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You searched for subject:(Rhinopithecus roxellana). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Southern California

1. Liu, Xuecong. Fruticose lichens as a food source for a primate species, Rhinopithecus roxellana: nutritional analysis.

Degree: MS, Biostatistics, 2012, University of Southern California

Unlike most colobines, the Sichuan snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus roxellana) lives in temperate habitats with strong seasonality and limited plant food availability. R. roxellana mainly relied on year-round available fruticose lichens, an uncommon food source for mammals, supplemented by seasonally available plant food. Fruticose lichens were more easily digestible than plant food. Fruticose lichens contained less feeding deterrents, in particular crude fibers and condensed tannins, than all plant parts. Fruticose lichens also contained more nonstructural carbohydrates than plant leaves. In addition, energy content in fruticose lichens was equivalent to that in some food plant parts. ❧ Fruticose lichens contained less crude proteins than most plant parts. It is unknown how R. roxellana physiologically adapts to the low-protein diet. Lichens produce a range of metabolites that are unique compared to vascular plants. These metabolites have various biological actions (e.g. antibiotic and antiviral), and it is unclear whether R. roxellana eats lichens only for nutrients, or also as a mechanism of self-medication. Advisors/Committee Members: Azen, Stanley P. (Committee Chair), Stanford, Craig B. (Committee Member), Wilcox, Rand R. (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: fruticose lichens; Rhinopithecus roxellana; nutritional analysis

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APA (6th Edition):

Liu, X. (2012). Fruticose lichens as a food source for a primate species, Rhinopithecus roxellana: nutritional analysis. (Masters Thesis). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/16647/rec/2931

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Liu, Xuecong. “Fruticose lichens as a food source for a primate species, Rhinopithecus roxellana: nutritional analysis.” 2012. Masters Thesis, University of Southern California. Accessed April 10, 2021. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/16647/rec/2931.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Liu, Xuecong. “Fruticose lichens as a food source for a primate species, Rhinopithecus roxellana: nutritional analysis.” 2012. Web. 10 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Liu X. Fruticose lichens as a food source for a primate species, Rhinopithecus roxellana: nutritional analysis. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Southern California; 2012. [cited 2021 Apr 10]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/16647/rec/2931.

Council of Science Editors:

Liu X. Fruticose lichens as a food source for a primate species, Rhinopithecus roxellana: nutritional analysis. [Masters Thesis]. University of Southern California; 2012. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/16647/rec/2931


University of Southern California

2. Liu, Xuecong. Behavioral ecology of the Sichuan snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus roxellana) in Shennongjia, China.

Degree: PhD, Integrative and Evolutionary Biology, 2012, University of Southern California

The present study systematically investigated food selection, time budget, ranging patterns on two different sized wild groups, and male dispersal on a provisioned group of the Sichuan snub-nosed monkey, Rhinopithecus roxellana (Colobinae), in Shennongjia National Nature Reserve, Hubei Province, China. ❧ In general, Shennongjia forest was deciduous, and diet composition of R. roxellana well reflected the seasonal food availability. R. roxellana selected food in accordance with most colobines in terms of nutritional chemistry. Fruticose lichens were the most important food, occupying about 38.4% of the overall diet. Nutritional chemistry showed that fruticose lichens contained more nonstructural carbohydrates, and less crude fibers and plant secondary compounds than most plant parts. The easy digestibility and slow replacement of lichens may partly explain the long daily travel distance (over 1,000 m) and the large range size (over 10 km2) of R. roxellana. Food resources, including fruticose lichens, tended to be patchily distributed. The monkeys, especially adult females, in the larger group spent more time moving and less time resting than those in the smaller group, suggesting that there was some degree of feeding competition within groups, although the daily travel distance and range size were not different between two different sized groups. Male dispersal between social units within the group and between groups was common. Advisors/Committee Members: Stanford, Craig B. (Committee Chair), Delgado, Roberto A. (Committee Member), Seaman, Gary (Committee Member).

Subjects/Keywords: Rhinopithecus roxellana; food selection; time budget; ranging patterns; male dispersal

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Liu, X. (2012). Behavioral ecology of the Sichuan snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus roxellana) in Shennongjia, China. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Southern California. Retrieved from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/20768/rec/1062

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Liu, Xuecong. “Behavioral ecology of the Sichuan snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus roxellana) in Shennongjia, China.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California. Accessed April 10, 2021. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/20768/rec/1062.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Liu, Xuecong. “Behavioral ecology of the Sichuan snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus roxellana) in Shennongjia, China.” 2012. Web. 10 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Liu X. Behavioral ecology of the Sichuan snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus roxellana) in Shennongjia, China. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2012. [cited 2021 Apr 10]. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/20768/rec/1062.

