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You searched for subject:(Semantic treatment). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of South Carolina

1. Degarmo, Rebekah Dianne. Do Baseline Language Impairment Measures Predict Anomia Treatment Outcome?.

Degree: M.S.P., Communication Sciences and Disorders, 2010, University of South Carolina

Most treatment approaches used with people with aphasia include a phonological or semantic focus; many studies have examined the effectiveness of these approaches. Some studies have sought to determine if patients' impairment level is associated with treatment outcome following administration of a specific treatment approach. Several studies have produced conflicting and, therefore, inconclusive results concerning whether treatment specifics can be tailored towards a given patient's impairment level. This study proposed that pre-treatment indicators of deficit type may be able to predict anomia treatment outcome. Pre-treatment indicators included counts of semantic and phonemic paraphasias; naming ability; and the abilities to make semantic associations, to repeat words and phrases, to follow directions, and to produce words fluently. After receiving two weeks of intensive semantic and phonological treatment through the use of cueing hierarchies, changes in the participants' correct naming scores and counts of semantic and phonemic paraphasias post-treatment were documented. The analysis revealed that few relationships were strongly correlated and considered significant (p=.01). The strongest relationships revealed that post-treatment changes to participants' correct naming scores and paraphasia counts were similar following both treatment approaches, which suggests that utilizing a specific treatment approach for specific deficit type is perhaps not as necessary as was previously believed. Advisors/Committee Members: Julius Fridriksson.

Subjects/Keywords: Aphasia; Cueing hierarchies; Phonological treatment; Predictor of treatment outcome; Semantic treatment

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APA (6th Edition):

Degarmo, R. D. (2010). Do Baseline Language Impairment Measures Predict Anomia Treatment Outcome?. (Masters Thesis). University of South Carolina. Retrieved from https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/333

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Degarmo, Rebekah Dianne. “Do Baseline Language Impairment Measures Predict Anomia Treatment Outcome?.” 2010. Masters Thesis, University of South Carolina. Accessed October 21, 2019. https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/333.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Degarmo, Rebekah Dianne. “Do Baseline Language Impairment Measures Predict Anomia Treatment Outcome?.” 2010. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Degarmo RD. Do Baseline Language Impairment Measures Predict Anomia Treatment Outcome?. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of South Carolina; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/333.

Council of Science Editors:

Degarmo RD. Do Baseline Language Impairment Measures Predict Anomia Treatment Outcome?. [Masters Thesis]. University of South Carolina; 2010. Available from: https://scholarcommons.sc.edu/etd/333


University of South Florida

2. Karidas, Stephanie. Does the Use of Personally Relevant Stimuli in Semantic Complexity Training Facilitate Improved Functional Communication Performance Compared to Non-Personally Relevant Stimulus Items among Adults with Chronic Aphasia?.

Degree: 2013, University of South Florida

This study investigated the influence of semantic complexity treatment in individuals with fluent aphasia on discourse performance. Semantic treatment is an effective way to improve semantically based word retrieval problems in aphasia. Treatment focused on the semantic application of the Complexity Account of Treatment Efficacy (CATE) (Thompson, Shapiro, Kiran, & Sobecks, 2003) promotes training of complex items resulting in generalization to less complex, untrained items. In addition, research has shown that the personal relevance of treatment material can increase treatment efficacy. This study investigated the effect of semantic treatment of atypical personally relevant items among individuals with aphasia on discourse performance. Two treatment phases were applied to examine the influence of personally relevant and non-relevant treatment material on discourse performance. In addition, generalization from trained atypical items to untrained typical items was investigated. Methods and procedures were partially replicated from Kiran, Sandberg, & Sebastian (2011) examining semantic complexity within goal-derived (ad hoc) categories. Three participants with fluent aphasia were trained on three semantic tasks including category sorting, semantic feature generation/selection, and Yes/No feature questions. A generative naming task was used for probe data collection every second session. Stimuli consisted of atypical items only. The hypothesis that semantic complexity training of personally relevant items from ad hoc categories will produce greater generalization to associated, untrained items than training of non-relevant items and consequently increase discourse performance was not supported. The findings revealed a failure to replicate the magnitude and type of improvements previously reported for the typicality effect in generative naming. Clinical significance was found for personally relevant and non-relevant discourse performance. However, no consistent pattern was found within and across participants. In addition, effect size for generalization from trained atypical to untrained typical items was not significant. Limitations of this study lead to future directions to further specify participation selection, such as cognitive abilities, procedural changes, and the inclusion of discourse performance as an outcome measure. Overall, the results of this study provide weak support for replicating semantic treatment of atypical exemplars in ad-hoc categories and hence demonstrate the critical role of replication across labs to identify key issues in the candidacy, procedures, and outcome measurement of any developing treatment.

