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You searched for subject:(Shipwreck legislation). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Western Australia

1. Rodrigues, Jennifer A. Finders keepers : an examination of the impact of diver interaction with shipwrecks as revealed by the 1993 amnesty collections.

Degree: PhD, 2011, University of Western Australia

[Truncated abstract] Despite the fact that much research has been carried out on private collecting behaviour and the theories that underpin this phenomenon, collecting behaviour relating to maritime or shipwreck sites including why and what divers collect has not been the focus of previous research. The culture surrounding wreck diving and souveniring in Australia prior to the enactment of the Commonwealth Historic Shipwrecks Act 1976 was such that there were no restrictions on what divers felt they could do to wrecks and what and how much material they removed. As a result, since the 1950s, most wrecks off Australia's coastline that were known to divers suffered varying degrees of impact from souveniring activities. These included the use of explosives, dredging, various tools (hack saw, crowbar, hammer and chisel) to dislodge or loosen material and the removal of complete and incomplete artefacts that were part of vessels' cargo, armament, superstructure or personal possession of those onboard. Consequently, a portion of Australia’s submerged archaeological evidence was lost into private hands, but what proportion, and what material, was unknown. In 1993, a nationwide amnesty was announced to encourage people to declare their historic shipwreck relics for documentation to enhance information of Australia's maritime heritage. This study analysed the largely unrecognised and under-utilised source of evidence from the amnesty collections, in conjunction with responses provided in a written survey sent to those who declared objects, to determine the degree of impact that collecting has had on Australian shipwrecks and to identify patterns in shipwreck collecting behaviour.

These results were then used to explore the applicability of existing theories about collecting behaviour such as the criteria applied to adding objects to collections, the different types of collecting (e.g. collecting tangible objects versus collecting of experiences, and collecting rare or mundane objects driven by different personal motivations), changes in collecting behaviour over time due to personal circumstances, and the fate of private collections since acquisition. Analyses of the amnesty data and the divers' responses show that collecting from shipwrecks has changed over time in some respects and is affected by site depth, available diving technology, distances from towns and cities, age of wreck as well as value of goods carried and other items that might be found on site. As might be expected, wrecks in metropolitan waters that were reasonably close to towns and in shallow waters were found to be frequently souvenired. However, wrecks in remote areas, and even some in very deep waters were also souvenired by a smaller but more determined group of recreational divers. Most shipwreck sites across Australia were souvenired but the early Dutch wrecks in Western Australia were heavily targeted by souvenir hunters primarily for their coins and bullion but also for the rarity of the wreck and the unique and valuable cargo…

Subjects/Keywords: Amnesty; Shipwrecks; Private collecting; Australia; Shipwreck legislation; Recreational diver impact; Early diving culture

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rodrigues, J. A. (2011). Finders keepers : an examination of the impact of diver interaction with shipwrecks as revealed by the 1993 amnesty collections. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Western Australia. Retrieved from http://repository.uwa.edu.au:80/R/?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=34975&local_base=GEN01-INS01

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rodrigues, Jennifer A. “Finders keepers : an examination of the impact of diver interaction with shipwrecks as revealed by the 1993 amnesty collections.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Western Australia. Accessed January 24, 2020. http://repository.uwa.edu.au:80/R/?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=34975&local_base=GEN01-INS01.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rodrigues, Jennifer A. “Finders keepers : an examination of the impact of diver interaction with shipwrecks as revealed by the 1993 amnesty collections.” 2011. Web. 24 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Rodrigues JA. Finders keepers : an examination of the impact of diver interaction with shipwrecks as revealed by the 1993 amnesty collections. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Western Australia; 2011. [cited 2020 Jan 24]. Available from: http://repository.uwa.edu.au:80/R/?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=34975&local_base=GEN01-INS01.

Council of Science Editors:

Rodrigues JA. Finders keepers : an examination of the impact of diver interaction with shipwrecks as revealed by the 1993 amnesty collections. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Western Australia; 2011. Available from: http://repository.uwa.edu.au:80/R/?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=34975&local_base=GEN01-INS01


Leiden University

2. Sharfman, J. Troubled Waters: developing a new approach to maritime and underwater cultural heritage in sub-Saharan Africa.

Degree: 2017, Leiden University

Maritime archaeologists, historians and heritage managers have struggled to position maritime and underwater cultural heritage (MUCH) in the sub-Saharan African heritage context. Management of MUCH resources, based on Western legal systems, has focused almost exclusively on shipwreck sites. Management strategies have been implemented to stop treasure hunting and limit the damage caused by salvage activities. The application of internationally accepted MUCH management practices has, however, failed to engage the publics of many African nations. This has meant that the application of regulatory strategies has been a challenging task which has ultimately failed to successfully manage MUCH resources or engage sub-Saharan communities. This research proposes, applies and assesses alternative management and engagement models at several southern-African case study sites, and contributes towards establishing a new approach to MUCH. The approach examines the context in which the heritage resource exists, including the socio-political and economic environments, as well as the available mechanisms in place, and available, for research and management. It considers the scope of MUCH in a regional context and seeks to establish some preliminary guidelines for management strategies built on local relevance and buy-in. Finally, it offers a management approach that is beneficial to both professional practitioners and community leaders. Advisors/Committee Members: Supervisor: Jansen M.E.R.G.N. Co-Supervisor: Parthesius R..

Subjects/Keywords: Underwater cultural heritage management Maritime archaeology; Shipwreck; Maritime cultural landscape; Community engagement; Maritime heritage; Shipwreck management; Shipwreck legislation; Underwater cultural heritage management Maritime archaeology; Shipwreck; Maritime cultural landscape; Community engagement; Maritime heritage; Shipwreck management; Shipwreck legislation

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sharfman, J. (2017). Troubled Waters: developing a new approach to maritime and underwater cultural heritage in sub-Saharan Africa. (Doctoral Dissertation). Leiden University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1887/59501

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sharfman, J. “Troubled Waters: developing a new approach to maritime and underwater cultural heritage in sub-Saharan Africa.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Leiden University. Accessed January 24, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1887/59501.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sharfman, J. “Troubled Waters: developing a new approach to maritime and underwater cultural heritage in sub-Saharan Africa.” 2017. Web. 24 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Sharfman J. Troubled Waters: developing a new approach to maritime and underwater cultural heritage in sub-Saharan Africa. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Leiden University; 2017. [cited 2020 Jan 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1887/59501.

Council of Science Editors:

Sharfman J. Troubled Waters: developing a new approach to maritime and underwater cultural heritage in sub-Saharan Africa. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Leiden University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1887/59501

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