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You searched for subject:(Sensory arousal). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Georgia State University

1. Van Rie, Ginny L. Using Sensory Interventions to Promote Skill Acquisition for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

Degree: PhD, Educational Psychology and Special Education, 2010, Georgia State University

Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have documented sensory processing difficulties across the lifespan; however there is limited empirical support for the sensory-based interventions that have become ubiquitous with the population. This study was conducted to address this need and examine the effect of sensory-based interventions on skill acquisition for five elementary-age students with ASD. Proponents suggest that sensory-based interventions can be used to facilitate optimal levels of arousal so that children are available for learning. A single-case alternating treatments design was used to evaluate functional relations between the two sensory-based antecedent interventions and correct responding on expressive identification tasks. Upon visual analysis of the graphed data, functional relations were apparent for two participants. A positive relation between one sensory activity and correct responses was evident for a third student, but his rate of skill acquisition was too slow to verify a functional relation during the study. Results were undifferentiated for two students; one reached mastery criteria with both sensory-based interventions, while one made only modest improvement in expressive identification. Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) was used to identify predictors of growth. Scrutiny of the results of the level-1 analysis revealed that there were significant differences among the participants at the start of the study (00 = 388.46, ²(4) = 45.97, p < .001) and that all of the students made significant gains during the study (10 = 2.35, t(4) = 3.43, p < .05). Using treatment as a predictor in Model 2 resulted in the finding of no significance for the sensory-based interventions in predicting growth. The two biggest level-2 predictors of student growth were age (11 = 0.055, t(2) = 6.403, p < .001) and IQ (22 = 0.21, t(2) = 13.41, p < .001). Although not clinically significant, Childhood Autism Rating Scale scores as a level-2 predictor of growth may have practical significance. Implications for mixed-modality research and applied practice are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. L. Juane Heflin, Ph.D..

Subjects/Keywords: AUtism; Sensory Interventions; Theory of Optimal Arousal; Educational Psychology; Special Education and Teaching

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Van Rie, G. L. (2010). Using Sensory Interventions to Promote Skill Acquisition for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia State University. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/epse_diss/71

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Van Rie, Ginny L. “Using Sensory Interventions to Promote Skill Acquisition for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia State University. Accessed February 23, 2020. https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/epse_diss/71.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Van Rie, Ginny L. “Using Sensory Interventions to Promote Skill Acquisition for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders.” 2010. Web. 23 Feb 2020.

Vancouver:

Van Rie GL. Using Sensory Interventions to Promote Skill Acquisition for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2010. [cited 2020 Feb 23]. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/epse_diss/71.

Council of Science Editors:

Van Rie GL. Using Sensory Interventions to Promote Skill Acquisition for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia State University; 2010. Available from: https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/epse_diss/71

