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You searched for subject:(Runtime Technologies). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Rice University

1. Yang, Chaoran. Runtime Technologies of High Performance Parallel Computing.

Degree: PhD, Engineering, 2016, Rice University

Due to power constraints, future growth in computing capability must explicitly leverage parallelism in software to effectively exploit hardware parallelism found in both distributed and shared memory systems. The past decades have seen vast improvements in the performance of key building blocks of parallel computing, including communication runtime systems, runtime schedulers, and concurrent data structures. In the pursuit of high performance, however, these building blocks compromise on other desirable properties such as applicability and interoperability. The applicability problem of a parallel algorithm restricts the range of environments to which it applies. The interoperability problem of a parallel library prohibits arbitrary inter- action between new parallel code with legacy or serial code, which poses an obstacle to incremental adoption of new parallel libraries. In this thesis, I investigate the issues of applicability and interoperability in three key building blocks of parallel computing—a communication runtime for a partitioned global address space languages, a work-stealing runtime scheduler, and a concurrent FIFO queue. I demonstrate that these high performance building blocks of parallel software can be made fully interoperable with legacy or serial code and applicable in a broader range of environments while yielding equal or better performance. Advisors/Committee Members: Mellor-Crummey, John (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Runtime Technologies; High Performance Computing; Parallel Computing; Partitioned Global Address Space; Work-stealing; Concurrent Data Structures

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Yang, C. (2016). Runtime Technologies of High Performance Parallel Computing. (Doctoral Dissertation). Rice University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1911/95637

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yang, Chaoran. “Runtime Technologies of High Performance Parallel Computing.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Rice University. Accessed January 19, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1911/95637.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yang, Chaoran. “Runtime Technologies of High Performance Parallel Computing.” 2016. Web. 19 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Yang C. Runtime Technologies of High Performance Parallel Computing. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Rice University; 2016. [cited 2020 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1911/95637.

Council of Science Editors:

Yang C. Runtime Technologies of High Performance Parallel Computing. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Rice University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1911/95637

2. McNamara, Caolan. Runtime Automated Detection of Out of Process Resource Management in the X Windowing System.

Degree: 2009, Regis University

Software applications typically allocate and deallocate resources during their lifetime. Resources can be categorized into two broad groups, in-process and out-of-process resources where in-process resources are local resources directly managed by a client, while out-of-process resources are remotely managed by a client which instructs a server to allocate and deallocate the resource on its behalf. Out-of-process resources do not reside in a clients address space which poses an extra layer of complexity in attempting to debug their misuse. This thesis presents an automatic run-time solution to the problem of detecting and reporting source code locations of application client mismanagement of out-of-process resources for a specific case-study of the X Windowing System which lends itself to use in the wider general case. Advisors/Committee Members: Birkenheuer, Nancy.

Subjects/Keywords: Computer Sciences; Physical Sciences and Mathematics; software; X Windowing System; debug; runtime; Regis University MSCIS thesis; resource management; College for Professional Studies; MS Software Engineering and Database Technologies; School of Computer & Information Science

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McNamara, C. (2009). Runtime Automated Detection of Out of Process Resource Management in the X Windowing System. (Thesis). Regis University. Retrieved from http://epublications.regis.edu/theses/7

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McNamara, Caolan. “Runtime Automated Detection of Out of Process Resource Management in the X Windowing System.” 2009. Thesis, Regis University. Accessed January 19, 2020. http://epublications.regis.edu/theses/7.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McNamara, Caolan. “Runtime Automated Detection of Out of Process Resource Management in the X Windowing System.” 2009. Web. 19 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

McNamara C. Runtime Automated Detection of Out of Process Resource Management in the X Windowing System. [Internet] [Thesis]. Regis University; 2009. [cited 2020 Jan 19]. Available from: http://epublications.regis.edu/theses/7.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

McNamara C. Runtime Automated Detection of Out of Process Resource Management in the X Windowing System. [Thesis]. Regis University; 2009. Available from: http://epublications.regis.edu/theses/7

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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