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You searched for subject:(Shipbreaking). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Victoria University of Wellington

1. Dromgool, Edward. Living on the Edge - Defining Shipbreaking at the Edge of Globalisation in Alang, Inida.

Degree: 2016, Victoria University of Wellington

Forty thousand men on the coastline of Alang, India, dismantle a large portion of the world’s discarded ships in a process referred to as shipbreaking. The discarded vessels are dismantled piece by piece, with no more than a gas torch and physical labour in a country with little to no regulations on the rules of labour or environmental protection. Workers of the shipbreaking yards live in slum dwellings, within a toxic landscape of petroleum hydrocarbons, heavy metals, lead paint and asbestos; all are toxic by-products of globalised industrialisation. As a result of the extreme work and poor housing conditions, the impoverished inhabitants are at high risk of life threatening diseases which commonly result in death. On the shipbreaking yard alone, an average of sixteen deaths per year occur as a result of the extremely hazardous working conditions. While the need to dismantle and recycle ships will not disappear any time soon, it is imperative that current practices become safe to both workers and the environment. This thesis outlines a design project that introduces the creation of an ecosystem within the shipbreaking community of Alang by introducing many interconnected systems that allow for self-sufficiency. Inspired by concepts of bio-mimicry, the project provides the means to capture toxins safely using naturally produced materials; creates community, family based housing that replaces the current housing slums; and modernises the shipbreaking process by implementing a cyclical ecosystem that capitalises on the regions natural resources. By making the process of shipbreaking environmentally safe and creating a hazard free, more productive work environment, this project suggests that a business practice that is unwanted and hidden can be productive and economically viable. Advisors/Committee Members: Sweet, Kevin.

Subjects/Keywords: Bio-mimicry; Self-sufficiency; Architecture; Shipbreaking; Alang; India

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dromgool, E. (2016). Living on the Edge - Defining Shipbreaking at the Edge of Globalisation in Alang, Inida. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/5460

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dromgool, Edward. “Living on the Edge - Defining Shipbreaking at the Edge of Globalisation in Alang, Inida.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed June 25, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/5460.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dromgool, Edward. “Living on the Edge - Defining Shipbreaking at the Edge of Globalisation in Alang, Inida.” 2016. Web. 25 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Dromgool E. Living on the Edge - Defining Shipbreaking at the Edge of Globalisation in Alang, Inida. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2016. [cited 2019 Jun 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/5460.

Council of Science Editors:

Dromgool E. Living on the Edge - Defining Shipbreaking at the Edge of Globalisation in Alang, Inida. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/5460


Michigan Technological University

2. Mizanur Rahman, S.M. SHIPBREAKING IN BANGLADESH: PERSPECTIVES FROM INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY, POLITICAL ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY.

Degree: PhD, Department of Social Sciences, 2016, Michigan Technological University

The international shipbreaking industry connects developed and developing countries through the spatial and temporal flow of resources, both transported by the ships and by the recycling of the ships themselves. Much of the research on this industry to date focuses on a natural science perspective, particularly related to local pollution when the ships are recycled. However, many products for the public (such as documentaries and magazine articles) focus on the workers who dismantle these ships, often with minimal protection; the appalling images of shipbreaking yard workers and their polluted surrounds have garnered immense global attention and calls for better regulations. In this dissertation, I examine how these environmental and worker rights issues can be understood through multiple disciplinary perspectives – industrial ecology (and one of its commonly used tools, Life Cycle Assessment), political ecology and environmental policy. Through an industrial ecology perspective, I examine how the social embeddedness in Bangladesh influences the flow of recycled scrap metal thorough the country. My study suggests that reciprocal and trust-based business connections provide the necessary leverage to maintain the flow of scrap resources from the Chittagong ship breaking yards on the coast to the metalsmith community in Old Dhaka. In chapter two, I use Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) to assess the impacts of the shipbreaking industry on local environmental conditions and worker health. The results of the LCA pose a considerable challenge to the dominant narrative of the industry as wholly negative and unredeemable. My study suggests that shipbreaking produces much less pollution and risks to human health than a similar process using virgin ore would. My results also suggest that the rerolling operations (to produce rebar) – rather than the beached ship cutting and in-yard processing – are more environmentally damaging. Among localized concerns, gas torching poses considerable health challenges to the cuttermen in the yard. In chapter three, I investigate the drivers behind the persistent negative images of shipbreaking. This dominant narrative is maintained by Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) and their selective focus on pollution and accidents while ignoring improvements in the industry (e.g., introducing new technologies for managing the resources). My interviews with local stakeholders suggest that there are considerable image politics among the local NGOs that divert attention away from the global drivers of these impacts. Using political ecology to frame the scalar politics involved, I found that shipbreaking constitutes a simultaneous interplay of multiple scales, and that the NGOs’ insistence on a local scale solution detracts from the sorely needed policy reforms at national and global scales. The last empirical chapter identifies regulatory gaps in the international treaties and domestic regulatory regimes. In particular, a significant gap exists in international treaties regarding… Advisors/Committee Members: Audrey L. Mayer.

Subjects/Keywords: Shipbreaking industry; Industrial Ecology; Political Ecology; Life Cycle Assessment; Policy Gap Analysis; Environmental Studies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mizanur Rahman, S. M. (2016). SHIPBREAKING IN BANGLADESH: PERSPECTIVES FROM INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY, POLITICAL ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY. (Doctoral Dissertation). Michigan Technological University. Retrieved from http://digitalcommons.mtu.edu/etdr/103

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mizanur Rahman, S M. “SHIPBREAKING IN BANGLADESH: PERSPECTIVES FROM INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY, POLITICAL ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Michigan Technological University. Accessed June 25, 2019. http://digitalcommons.mtu.edu/etdr/103.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mizanur Rahman, S M. “SHIPBREAKING IN BANGLADESH: PERSPECTIVES FROM INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY, POLITICAL ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY.” 2016. Web. 25 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Mizanur Rahman SM. SHIPBREAKING IN BANGLADESH: PERSPECTIVES FROM INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY, POLITICAL ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Michigan Technological University; 2016. [cited 2019 Jun 25]. Available from: http://digitalcommons.mtu.edu/etdr/103.

Council of Science Editors:

Mizanur Rahman SM. SHIPBREAKING IN BANGLADESH: PERSPECTIVES FROM INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY, POLITICAL ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Michigan Technological University; 2016. Available from: http://digitalcommons.mtu.edu/etdr/103

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