Council of Science Editors:

Liu X. Behavioral ecology of the Sichuan snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus roxellana) in Shennongjia, China. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Southern California; 2012. Available from: http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll3/id/20768/rec/1062

3. Yan, Caie. Social interaction and dispersal patterns of golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana) living in multi-level societies.

Degree: PhD, 0340, 2012, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

This study aimed to explore the benefits that individuals gain from group living and the role of kin and nonkin affiliation and cooperation in the formation of social networks in primates by investigating the multi-level social structures exhibited by Sichuan snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana). The multi-level social network of snub-nosed monkeys composed of over 100 individuals, in which individuals form one-male breeding units (OMUs, which include one adult male, several adult females, and their offspring), all male units (AMUs), and bands (several OMUs that travel, feed and rest together). Given the fact that the majority of Asian colobines exhibit a harem social organization, multi-level societies of R. roxellana are proposed to have evolved through the aggregation of individual one-male groups. The specific objectives of this study are to explore 1) the social factors that help to maintain the stability of multilevel societies, 2) the benefits to individuals of forming a higher level social structure, 3) the presence and complexity of kinship networks and dispersal patterns in R. roxellana based on genetic data, and 4) the behavioral mechanisms regulating social interactions within multi-level social networks, and whether these are most consistent with kin selection theory, reciprocity theories, or biological market theory. Behavioral observations for this study were conducted at Zhouzhi National Natural Reserve, Shaanxi, China. A habituated band of snub-nosed monkeys was followed from September 2007 to August 2008. Along with behavioral observations, fecal samples were collected from the focal band and two neighboring bands. DNA was extracted from the fecal samples. The d-loop region of the mitochondrial DNA was amplified and sequenced for each sample. The behavioral data indicate that OMUs were socially and sexual independent since the majority of social and sexual interactions were restricted to members of the same OMU. Both direct affiliative and agonistic interactions between members of different OMUs were infrequent. Compared to the harems formed by other Asian colobines, the OMUs of R. roxellana were more cohesive. Leader males played a critical role in maintaining the cohesion of his OMU by actively threatening or chasing both adult and juvenile members of other OMUs that were within 5 meters of his harem. It is likely that the formation of multi-level societies in R. roxellana is the result of social and spatial tolerance among harem males in response to the foraging requirements associated with the exploitation of highly seasonal and low productive habitat. Three distinct haplotypes were found among 99 samples collected from the three neighboring bands. Based on the assumption that individuals with less frequent haplotypes represent immigrants from other bands, it was estimated that approximately 17-21% of females and 8-15% of males immigrated from neighboring bands. The genetic data also indicated that females transfer between OMUs within the same band since females with the same… Advisors/Committee Members: Garber, Paul A. (advisor), Garber, Paul A. (Committee Chair), Malhi, Ripan S. (committee member), Stumpf, Rebecca M. (committee member), Swedell, Larissa (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Rhinopithecus roxellana; snub-nosed monkey; multi-level society; social interaction; dispersal pattern; kin selection; reciprocity; biological market theory

…interactions in the Sichuan snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana). Snub-nosed… …nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus bieti, Kirkpatrick 1998, Grueter 2009; R. roxellana, Ren et… …nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus bieti, Kirkpatrick 1998, Grueter 2009; R. roxellana, Ren et… …colobines and baboons. Chapter 3. Social interactions among male and female R. roxellana Given… …societies of R. roxellana are proposed to have evolved through the aggregation of individual one… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Yan, C. (2012). Social interaction and dispersal patterns of golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana) living in multi-level societies. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2142/31175

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yan, Caie. “Social interaction and dispersal patterns of golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana) living in multi-level societies.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign. Accessed April 10, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2142/31175.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yan, Caie. “Social interaction and dispersal patterns of golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana) living in multi-level societies.” 2012. Web. 10 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Yan C. Social interaction and dispersal patterns of golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana) living in multi-level societies. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2012. [cited 2021 Apr 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/31175.

Council of Science Editors:

Yan C. Social interaction and dispersal patterns of golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana) living in multi-level societies. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/31175

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