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You searched for subject:(Simultaneity judgment). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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McMaster University

1. Zhou, Yichu. The Temporal Window of Visuotactile Integration.

Degree: MSc, 2016, McMaster University

The simultaneity judgment (SJ) and temporal order judgment (TOJ) tasks are the two widely used methods for measuring the window of multisensory integration; however, there are some indications that these two tasks involve different cognitive processes and therefore produce unrelated results. The present study measured observers’ visuotactile window of integration using these two tasks in order to examine whether or not SJs and TOJs produce consistent results for this particular pairing of modalities. Experiment 1 revealed no significant correlations between the SJ and TOJ tasks, indicating that they appear to measure distinct processes in visuotactile integration, and in addition showed that both sensory and decisional factors contribute to this difference. These findings were replicated in Experiment 2, which, along with Experiment 3, also showed that the reliability of the SJ and TOJ tasks may in part be responsible for the lack of agreement between these two tasks. A secondary result concerned the point of subjective simultaneity (PSS), which were tactile-leading across all three experiments. This contradicts some of the previous literature in visuotactile integration. Manipulating the spatial distance between the visual and tactile stimulus (Experiment 2) and the certainty of stimulus location (Experiment 3) did not lead to significant changes of the location of the PSS.

Thesis

Master of Science (MSc)

Perception often involves the use of more than one sensory modality at the same time; for example, touching an object usually produces sensory signals in the visual and tactile modalities. Since the amount of time needed to transmit and process sensory signals is different among the modalities, the brain allows for a certain time difference between signals of various pairs of modalities that it will consider as coming from one event. Two tasks commonly used to measure these allowable time differences are the simultaneity judgment (SJ) and temporal order judgment (TOJ) tasks. Although they are usually used interchangeably, the present data show that the results from these tasks in the visuotactile pairing of modalities are unrelated, and a major contributing reason appears to be that these tasks are not the most reliable.

Advisors/Committee Members: Shore, David, Psychology.

Subjects/Keywords: Multisensory integration; Simultaneity judgment; Temporal order judgment

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zhou, Y. (2016). The Temporal Window of Visuotactile Integration. (Masters Thesis). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/20429

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zhou, Yichu. “The Temporal Window of Visuotactile Integration.” 2016. Masters Thesis, McMaster University. Accessed October 21, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/20429.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zhou, Yichu. “The Temporal Window of Visuotactile Integration.” 2016. Web. 21 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Zhou Y. The Temporal Window of Visuotactile Integration. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. McMaster University; 2016. [cited 2020 Oct 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/20429.

Council of Science Editors:

Zhou Y. The Temporal Window of Visuotactile Integration. [Masters Thesis]. McMaster University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/20429

2. Finkelshtein, Anna. ACTION EFFECTS ON THE PERCEPTION OF MULTISENSORY EVENTS.

Degree: PhD, 2015, McMaster University

Voluntary actions affect subsequent perception. For example, an action that precedes an auditory stimulus is perceived to have occurred later in time than is actually the case, while the auditory stimulus is perceived earlier in time. This effect is known as intentional binding. Current literature regarding action effects focuses on perception of a single sensory modality while the effects on perception of multiple modalities remain largely unknown. The present thesis explored how actions influenced the timing of perceived multisensory events. Additionally, this thesis investigated differences in voluntary compared to involuntary actions on subsequent perception. In Chapter 2, action effects on perceived onsets of visual and tactile stimuli were explored. This question was extended to other bimodal pairs, including audiovisual and audiotactile, in Chapter 3. Lastly, in Chapter 4, action effects on temporal resolution were investigated. In all the experiments, participants performed a chosen or a fixed button press that followed a bimodal temporal order judgment (TOJ) task. To investigate the influence of spatial proximity between actions and stimuli on binding, in Chapters 2 and 3, each stimulus modality appeared on different sides. In Chapter 4, the critical stimuli appeared at the same location, either close to or far from the preceding action, to explore the effect of action on temporal resolution. The present data provide evidence that actions affect the perceived onsets of multisensory events in an idiosyncratic manner, depending on the subsequent stimuli. Actions appear to preferentially bind to vision, then touch, and lastly, audition, but actions do not always bind to subsequent stimuli. Furthermore, actions degrade temporal resolution of bimodal stimuli. Lastly, the type of action, whether chosen or fixed, did not impact the degree of binding. Together, these data contribute to the action-perception literature, illustrating that our behaviours dynamically affect how we perceive the world.

Dissertation

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Advisors/Committee Members: Shore, David I., Psychology.

Subjects/Keywords: multisensory; temporal order judgment task; point of subjective simultaneity; just noticeable difference; visuotactile; audiovisual; audiotactile; perceived onset; temporal precision; cognition and perception; cognitive psychology; action

…noticeable difference PSS: point of subjective simultaneity TOJ: temporal order judgment task SOA… …judgment (TOJ) task or simultaneity judgment task, they were more likely to perceive… …77 3.2.1 Point of Subjective Simultaneity as a Measure of Processing Rates ........... 78… …an audiovisual temporal order judgment (TOJ) task for sex-matched or sex… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Finkelshtein, A. (2015). ACTION EFFECTS ON THE PERCEPTION OF MULTISENSORY EVENTS. (Doctoral Dissertation). McMaster University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11375/17748

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Finkelshtein, Anna. “ACTION EFFECTS ON THE PERCEPTION OF MULTISENSORY EVENTS.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, McMaster University. Accessed October 21, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11375/17748.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Finkelshtein, Anna. “ACTION EFFECTS ON THE PERCEPTION OF MULTISENSORY EVENTS.” 2015. Web. 21 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Finkelshtein A. ACTION EFFECTS ON THE PERCEPTION OF MULTISENSORY EVENTS. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. McMaster University; 2015. [cited 2020 Oct 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/17748.

Council of Science Editors:

Finkelshtein A. ACTION EFFECTS ON THE PERCEPTION OF MULTISENSORY EVENTS. [Doctoral Dissertation]. McMaster University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11375/17748

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