Thesis, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed April 14, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/22661.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lo, Chen Chia. “Characteristics of smoldering combustion of sawdust.” 2013. Web. 14 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Lo CC. Characteristics of smoldering combustion of sawdust. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2013. [cited 2021 Apr 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/22661.

Council of Science Editors:

Lo CC. Characteristics of smoldering combustion of sawdust. [Masters Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/22661

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