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You searched for subject:(Repetitive head impacts). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Western Ontario

1. Harriss, Alexandra. Cumulative purposeful soccer heading can lead to compensatory changes in brain activity during combined moderate exercise and cognitive load in female youth soccer players.

Degree: 2020, University of Western Ontario

Head trauma that occurs during sporting events is responsible for an increasing number of emergency department visits in Canada and is associated with an increased risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases.While head injury in American football has been extensively studied, it cannot be extrapolated to non-helmeted sports. Approximately 265 million people are actively participating in soccer and many are 18 years of age and younger. Soccer is unique in that players use their head to redirect the ball; however, the effects of cumulative purposeful soccer heading on brain health are unknown. Accordingly, the objective of this thesis was to quantify head impact magnitudes that female youth soccer players sustain during games and evaluate their influence on electrophysiological functioning both at rest and exercise. This was achieved through three research projects that studied female youth soccer players for an entire soccer season and investigated repetitive soccer heading using methodological equipment including, game video analysis, headbands instrumented with wireless microsensors, as well as electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings. Results indicated that the median number of headers experienced during a single game was one, while the maximum is nine, and minimum is zero (Chapter 2). Furthermore, player age is positively associated with an increasing number of purposeful soccer headers, but there is no association between head impact location and game scenario (Chapter 2). Chapter 3 reveals that game scenario and head impact location significantly affect both linear head acceleration and rotational head velocity magnitudes. As an initial attempt to detect neurocognitive change (Chapter 4), EEG recordings revealed a statistically significant increase in EEG power during exercise compared to rest at each EEG frequency band (Alpha1, Alpha2, Beta1, Beta2, Theta). These differences were amplified when cumulative number of headers were considered, but only for Alpha1, Alpha2 and Beta2. In conclusion, this thesis shows cumulative soccer heading experienced by female youth soccer players could lead to neurocognitive changes after one season of soccer. Furthermore, exercise may help to reveal sub-clinical brain changes due to cumulative soccer heading that are not shown at rest. These findings can help guide data-driven approaches to improve player safety in youth soccer.

Subjects/Keywords: Adolescent; concussion; head impacts; brain injury; repetitive; girls; Sports Sciences

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APA (6th Edition):

Harriss, A. (2020). Cumulative purposeful soccer heading can lead to compensatory changes in brain activity during combined moderate exercise and cognitive load in female youth soccer players. (Thesis). University of Western Ontario. Retrieved from https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/7262

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Harriss, Alexandra. “Cumulative purposeful soccer heading can lead to compensatory changes in brain activity during combined moderate exercise and cognitive load in female youth soccer players.” 2020. Thesis, University of Western Ontario. Accessed January 16, 2021. https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/7262.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Harriss, Alexandra. “Cumulative purposeful soccer heading can lead to compensatory changes in brain activity during combined moderate exercise and cognitive load in female youth soccer players.” 2020. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Harriss A. Cumulative purposeful soccer heading can lead to compensatory changes in brain activity during combined moderate exercise and cognitive load in female youth soccer players. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Western Ontario; 2020. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/7262.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Harriss A. Cumulative purposeful soccer heading can lead to compensatory changes in brain activity during combined moderate exercise and cognitive load in female youth soccer players. [Thesis]. University of Western Ontario; 2020. Available from: https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/7262

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Boston University

2. Duncan, Kristen Marie. Characterizing the incidence of sleep disorders in a cohort of former college football players.

Degree: MS, Medical Sciences, 2020, Boston University

CTE is a progressive neurodegenerative disease defined by p-tau lesions in characteristic locations of the brain, leading to cognitive impairment as well as mood and behavioral dysfunction. Exposure to repetitive head impacts is a major risk factor for developing CTE; however, additional risk factors and secondary modulating factors, which may expand available treatment and prevention options, are still being elucidated. Studies into the glymphatic system, a system of waste clearance in the brain thought to be activated during sleep, have implicated glymphatic dysfunction in the clearance of toxic proteins like amyloid-beta and hyperphosphorylated tau, as well as in cognitive decline in neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer’s Disease, bringing into question whether sleep, through impacting glymphatic clearance, may act as a modulating factor in the development of CTE. In the present study, we began to characterize the presence of sleep disorders and their co-morbid conditions in a cohort of former college football players to gain better insight into their prevalence and the health outcomes of those with sleep conditions. Our results found higher rates of sleep apnea in the study sample, as well as an association between diagnosis with sleep apnea and diagnosis with dementia, AD, MCI, CTE, and similar disorders. Sleep apnea was significantly associated with depression, anxiety, high cholesterol, and diabetes. Further research into whether sleep disorders exacerbate CTE pathology or clinical symptoms, and whether treatment of sleep symptoms leads to better outcomes for patients with CTE, is necessary to further elucidate a potential connection. Advisors/Committee Members: Stern, Robert A. (advisor), Alosco, Michael (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Neurosciences; Chronic traumatic encephalopathy; CTE; Dementia; Insomnia; Repetitive head impacts; Sleep disorders

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Duncan, K. M. (2020). Characterizing the incidence of sleep disorders in a cohort of former college football players. (Masters Thesis). Boston University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2144/41216

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Duncan, Kristen Marie. “Characterizing the incidence of sleep disorders in a cohort of former college football players.” 2020. Masters Thesis, Boston University. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/2144/41216.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Duncan, Kristen Marie. “Characterizing the incidence of sleep disorders in a cohort of former college football players.” 2020. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Duncan KM. Characterizing the incidence of sleep disorders in a cohort of former college football players. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Boston University; 2020. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2144/41216.

Council of Science Editors:

Duncan KM. Characterizing the incidence of sleep disorders in a cohort of former college football players. [Masters Thesis]. Boston University; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2144/41216

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