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You searched for subject:(Schema enmeshment). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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IUPUI

1. Steiner, Jennifer Leah. The Utility of the Implicit Association Test in the Measurement of Pain and Self-schema Enmeshment in Fibromyalgia Patients.

Degree: 2011, IUPUI

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI)

Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS) is a chronic, painful rheumatic condition characterized by recurrent musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, and nonrestorative sleep, for which there is currently no biological marker. People who suffer from fibromyalgia are extremely susceptible to the effects of psychological stressors which may in turn exacerbate the symptoms of the disease. As unrelenting pain is the main symptom of fibromyalgia, it follows that patients would experience personal losses and changes in their self-schemas or the way in which they view themselves as a result. This study was particularly focused on identifying the enmeshment of self-schemas and pain-schemas, and the extent to which women with fibromyalgia experience pain and self-schema enmeshment (PSSE). Additionally, this study sought to determine the utility of using the Implicit Association Test as a measure of PSSE. The present study compared FMS patients to a group of diabetes patients on several measures of schema enmeshment, including the IAT. It was hypothesized that the two disease groups would differ significantly on the level of PSSE indicated by the IAT, and the two disease groups would not differ on enmeshment with illness indicated by the IAT. Additionally it was hypothesized that the IAT would be correlated with explicit measures of PSSE. Results did not support either of these hypotheses; however the sample size and statistical power necessary to test these hypotheses was severely lacking and thus they could not be evaluated in an appropriate manner. Results did not support the hypothesis that the IAT would be highly correlated with the explicit measures of PSSE. Based on these results and the existing literature, it is still somewhat unclear as to whether or not the IAT would be an acceptable/feasible tool in assessing PSSE in fibromyalgia patients.

Advisors/Committee Members: Bigatti, Silvia M., Stewart, Jesse C., Ashburn-Nardo, Leslie.

Subjects/Keywords: PRISM; Implicit Association Test; schema enmeshment; Fibromyalgia; Fibromyalgia; Pain; Self-perception

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Steiner, J. L. (2011). The Utility of the Implicit Association Test in the Measurement of Pain and Self-schema Enmeshment in Fibromyalgia Patients. (Thesis). IUPUI. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1805/2476

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Steiner, Jennifer Leah. “The Utility of the Implicit Association Test in the Measurement of Pain and Self-schema Enmeshment in Fibromyalgia Patients.” 2011. Thesis, IUPUI. Accessed September 24, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1805/2476.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Steiner, Jennifer Leah. “The Utility of the Implicit Association Test in the Measurement of Pain and Self-schema Enmeshment in Fibromyalgia Patients.” 2011. Web. 24 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Steiner JL. The Utility of the Implicit Association Test in the Measurement of Pain and Self-schema Enmeshment in Fibromyalgia Patients. [Internet] [Thesis]. IUPUI; 2011. [cited 2020 Sep 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1805/2476.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Steiner JL. The Utility of the Implicit Association Test in the Measurement of Pain and Self-schema Enmeshment in Fibromyalgia Patients. [Thesis]. IUPUI; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1805/2476

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Louisville

2. Meyer, Jeffrey A. Integration of the avoidance cycle with the schema enmeshment model of pain : relationships with quality of life and disability in chronic, nonmalignant pain.

Degree: PhD, 2009, University of Louisville

Persons living with chronic pain encounter a host of physical and psychosocial problems resulting in a loss of quality of life and increased disability. The construct of avoidance has been proposed as a mechanism by which these changes in functioning occur. This study explored the Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) construct of experiential avoidance and its conceptualization within the ACT model of avoidance, the Cycle of Avoidance. The model is introduced as a framework for integrating an existing model of chronic pain and avoidance, the Schema Enmeshment Model of Pain (SEMP), thus providing a more comprehensive perspective. The study used empirically validated measures to explore constructs integral to the Avoidance Cycle, namely anxiety sensitivity, catastrophizing, experiential avoidance, and their associations with anxiety, depression, quality of life, and disability. The construct of enmeshment, which is a major component of the SEMP, was examined as a conceptualization of the Avoidance Cycle's stage of Entanglement. The study also examined participant's perceptions of the temporal relationships in the Avoidance Cycle. The ACT and SEMP constructs were examined using multi-method assessment including written questionnaires, brief interview, and chart review. Participants were 139 adults with chronic, nonmalignant pain, recruited from a university pain clinic. Results showed that the components of the Avoidance Cycle of catastrophizing and pain-specific experiential avoidance predicted participants' degree of enmeshment and enmeshment in turn predicted the mental. component of quality of life and disability. Pain-specific experiential avoidance was shown to partially mediate the relationship between pain intensity and mental quality of life and disability, but enmeshment was not shown to be mediator between pain intensity and functional status. Regarding the temporal nature of chronic pain and psychological symptoms, rates of participants with self-reported psychological problems increased by 70% after onset of chronic pain. Further those participants who had higher scores on measures of catastrophising, enmeshment, and experiential avoidance were more likely to report their health as worse than one year ago. These results support the utility of using the Avoidance Cycle and SEMP as models of avoidance in chronic pain and explore relationships within the model. Advisors/Committee Members: Stetson, Barbara A..

