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You searched for subject:(Semiconductors Cleaning). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Georgia Tech

1. Spuller, Matthew Thomas. Resist and Residue Removal Using Gas-Expanded Liquids.

Degree: PhD, Chemical Engineering, 2003, Georgia Tech

Each new generation of integrated circuits and other nano-structured devices is produced at ever decreasing length scales. The extension of conventional liquid-phase processes for the manufacturing of these devices is uncertain. This work investigates the ability of liquids to wet nanoscale features. A model for wetting time is derived that may be used to identify those geometries for which wetting is critical. Conditions under which wetting time is significant may result in low yield and poor uniformity, and may require alternate-phase processing. Furthermore, the dependence of wetting time on the properties of the fluid are quantified so that fluids may be designed to have optimal properties and thus optimal performance for wetting. The resulting model can be used as a tool to predict future processing requirements, and when necessary, to design novel processes implementing alternative phase fluids such as gas-expanded liquids (GXLs). This study also quantitatively predicts specific effects associated with modified transport properties for dissolution and transport in nanoscale features. The use of GXLs is a particularly promising alternative to conventional liquid-phase processes. GXLs have superior mass transport properties relative to liquids, but can maintain the solvent strength necessary for IC process steps such as post-etch residue removal and photoresist stripping. In addition, the environmental benefits associated with CO2-based processes can be substantial. Conceptual demonstration of the use of carbon dioxide (CO2)-expanded liquids for photoresist and residue removal has been performed. GXLs containing up to 75% CO2 are equally as effective as the pure solvents for removal of PHOST-based films. These experiments indicate that GXLs have potential applications in photoresist stripping and post-etch residue removal, in which cost savings due to reduced solvent use can be substantial. The removal of films with GXLs has been evaluated primarily with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Additionally, an in situ optical technique has been developed for film and GXL diagnostics. This technique has been used to evaluate the response of PHOST-based thin films to GXLs and to monitor density changes of liquids upon gas expansion. Advisors/Committee Members: Dennis W. Hess (Committee Chair), Charles E. Eckert (Committee Member), Charles L. Liotta (Committee Member), Clifford L. Henderson (Committee Member), J. Carson Meredith (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Semiconductors Cleaning; Photoresist removal; Integrated circuits Cleaning; Semiconductors Cleaning

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APA (6th Edition):

Spuller, M. T. (2003). Resist and Residue Removal Using Gas-Expanded Liquids. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5272

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Spuller, Matthew Thomas. “Resist and Residue Removal Using Gas-Expanded Liquids.” 2003. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5272.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Spuller, Matthew Thomas. “Resist and Residue Removal Using Gas-Expanded Liquids.” 2003. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Spuller MT. Resist and Residue Removal Using Gas-Expanded Liquids. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2003. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5272.

Council of Science Editors:

Spuller MT. Resist and Residue Removal Using Gas-Expanded Liquids. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2003. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/5272


Georgia Tech

2. Timmons, Christopher L. Fluorocarbon Post-Etch Residue Removal Using Radical Anion Chemistry.

Degree: PhD, Chemical Engineering, 2004, Georgia Tech

During fabrication of integrated circuits, fluorocarbon plasma etching is used to pattern dielectric layers. As a byproduct of the process, a fluorocarbon residue is deposited on exposed surfaces and must be removed for subsequent processing. Conventional fluorocarbon cleaning processes typically include at least one plasma or liquid treatment that is oxidative in nature. Oxidative chemistries, however, cause material degradation to next generation low-dielectric constant (low-k) materials that are currently being implemented into fabrication processes. This work addresses the need for alternative fluorocarbon-residue removal chemistries that are compatible with next generation low-k materials. Radical anion chemistries are known for their ability to defluorinate fluorocarbon materials by a reductive mechanism. Naphthalene radical anion solutions, generated using sodium metal, are used to establish cleaning effectiveness with planar model residue films. The penetration rate of the defluorination reaction into model fluorocarbon film residues is measured and modeled. Because sodium is incompatible with integrated circuit processing, naphthalene radical anions are alternatively generated using electrochemical techniques. Using electrochemically-generated radical anions, residue removal from industrially patterned etch structures is used to evaluate the process cleaning efficiency. Optimization of the radical anion concentration and exposure time is important for effective residue removal. The efficiency of removal also depends on the feature spacing and the electrochemical solvent chosen. The synergistic combination of radical anion defluorination and wetting or swelling of the residue by the solvent is necessary for complete removal. In order to understand the interaction between the solvent and the residue, the surface and interfacial energy are determined using an Owens/Wendt analysis. These studies reveal chemical similarities between specific solvents and the model residue films. This approach can also be used to predict residue or film swelling by interaction with chemically similar solvents. Advisors/Committee Members: Hess, Dennis (Committee Chair), Kohl, Paul (Committee Member), Liotta, Charles (Committee Member), Meredith, Carson (Committee Member), Schork, Joseph (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Radical anions; Fluorocarbon post-etch residue; Semiconductors Cleaning; Anions; Semiconductor wafers Cleaning

