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You searched for subject:(Road decommissioning). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Humboldt State University

1. Wilson, Sarah Elisabeth. Post-treatment erosion of decommissioned forest road stream crossings.

Degree: MS, Natural Resources: Watershed Management, 2008, Humboldt State University

Forest road decommissioning projects have increased in number over the last two decades. The goal of this study is to provide information which can help to focus restoration efforts on the most cost-effective use of technique and treatment. To pursue this goal, I examined the strength of several variables which may control erosion rates, and evaluated the relative importance of the type of erosion each variable affects. This study explores the relationship between the physical characteristics of twenty excavated forest road stream crossings and the post-excavation erosion at each of those crossings. The study areas were located in northwest California, at sites within Headwaters Reserve, Six Rivers National Forest, and Klamath National Forest. Channel incision erosion contributed the greatest portion, 93 percent, of total post-treatment crossing erosion. In 16 of the 20 study crossings, channel incision accounted for all of the total post-treatment erosion. Post-treatment erosion from excavated banks contributed approximately seven percent of the total post-treatment erosion volume. The most significant independent variable in explaining the depth of post-treatment channel incision was watershed size. Watershed area explained 79 percent of the variation in channel incision depth within the Wildcat Formation, and 90 percent of the variation in observed post-treatment incision in two sandstone formations (Wildcat and Yager). Similarly, stream power was found to explain 65 percent of the variation in channel incision in the Wildcat Formation, and 56 percent of the variability in channel incision depth in the two sandstone formations. Advisors/Committee Members: Fulgham, Kenneth.

Subjects/Keywords: Road decommissioning; Stream crossings

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APA (6th Edition):

Wilson, S. E. (2008). Post-treatment erosion of decommissioned forest road stream crossings. (Masters Thesis). Humboldt State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2148/457

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wilson, Sarah Elisabeth. “Post-treatment erosion of decommissioned forest road stream crossings.” 2008. Masters Thesis, Humboldt State University. Accessed December 14, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2148/457.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wilson, Sarah Elisabeth. “Post-treatment erosion of decommissioned forest road stream crossings.” 2008. Web. 14 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Wilson SE. Post-treatment erosion of decommissioned forest road stream crossings. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Humboldt State University; 2008. [cited 2019 Dec 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2148/457.

Council of Science Editors:

Wilson SE. Post-treatment erosion of decommissioned forest road stream crossings. [Masters Thesis]. Humboldt State University; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2148/457


Colorado State University

2. Sosa Peréz, Gabriel. Road sediment production and delivery : effects of fires, traffic, and road decommissioning.

Degree: PhD, Geosciences, 2016, Colorado State University

Unpaved roads often are a major source of sediment to streams in forested watersheds, and an increase in sediment production and delivery can adversely degrade water quality and aquatic habitat. The first part of this study quantifies the effects of wildfires on road erosion and road-stream connectivity as a function of fire severity and road segment characteristics. The data were collected along 6.8 km of an unpaved road after the High Park wildfire in Colorado. The second and third parts of this dissertation investigate how traffic and two road decommissioning treatments affect road sediment production and road-stream connectivity through the use of rainfall simulations, sediment production measurements at the road segment scale, and repeated surveys of 12.3 km of decommissioned roads. The segment-scale and road survey data were collected over a three-year period that included one summer prior to decommissioning and the first two years after decommissioning. The road-wildfire study indicated that road surface rill erosion increased with hillslope burn severity due to the increasing amounts of runoff, but the length and area of rilling also increased with road segment slope. Segments with a slope ≤5% tended to capture sediment from the hillslope. Road segment area was only important for roads in areas burned at low severity, indicating that hillslopes become a progressively less important source of runoff as burn severity decreases. All of the road segments in areas burned at moderate and high severity and 78% of the segments in areas burned at low severity were connected to the stream due to the increased runoff from upslope, the concentration of hillslope and road surface runoff to a single drainage point, and the reduced infiltration and trapping capacity of the hillslopes below the road. After wildfires land managers need to increase the frequency of drainage structures, and a more integrated modeling approach is needed to further our understanding of the complex interactions between burned hillslope and roads. The rainfall simulations showed that the infiltration capacity for the decommissioning treatment of only ripping had little effect on infiltration and significantly increased sediment yields compared to closed roads. Mulching after ripping doubled the final infiltration rate and decreased sediment yields by nearly a factor of five compared to only ripping. Eighty passes of an all-terrain vehicle on two closed roads had no effect on infiltration capacity, but increased sediment yields by a factor of three. The results at the road segment-scale showed that traffic was the dominant control on sediment production, and both decommissioning treatments greatly reduced road sediment production as nearly all of the eroded sediment was trapped in the furrows. Decommissioning reduced road-stream connectivity from 12% of the total length to only 2%, with most of the connected segments being immediately adjacent to a stream. These results can help calibrate and validate road erosion models, and guide the design… Advisors/Committee Members: MacDonald, Lee H. (advisor), Kampf, Stephanie (committee member), Lefsky, Michael (committee member), Butters, Gregory (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Road decommissioning; Road-stream connectivity; Wildfire; Road erosion; Rainfall simulations; Runoff