Subjects/Keywords: Avoidance cycle; Schema enmeshment; Pain; Quality of life; Disability; Acceptance and commitment therapy; Chronic pain; ACT; Experiential avoidance; SEMP

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Meyer, J. A. (2009). Integration of the avoidance cycle with the schema enmeshment model of pain : relationships with quality of life and disability in chronic, nonmalignant pain. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Louisville. Retrieved from 10.18297/etd/971 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/971

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Meyer, Jeffrey A. “Integration of the avoidance cycle with the schema enmeshment model of pain : relationships with quality of life and disability in chronic, nonmalignant pain.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Louisville. Accessed September 24, 2020. 10.18297/etd/971 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/971.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Meyer, Jeffrey A. “Integration of the avoidance cycle with the schema enmeshment model of pain : relationships with quality of life and disability in chronic, nonmalignant pain.” 2009. Web. 24 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Meyer JA. Integration of the avoidance cycle with the schema enmeshment model of pain : relationships with quality of life and disability in chronic, nonmalignant pain. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2009. [cited 2020 Sep 24]. Available from: 10.18297/etd/971 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/971.

Council of Science Editors:

Meyer JA. Integration of the avoidance cycle with the schema enmeshment model of pain : relationships with quality of life and disability in chronic, nonmalignant pain. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Louisville; 2009. Available from: 10.18297/etd/971 ; https://ir.library.louisville.edu/etd/971


IUPUI

3. Steiner, Jennifer Leah. Assessing the Efficacy of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in Reducing Schema-enmeshment in Fibromyalgia Syndrome.

Degree: 2014, IUPUI

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI)

The presence of a chronic pain condition can have a profound impact on one’s self-concept. Some individuals may have had to make major lifestyle changes. As a result, some people may start to define themselves in terms of their pain, such that their self-schema and pain-schemas become intertwined in a process termed schema-enmeshment. It is thought that schema-enmeshment is related to psychological distress making it a prime target for intervention. Little research has been conducted on interventions to reduce schema-enmeshment. Acceptance-based interventions may be especially appropriate in reducing schema-enmeshment or the connection between self and illness symptoms as these interventions tend to emphasize learning to live with pain and other symptoms and to work toward important life goals rather than continually fighting against the condition and allowing it to control their life. This study is a randomized trial comparing Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) to education about pain management in a sample of women with Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS). The primary aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of ACT in reducing schema-enmeshment between self and pain, as well as enmeshment between self and other symptoms and FMS as a whole. In addition, this study also explored the role of pain acceptance, specifically activity engagement as a mediator of the relationship between treatment group membership and changes in schema-enmeshment. The data was analyzed as an intent-to-treat analysis using the “last measure carried forward” method. Results indicated that the ACT group reported statistically significant differences in self schema-enmeshment with FMS, fatigue, and cognitive symptoms, but not with pain, following the intervention, compared to the educational control group. In each of these cases, the ACT group experienced greater reductions in schema-enmeshment compared to the education group. Interestingly, no statistically significant differences were observed for schema-enmeshment with pain. Statistically significant group differences were also observed for acceptance of pain following the intervention. Finally, a mediational model in which changes in activity engagement (a form of pain acceptance) served as the mediator of the relationship between treatment group and changes in schema-enmeshment with FMS was tested. The model was tested using a bootstrapping method, and results revealed a trend toward a significant indirect effect of changes in activity engagement leading to changes in schema-enmeshment with FMS. Taken together, the results of this study indicate that ACT may be a promising intervention for targeting maladaptive beliefs about the self in relation to illness, especially schema-enmeshment of self with illness and illness symptoms. Additionally, there is evidence that ACT may target key constructs such as activity engagement, which may be related to other cognitive and behavioral changes. Future directions for…

Advisors/Committee Members: Hirsh, Adam, Bigatti, Silvia M., Ashburn-Nardo, Leslie, Stewart, Jesse C., Grahame, Nicholas J..

Subjects/Keywords: Fibromyalgia; Acceptance and Commitment Therapy; Schema-enmeshment; PRISM; Fibromyalgia  – Psychological aspects  – Measurement  – Research; Chronic pain  – Psychological aspects; Chronic pain  – Treatment; Schemas (Psychology)  – Research; Acceptance and commitment therapy  – Research; Distress (Psychology); Pain perception  – Research; Chronically ill  – Attitudes; Women  – Diseases  – Research; Cognitive therapy; Fatigue  – Treatment; Self-efficacy  – Research; Self psychology  – Research

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Steiner, J. L. (2014). Assessing the Efficacy of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in Reducing Schema-enmeshment in Fibromyalgia Syndrome. (Thesis). IUPUI. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1805/4984

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Steiner, Jennifer Leah. “Assessing the Efficacy of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in Reducing Schema-enmeshment in Fibromyalgia Syndrome.” 2014. Thesis, IUPUI. Accessed September 24, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1805/4984.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Steiner, Jennifer Leah. “Assessing the Efficacy of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in Reducing Schema-enmeshment in Fibromyalgia Syndrome.” 2014. Web. 24 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Steiner JL. Assessing the Efficacy of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in Reducing Schema-enmeshment in Fibromyalgia Syndrome. [Internet] [Thesis]. IUPUI; 2014. [cited 2020 Sep 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1805/4984.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Steiner JL. Assessing the Efficacy of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in Reducing Schema-enmeshment in Fibromyalgia Syndrome. [Thesis]. IUPUI; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1805/4984

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.