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You searched for subject:(Secret keys). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Utah

1. Lakshmane Gowda, Prarthana. Exploring bluetooth for received signal strength indicator-based secret key extraction.

Degree: MS, Computer Science, 2012, University of Utah

Current approaches to secret key extraction using Received Signal Strength Indicator(RSSI) measurements mainly use the WiFi interface. However, in the presence of jammingadversaries and other interfering devices, the efficiency of RSSI-based secret key extractionusing WiFi degrades and sometimes the key extraction may even fail completely. A possiblemethod to overcome this problem is to collect RSSI measurements using the Bluetoothinterface. Bluetooth appears to be very promising for secret key extraction since theadaptive frequency hopping technique in Bluetooth automatically detects and avoids theuse of bad or interfering channels. In order to collect Bluetooth RSSI values, we design aprotocol where Alice and Bob use Google Nexus one phones to exchange L2CAP packets andthen we measure the RSSI for each received packet. We use a prequantization interpolationstep to reduce the probability of bit mismatches that are caused due to the inabililty tomeasure the time-duplex channel simultaneously by Alice and Bob. We then use the ASBGquantization scheme followed by information reconciliation and privacy amplification toextract the secret key bits. We conduct numerous experiments to evaluate the efficiencyof Bluetooth for secret key extraction under two di↵erent mobile environments - hallwaysand outdoors. The secret bit rates obtained from these experiments highlight that outdoorsettings are better suited for key extraction using Bluetooth when compared to hallwaysettings. Furthermore, we show that for very small distances such as 2 ft, the number ofconsecutive “0” RSSI values and bit mismatch is too high to extract any secret key bitsunder hallway settings. Finally, we also show that Bluetooth key extraction in outdoorsachieves secret bit rates that are comparable toWiFi, even when using lower transmit powerthan WiFi.

Subjects/Keywords: Android; Bluetooth; RSSI; Secret keys

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lakshmane Gowda, P. (2012). Exploring bluetooth for received signal strength indicator-based secret key extraction. (Masters Thesis). University of Utah. Retrieved from http://content.lib.utah.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/etd3/id/2052/rec/979

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lakshmane Gowda, Prarthana. “Exploring bluetooth for received signal strength indicator-based secret key extraction.” 2012. Masters Thesis, University of Utah. Accessed October 18, 2019. http://content.lib.utah.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/etd3/id/2052/rec/979.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lakshmane Gowda, Prarthana. “Exploring bluetooth for received signal strength indicator-based secret key extraction.” 2012. Web. 18 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Lakshmane Gowda P. Exploring bluetooth for received signal strength indicator-based secret key extraction. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Utah; 2012. [cited 2019 Oct 18]. Available from: http://content.lib.utah.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/etd3/id/2052/rec/979.

Council of Science Editors:

Lakshmane Gowda P. Exploring bluetooth for received signal strength indicator-based secret key extraction. [Masters Thesis]. University of Utah; 2012. Available from: http://content.lib.utah.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/etd3/id/2052/rec/979

2. Bharath, Tati. A framework to implement delegation in offline PACS : A strategy to restrict user’s path.

Degree: Information and Communication Technology (ICT), 2013, KTH

Physical access control systems (PACS) deal with the security of the availability of resources. They work as an alternative to traditional manual security access control. Access control has two variants, the logical which deals with computer environments and the physical which deals with the physical entry into a property or warehouses. However, offline physical access control systems cannot enforce the user’s path making it unsuitable for use in classified areas, such as places where the public is restricted. Therefore, offline PACS need a framework that can delegate the authority to enforce the user’s path. This is satisfactorily met in the presented research with a new design of offline PACS that has the capability to implement delegation. This framework allows the locks to dynamically write and read access policies onto and from a smart card. It works by means of a construct called “Path Array” and communication among different entities occurs via a chain of trust formed with the use of pre-shared keys.

Subjects/Keywords: smart card authentication; offline physical access control; delegation; shared secret keys; design science

…RFID tokens, NFC devices and smart cards replace the traditional keys. A user can access… …key. Trusted Authorities (TA’s) can be used to deliver the keys both for the… …possesses two keys called private and public key. This is in contrast with symmetric key where one… …encrypting and decrypting, we use public key and private keys respectively, thus making use of two… …different keys for different operations (Garfinkel 1996). The distribution of public… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bharath, T. (2013). A framework to implement delegation in offline PACS : A strategy to restrict user’s path. (Thesis). KTH. Retrieved from http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-127851

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bharath, Tati. “A framework to implement delegation in offline PACS : A strategy to restrict user’s path.” 2013. Thesis, KTH. Accessed October 18, 2019. http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-127851.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bharath, Tati. “A framework to implement delegation in offline PACS : A strategy to restrict user’s path.” 2013. Web. 18 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Bharath T. A framework to implement delegation in offline PACS : A strategy to restrict user’s path. [Internet] [Thesis]. KTH; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 18]. Available from: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-127851.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Bharath T. A framework to implement delegation in offline PACS : A strategy to restrict user’s path. [Thesis]. KTH; 2013. Available from: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-127851

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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