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You searched for subject:(Selective eating). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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California State University – Sacramento

1. Whelan, Colleen M. A comparison of simultaneous versus sequential meal presentation with picky eaters.

Degree: MA, Psychology (Applied Behavior Analysis, 2016, California State University – Sacramento

This study extends the research on the effects of simultaneous and sequential food presentation methods with children who are picky eaters. An age-appropriate sized portion of non-preferred food (NPF) was presented as an ???appetizer??? before the participant???s preferred food (PF) was presented. Participants were required to consume their NPF before gaining access to their PF (i.e., dinner). This Appetizer Presentation Method is compared to a simultaneous presentation method called, Total Meal Presentation. In the Total Meal Presentation, a whole portion of both foods were presented together on the same plate and the participants were allowed to eat what they choose. Three participants, between ages 3 to 6, participated in this study. The Appetizer Presentation Method, was effective in increasing consumption of NP foods for two of the three participants. Advisors/Committee Members: Penrod, Becky.

Subjects/Keywords: Feeding; Feeding intervention; Simultaneous presentation; Sequential presentation; Picky eating; Selective eating; Food selectivity

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APA (6th Edition):

Whelan, C. M. (2016). A comparison of simultaneous versus sequential meal presentation with picky eaters. (Masters Thesis). California State University – Sacramento. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10211.3/182679

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Whelan, Colleen M. “A comparison of simultaneous versus sequential meal presentation with picky eaters.” 2016. Masters Thesis, California State University – Sacramento. Accessed April 27, 2017. http://hdl.handle.net/10211.3/182679.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Whelan, Colleen M. “A comparison of simultaneous versus sequential meal presentation with picky eaters.” 2016. Web. 27 Apr 2017.

Vancouver:

Whelan CM. A comparison of simultaneous versus sequential meal presentation with picky eaters. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. California State University – Sacramento; 2016. [cited 2017 Apr 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10211.3/182679.

Council of Science Editors:

Whelan CM. A comparison of simultaneous versus sequential meal presentation with picky eaters. [Masters Thesis]. California State University – Sacramento; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10211.3/182679

2. Mawbey, Charlotte. Neuropsychological profiles of children and adolescents with selective eating in the presence or absence of elevated autistic traits.

Degree: PhD, 2014, Royal Holloway, University of London

Selective eating (SE) refers to an individual narrowing their range of preferred foods, resulting in a restricted food intake, high levels of rigidity and food refusal (Bryant-Waugh, 2000). SE is encompassed in the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5th Edition (DSM-V) (American Psychiatric Association, 2013) category avoidant restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID). Such difficulties are common in children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) (Raiten & Massaro, 1986) and neuropsychological differences have been found in children with ASD (Hill, 2004). This research aimed to be the first to investigate whether a distinct neuropsychological profile exists in children and adolescents with SE and furthermore, whether aspects of the profile vary depending on whether the child or adolescent displays elevated autistic traits. A case series of 10 children between the ages of 8 to 13 years old were recruited. A well-established neuropsychological test battery, the Ravello Profile (Rose, Frampton & Lask, 2012), was modified and administered to assess visuospatial processing, central coherence, executive functions (including cognitive flexibility, inhibition and planning) and theory of mind abilities. The results demonstrated a high degree of variability across the group in terms of visuospatial processing and theory of mind, weak central coherence across all participants and otherwise relatively intact abilities in executive function domains. There were no substantive findings in relation to those children with elevated autistic traits although a trend toward visuospatial processing differences did emerge. This exploratory case series was the first attempt to describe a neuropsychological profile in SE, however the small sample size and high variability in the data meant that a distinct neuropsychological profile did not emerge. The results did however provide an initial indication of possible trends in strengths and weaknesses across neuropsychological domains in SE. These findings have implications for the assessment and treatment of SE difficulties.

Subjects/Keywords: 616.85; selective eating; SE; autism spectrum disorder; ASD; autism; neuropsychology; neuropsychological profile

…181 9 1.0 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Introduction to selective eating Feeding difficulties are a… …difficulties in childhood is selective eating (SE), which has been described as an… …autistic traits. 1.2 Diagnosis and classification of selective eating 1.2.1 The diagnostic… …category in which selective eaters were historically classified was eating disorder not otherwise… …infancy. 1.3 Clinical presentations in selective eating Whilst SE is common in toddlerhood and… 

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APA (6th Edition):

Mawbey, C. (2014). Neuropsychological profiles of children and adolescents with selective eating in the presence or absence of elevated autistic traits. (Doctoral Dissertation). Royal Holloway, University of London. Retrieved from http://digirep.rhul.ac.uk/items/e2d55d91-2c50-2938-3de7-93fc6fbc70d9/1/ ; http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.628548

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mawbey, Charlotte. “Neuropsychological profiles of children and adolescents with selective eating in the presence or absence of elevated autistic traits.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Royal Holloway, University of London. Accessed April 27, 2017. http://digirep.rhul.ac.uk/items/e2d55d91-2c50-2938-3de7-93fc6fbc70d9/1/ ; http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.628548.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mawbey, Charlotte. “Neuropsychological profiles of children and adolescents with selective eating in the presence or absence of elevated autistic traits.” 2014. Web. 27 Apr 2017.