Subjects/Keywords: aphasia; atypicality; complexity account; personal relevance; semantic treatment; Speech and Hearing Science

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Karidas, S. (2013). Does the Use of Personally Relevant Stimuli in Semantic Complexity Training Facilitate Improved Functional Communication Performance Compared to Non-Personally Relevant Stimulus Items among Adults with Chronic Aphasia?. (Thesis). University of South Florida. Retrieved from https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/4704

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Karidas, Stephanie. “Does the Use of Personally Relevant Stimuli in Semantic Complexity Training Facilitate Improved Functional Communication Performance Compared to Non-Personally Relevant Stimulus Items among Adults with Chronic Aphasia?.” 2013. Thesis, University of South Florida. Accessed October 21, 2019. https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/4704.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Karidas, Stephanie. “Does the Use of Personally Relevant Stimuli in Semantic Complexity Training Facilitate Improved Functional Communication Performance Compared to Non-Personally Relevant Stimulus Items among Adults with Chronic Aphasia?.” 2013. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Karidas S. Does the Use of Personally Relevant Stimuli in Semantic Complexity Training Facilitate Improved Functional Communication Performance Compared to Non-Personally Relevant Stimulus Items among Adults with Chronic Aphasia?. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of South Florida; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/4704.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Karidas S. Does the Use of Personally Relevant Stimuli in Semantic Complexity Training Facilitate Improved Functional Communication Performance Compared to Non-Personally Relevant Stimulus Items among Adults with Chronic Aphasia?. [Thesis]. University of South Florida; 2013. Available from: https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/etd/4704

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Duquesne University

3. Snyder, Chad. Examining the Impact of Crisis Assessment Training in the Triage Assessment Model, on the Self-Efficacy of Residential Treatment Facility Staff.

Degree: PhD, Counselor Education and Supervision (ExCES), 2006, Duquesne University

The differences between residential treatment facility staffs' self-efficacy levels post-crisis assessment training are investigated in order to identify alternative means to restraints as the primary crisis intervention strategy. In order to assess the participants' level of self-efficacy to deal with crises, the self-efficacy assessment tool for crisis (SEAT-C) was developed utilizing a semantic differential design. Through pilot testing, the SEAT-C was determined to be a reliable and valid instrument. Training in the Triage Assessment Model for crisis intervention was provided to 79 residential treatment facility staff employed at a child and adolescent residential treatment facility in the southwestern part of a Mid-Atlantic state. Following the training, participants completed the SEAT-C and the results of the experimental and control groups' level of self efficacy are compared across the four crisis concepts: crisis as danger, crisis as opportunity, crisis as assessment and crisis as intervention. The four crisis concepts are examined across the three timeframes of pre-crisis, crisis and post-crisis. The results indicate that significantly statistical differences exist within the sub-hypotheses of the concepts: pre-crisis as assessment, pre-crisis as opportunity, crisis as danger and crisis as assessment. Advisors/Committee Members: Rick A. Myer, Jim Schreiber, William J. Casile.

Subjects/Keywords: Crisis; Crisis Training; Least Restrictive Interventions; Mental Health; Residential Treatment Facility; Restraints; Self-Efficacy; Self-Efficacy Assessment; Semantic Differential Design; Staff Training

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Snyder, C. (2006). Examining the Impact of Crisis Assessment Training in the Triage Assessment Model, on the Self-Efficacy of Residential Treatment Facility Staff. (Doctoral Dissertation). Duquesne University. Retrieved from https://dsc.duq.edu/etd/1223

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Snyder, Chad. “Examining the Impact of Crisis Assessment Training in the Triage Assessment Model, on the Self-Efficacy of Residential Treatment Facility Staff.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, Duquesne University. Accessed October 21, 2019. https://dsc.duq.edu/etd/1223.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Snyder, Chad. “Examining the Impact of Crisis Assessment Training in the Triage Assessment Model, on the Self-Efficacy of Residential Treatment Facility Staff.” 2006. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Snyder C. Examining the Impact of Crisis Assessment Training in the Triage Assessment Model, on the Self-Efficacy of Residential Treatment Facility Staff. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Duquesne University; 2006. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: https://dsc.duq.edu/etd/1223.

Council of Science Editors:

Snyder C. Examining the Impact of Crisis Assessment Training in the Triage Assessment Model, on the Self-Efficacy of Residential Treatment Facility Staff. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Duquesne University; 2006. Available from: https://dsc.duq.edu/etd/1223

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