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APA (6th Edition):

Sosa Peréz, G. (2016). Road sediment production and delivery : effects of fires, traffic, and road decommissioning. (Doctoral Dissertation). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/176751

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sosa Peréz, Gabriel. “Road sediment production and delivery : effects of fires, traffic, and road decommissioning.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Colorado State University. Accessed December 14, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/176751.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sosa Peréz, Gabriel. “Road sediment production and delivery : effects of fires, traffic, and road decommissioning.” 2016. Web. 14 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Sosa Peréz G. Road sediment production and delivery : effects of fires, traffic, and road decommissioning. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2016. [cited 2019 Dec 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/176751.

Council of Science Editors:

Sosa Peréz G. Road sediment production and delivery : effects of fires, traffic, and road decommissioning. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/176751


Montana Tech

3. Grant, Ashley Stevenson. RESTORATION OF NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITIES AFTER ROAD DECOMMISSIONING: EFFECT OF SEED MIX AND SOIL PROPERTIES ON VEGETATIVE ESTABLISHMENT.

Degree: MS, 2009, Montana Tech

Road decommissioning is increasingly recognized as a critical first step in the restoration of terrestrial and aquatic habitats. In the past two years alone, the United States Congress has appropriated $90 million for road removal and watershed restoration. Despite this relatively large public investment, little is known about the efficacy or ecological effects of road-removal practices. One particularly important issue is the impact of post-road-removal revegetation strategies. This study evaluated 1) short-term effects of road decommissioning on plant community composition, 2) effects of seed-mix seed origin (native vs. nonnative), species diversity, and seeding density on vegetative establishment, and 3) impact of overstory canopy and coarse woody debris on revegetation success on recently decommissioned roads. Total vegetative cover declined by 60% one-year after decommissioning, with nonnative plants showing the greatest declines (ca. 90%). Although managers often justify the use of nonnative seed mixes by the need for rapid establishment of plants on disturbed sites, we did not find significant differences in percent cover of total vegetation between plots seeded with native versus nonnative species, one year after treatment. Furthermore, cover of native species was significantly higher on plots seeded with natives compared to other treatment plots (12.3% vs. 7.8%, respectively). On treatments seeded with nonnative species, 18% of total vegetative cover was due to cover of seeded species; in comparison, seeded species accounted for 43% of total vegetative cover on native treatments. These findings suggest that native seed mixes actually may outperform nonnative ones in terms of vegetative establishment after disturbance associated with road removal.

Subjects/Keywords: and watershed restoration; native plant restoration; nonnative seed; road decommissioning; road removal; seed establishment; soil bulk density; water holding capacity

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Grant, A. S. (2009). RESTORATION OF NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITIES AFTER ROAD DECOMMISSIONING: EFFECT OF SEED MIX AND SOIL PROPERTIES ON VEGETATIVE ESTABLISHMENT. (Masters Thesis). Montana Tech. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/835

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Grant, Ashley Stevenson. “RESTORATION OF NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITIES AFTER ROAD DECOMMISSIONING: EFFECT OF SEED MIX AND SOIL PROPERTIES ON VEGETATIVE ESTABLISHMENT.” 2009. Masters Thesis, Montana Tech. Accessed December 14, 2019. https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/835.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Grant, Ashley Stevenson. “RESTORATION OF NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITIES AFTER ROAD DECOMMISSIONING: EFFECT OF SEED MIX AND SOIL PROPERTIES ON VEGETATIVE ESTABLISHMENT.” 2009. Web. 14 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Grant AS. RESTORATION OF NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITIES AFTER ROAD DECOMMISSIONING: EFFECT OF SEED MIX AND SOIL PROPERTIES ON VEGETATIVE ESTABLISHMENT. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Montana Tech; 2009. [cited 2019 Dec 14]. Available from: https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/835.

Council of Science Editors:

Grant AS. RESTORATION OF NATIVE PLANT COMMUNITIES AFTER ROAD DECOMMISSIONING: EFFECT OF SEED MIX AND SOIL PROPERTIES ON VEGETATIVE ESTABLISHMENT. [Masters Thesis]. Montana Tech; 2009. Available from: https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/835

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