2. Dupuis-Desormeaux, Nathalie. TUTTI! - Music Composition as Dialogue.

Degree: PhD, Music, 2018, York University

As an engineer, when I could not comprehend a physical phenomenon, I turned to mathematics. As a mathematician, when I could not link sciences to humanity, I turned to music. As a music composer, I no longer see things, I see others. The novel method of music composition presented herein is a first comprehensive framework, system and architectonic template relying on the ideologies of Mikhail Bakhtin's dialogism as well as on research in auditory perception and cognition to create music dialogue as a means of including and engaging participants in musical communication. Beyond immediate artistic intent, I strive to compose music that fosters inclusiveness and collaboration as a relational social gesture in hope that it might incite people and society to embrace their differences and collaborate with the 'others' around them. After probing aesthetics, communication studies and sociology, I argue that dialogism reveals itself well-suited to the aims of the current research. With dialogism as a guiding philosophy, the chapters then look at the relationship between music and language, perception as authorship, intertextuality, the interplay of imagination and understanding, means of arousal in music, mimesis, motion in music and rhythmic entrainment. Employing findings from Gestalt psychology, psychoacoustics, auditory scene analysis, cognition and psychology of expectation, the remaining chapters propose a cognitively informed polyphonic music composition method capable of reproducing the different constituents of dialogic communication by creating and organizing melodic, harmonic, rhythmic and structural elements. Music theory and principles of orchestration then move to music composition as examples demonstrate how dialogue scored between voice-parts provides opportunities for performers to interact with each other and, consequently, engage listeners experiencing the collaboration. As dialogue can be identified in various works, I postulate that the presented Dialogical Music Composition Method can also serve as a method of music analysis. This personal method of composition also supplies tools that other musicians can opt to employ when endeavouring to build balanced dialogue in music. If visibility is key to identity, then composing music that potentially enters into dialogue which each and every voice promotes 'humanity' through inclusivity, yielding a united Tutti ! Advisors/Committee Members: Coghlan, Michael (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Cognitive psychology; Music composition; Polyphonic music composition; Cognitively informed polyphonic music composition; Dialogical Music Composition Method; Dialogic music composition method; Music theory; Dialogic contrapuntal harmony; Orchestration; Melody; Harmony; Polyphony; Counterpoint; Rhythm; Form; Growth; Music architecture; Music analysis; Dialogue; Music dialogue; Dialog; Music dialog; Dialogism; Bakhtin; Reception theory; Gadamer; Kant; Hegel; Adorno; Schoenberg; Stravinsky; Hindemith; Toch; Huron; Bregman; Francès; Dialogic communication; Music communication; Musical communication; Compelling music; Inclusion; Inclusivity; Inclusiveness; Participation; Participatory music; Music as society; Music as community; Music sociology; Engaging music; Engagement; Collaboration; Balanced dialogue in music; Biophony; Niche discrimination; Krause; Communication studies; Language; Music aesthetics; Aesthetics; Philosophy of music; Musicology; Cognitive psychology; Auditory perception; Music cognition; Cognition; Psychology of perception; Reception; Music reception; Auditory streaming; Auditory scene analysis; Gestalt psychology; Authorship; Imagination; Intertextuality; Mimesis; Appropriation; Appropriative authorship; Authoring; Re-authoring; Imagination as creation; Psychoacoustics; Expectation theory; Theory of expectation; Expectation; Psychology of expectation; Tutti; Music arousal; Intellectual arousal; Emotional arousal; Sensory arousal; Entrainment; Physicality; Stability; Variety; Closure; Uniqueness; Sequential dialogue; Collaborative dialogue; Disjoint dialogue; Surprise; Drama; Dramatic structure; Structure of drama; Dramatic work; Freitag; Representation; Memory; Repetition; Experience; Anticipation; Pointing; Anchoring; Anchor; Tonality; Tonal anchor; Close neighbors; Individuality; Collectivity; Formalism; Functionalism; Subjectivity; Structuralism; Cohen; Marburg; Auditory learning; Style; Conventions; Acculturation; Semiotics; Dynamic expectation; Schematic expectation; Veridical expectation; Symmetry; Motivic repetition; Thematic repetition; Style analysis; Modulation; Modulation tools; Memory as experience; Familiarity; Redundancy; Compositional acculturation; Rimsky-Korsakov; Gevaert; Rameau; Bimodality; Bi-modality; Diatonic; Overtones; Perceptual motion; Pitch proximities; Harmonic motion; Polytonality; Polyrhythm; Contemporary music; Art-music; Western art music; Neoclassicism; Modernism; Inclusive dialogue; What makes music compelling?; Selection and Structuring of Music Parameters to Create Inclusive; Engaging and Participatory Dialogue in Music Composition; Performance; Performativity; Small; Musicking; DeNora; Include; Engage; Listener; Audience; Interpretation; Play; Interaction; Interactive; Performer; Conductor; Orchestra; Orchestral music; Instrumental music; Absolute music; Tone painting; Word painting; Singing; Empathy; Mirror neuron; Music meaning; Music expression; Hanslick; Meyer; Langer

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dupuis-Desormeaux, N. (2018). TUTTI! - Music Composition as Dialogue. (Doctoral Dissertation). York University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10315/34488

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dupuis-Desormeaux, Nathalie. “TUTTI! - Music Composition as Dialogue.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, York University. Accessed February 23, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10315/34488.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dupuis-Desormeaux, Nathalie. “TUTTI! - Music Composition as Dialogue.” 2018. Web. 23 Feb 2020.

Vancouver:

Dupuis-Desormeaux N. TUTTI! - Music Composition as Dialogue. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. York University; 2018. [cited 2020 Feb 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/34488.

Council of Science Editors:

Dupuis-Desormeaux N. TUTTI! - Music Composition as Dialogue. [Doctoral Dissertation]. York University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/34488

.