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Timmons, C. L. (2004). Fluorocarbon Post-Etch Residue Removal Using Radical Anion Chemistry. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/10583

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Timmons, Christopher L. “Fluorocarbon Post-Etch Residue Removal Using Radical Anion Chemistry.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/10583.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Timmons, Christopher L. “Fluorocarbon Post-Etch Residue Removal Using Radical Anion Chemistry.” 2004. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Timmons CL. Fluorocarbon Post-Etch Residue Removal Using Radical Anion Chemistry. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2004. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/10583.

Council of Science Editors:

Timmons CL. Fluorocarbon Post-Etch Residue Removal Using Radical Anion Chemistry. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2004. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/10583


Georgia Tech

3. Myneni, Satyanarayana. Post Plasma Etch Residue Removal Using Carbon Dioxide Based Fluids.

Degree: PhD, Chemical Engineering, 2004, Georgia Tech

As feature sizes in semiconductor devices become smaller and newer materials are incorporated, current methods for photoresist and post plasma etch residue removal face several challenges. A cleaning process should be environmentally benign, compatible with dielectric materials and copper, and provide residue removal from narrow and high aspect ratio features. In this work, sub-critical CO2 based mixtures have been developed to remove the etch residues; these mixtures satisfy the above requirements and can potentially replace the two step residue removal process currently used in the integrated circuit (IC) industry. Based on the chemical nature of the residue being removed, additives or co-solvents to CO2 have been identified that can remove the residues without damaging the dielectric layers. Using the phase behavior of these additives as a guide, the composition of the co-solvent was altered to achieve a single liquid phase at moderate pressures without compromising cleaning ability. The extent of residue removal has been analyzed primarily by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Various techniques such as attenuated total reflection - Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, angle-resolved XPS (ARXPS), and interferometry were used to probe the interaction of cleaning fluids with residues. Model films of photoresists and plasma deposited residues were used to assist in understanding the mechanism of residue removal. From these studies, it was concluded that residue removal takes place primarily by attack of the interface between the residue and the substrate; a solvent rinse then lifts these residues from the wafer. It has been shown that transport of the additives to the interface is enhanced in the presence of CO2. From positronium annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) studies on a porous dielectric film, it has been shown that these high pressure fluids do not cause significant changes to the pore sizes or the bonding structure of the film. Hence, this method can be used to remove post etch residues from low-k dielectric films. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Dennis W. Hess (Committee Chair), Dr. Amyn S. Teja (Committee Member), Dr. Charles A. Eckert (Committee Member), Dr. Charles L. Liotta (Committee Member), Dr. J. Carson Meredith (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Low-K; Angle resolved XPS; Surface cleaning; Supercritical carbon dioxide; ATR-FTIR; Fluorocarbon residue; Etch residue; Semiconductors Cleaning; Plasma etching; Liquid carbon dioxide Industrial applications

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Myneni, S. (2004). Post Plasma Etch Residue Removal Using Carbon Dioxide Based Fluids. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7605

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Myneni, Satyanarayana. “Post Plasma Etch Residue Removal Using Carbon Dioxide Based Fluids.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7605.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Myneni, Satyanarayana. “Post Plasma Etch Residue Removal Using Carbon Dioxide Based Fluids.” 2004. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Myneni S. Post Plasma Etch Residue Removal Using Carbon Dioxide Based Fluids. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2004. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7605.

Council of Science Editors:

Myneni S. Post Plasma Etch Residue Removal Using Carbon Dioxide Based Fluids. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2004. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/7605

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