Vancouver:

Mawbey C. Neuropsychological profiles of children and adolescents with selective eating in the presence or absence of elevated autistic traits. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Royal Holloway, University of London; 2014. [cited 2017 Apr 27]. Available from: http://digirep.rhul.ac.uk/items/e2d55d91-2c50-2938-3de7-93fc6fbc70d9/1/ ; http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.628548.

Council of Science Editors:

Mawbey C. Neuropsychological profiles of children and adolescents with selective eating in the presence or absence of elevated autistic traits. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Royal Holloway, University of London; 2014. Available from: http://digirep.rhul.ac.uk/items/e2d55d91-2c50-2938-3de7-93fc6fbc70d9/1/ ; http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.628548

3. Lantier, Caitlin E. A Snack Time Intervention for Children with Developmental Disabilities: Steps to Increase Exploration, Communication, and Participation.

Degree: MS, Allied Medical Professions, 2012, The Ohio State University

Research tells us that nutrition is a crucial component of health throughout our lifetime. Up to 80% of children with developmental disabilities have been reported to have one or more feeding issues. Research tells us that food preferences and dietary habits are established between the ages of two and five years old and has additionally established that the food choices and eating behaviors of others influence young children’s food preferences. Meal times in schools and at home offer the opportunity for children to develop social skills and learn to participate in a mealtime routine with others. It is estimated that approximately two out of three children ages 6 years or younger in the US are in non-parental child-care programs. Feeding studies in children with developmental disabilities have been clinically focused and address the meal time relationship between the child and parental caregiver or the child and a clinician. These feeding interventions, although successful, are individualized for each child. This process to meet specific individual needs would prove to be unrealistic in a childcare setting where the ratio of caregiver to child is often 1:4 or more. The aim of this research was to determine if a family style dining approach to snack time in an inclusive classrooms for children with neurodevelopmental and related disabilities aged 2-4 years old would impact interest and exploration of a variety of foods as well as improve interest in social interaction and engagement in meal time practices of all children involved. A convenience sample of 4 subjects was chosen from an inclusive preschool classroom at the Early Childhood Education center of The Ohio State University. The snack time intervention lasted for eight days over a two-week period. Videos were taken on the first and last day of the intervention for data collection. Results showed an increase in exploration and communication between the first and last day of the intervention. Participation in the snack time routine decreased due to successful implementation by a particular caregiver paired with a particular subject during the first day of the intervention. Overall qualitative analysis indicated an increase in participation measured by passing of bowls and plates increased on behalf of the entire group participating in the intervention period. Family style dining is an effective approach to increasing exploration of food, participation in snack time routines, and communication with peers due to the nature of the meal time design. It encourages children to take an active role in the meal time routine and increases their interest in trying new foods. With thorough teacher or caregiver training and practice, family style dining is a successful approach to increasing food exploration, communication with others, and participation in the meal time routine. This study reinforces the importance for teacher training in nutrition in childcare. Advisors/Committee Members: Nahikian-Nelms, Marcia (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Early Childhood Education; Nutrition; Occupational Therapy; Family style dining; developmental disabilities; picky eating; selective eating; problem eating; snack time in preschools of children with developmental disabilities; eating and children with developmental disabilities

…9 2.1 Etiology of eating irregularities in typically developing children and children with… …child. Research additionally has established that the food choices and eating behaviors of… …more likely to accept new foods if caregivers enthusiastically modeled eating the foods5… …nutritional intake at meal times. Feeding and eating difficulties are commonplace within the… …developmental disabilities have been reported to have some form of feeding or eating difficulty at… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lantier, C. E. (2012). A Snack Time Intervention for Children with Developmental Disabilities: Steps to Increase Exploration, Communication, and Participation. (Masters Thesis). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1338331523

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lantier, Caitlin E. “A Snack Time Intervention for Children with Developmental Disabilities: Steps to Increase Exploration, Communication, and Participation.” 2012. Masters Thesis, The Ohio State University. Accessed April 27, 2017. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1338331523.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lantier, Caitlin E. “A Snack Time Intervention for Children with Developmental Disabilities: Steps to Increase Exploration, Communication, and Participation.” 2012. Web. 27 Apr 2017.

Vancouver:

Lantier CE. A Snack Time Intervention for Children with Developmental Disabilities: Steps to Increase Exploration, Communication, and Participation. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2012. [cited 2017 Apr 27]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1338331523.

Council of Science Editors:

Lantier CE. A Snack Time Intervention for Children with Developmental Disabilities: Steps to Increase Exploration, Communication, and Participation. [Masters Thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2012. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1338331523

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