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You searched for subject:(Regionalism Ontario). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Ryerson University

1. Goodbrand, Hannah. Regionalization of Immigrant Settlement in Ontario Exploring Experiences of Small and Medium Sized Reception Centres.

Degree: 2016, Ryerson University

This paper explores the regionalization of immigrant settlement in Canada’s smaller cities which has not been sufficiently addressed in Canada’s largest province, Ontario. The paper investigates this through a comprehensive review of the existing Canadian literature and research into the changing volume of immigrant settlement and the social geography of Ontario’s smaller cities from 1996 to 2015. This research is conducted through the development of a categorization system which orders Ontario’s CMAs into tiers based on total immigrant population. Two tiers are then compared to reveal any general trends or anomalies which could contribute to the understanding of regionalization in Ontario. A lack of evidence for significant regionalization was found, however, growth in the visible minority populations of some CMAs suggested the development of new international migration pathways. The findings of this paper reaffirm the need for further research in immigrant settlement in smaller Canadian cities. Advisors/Committee Members: Ghos, Sutama (Thesis advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Immigrants  – Government policy  – Ontario; Small cities  – Ontario; Ontario  – Emigration and Immigration  – Government policy; Social integration  – Ontario; Regionalism  – Ontario

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Goodbrand, H. (2016). Regionalization of Immigrant Settlement in Ontario Exploring Experiences of Small and Medium Sized Reception Centres. (Thesis). Ryerson University. Retrieved from https://digital.library.ryerson.ca/islandora/object/RULA%3A5592

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Goodbrand, Hannah. “Regionalization of Immigrant Settlement in Ontario Exploring Experiences of Small and Medium Sized Reception Centres.” 2016. Thesis, Ryerson University. Accessed November 18, 2019. https://digital.library.ryerson.ca/islandora/object/RULA%3A5592.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Goodbrand, Hannah. “Regionalization of Immigrant Settlement in Ontario Exploring Experiences of Small and Medium Sized Reception Centres.” 2016. Web. 18 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Goodbrand H. Regionalization of Immigrant Settlement in Ontario Exploring Experiences of Small and Medium Sized Reception Centres. [Internet] [Thesis]. Ryerson University; 2016. [cited 2019 Nov 18]. Available from: https://digital.library.ryerson.ca/islandora/object/RULA%3A5592.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Goodbrand H. Regionalization of Immigrant Settlement in Ontario Exploring Experiences of Small and Medium Sized Reception Centres. [Thesis]. Ryerson University; 2016. Available from: https://digital.library.ryerson.ca/islandora/object/RULA%3A5592

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Laurentian University

2. Blais, Maxine. Northern Ontario camp informing architecture .

Degree: 2019, Laurentian University

This thesis explores the idea of Camp in Northern Ontario and how it can inform architecture in the region. The work examines Camp through four categories: History, Community, Placemaking, and Sentiment. Six types of camps are analysed through drawing and text, which is based on personal experience, and through text-based research. A set of site and building design guidelines are developed from this analysis. A speculative cohousing project at Whitewater Lake in Azilda, Ontario, is chosen as an architectural typology and site to test an architecture informed by Camp. Using these design guidelines, the cohousing project contributes to maintaining a sense of place through its history and its making processes, providing a shared sense of community and creating a sentiment that is rooted in the collective memory of Camp. The final result indicates what an architectural regionalism can mean for Northern Ontario and how it will improve the way people interact with their built environment and communities.

Subjects/Keywords: Northern Ontario; camp; camping; architecture; vernacular; placemaking; regionalism; cohousing

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Blais, M. (2019). Northern Ontario camp informing architecture . (Thesis). Laurentian University. Retrieved from https://zone.biblio.laurentian.ca/handle/10219/3251

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Blais, Maxine. “Northern Ontario camp informing architecture .” 2019. Thesis, Laurentian University. Accessed November 18, 2019. https://zone.biblio.laurentian.ca/handle/10219/3251.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Blais, Maxine. “Northern Ontario camp informing architecture .” 2019. Web. 18 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Blais M. Northern Ontario camp informing architecture . [Internet] [Thesis]. Laurentian University; 2019. [cited 2019 Nov 18]. Available from: https://zone.biblio.laurentian.ca/handle/10219/3251.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Blais M. Northern Ontario camp informing architecture . [Thesis]. Laurentian University; 2019. Available from: https://zone.biblio.laurentian.ca/handle/10219/3251

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Ryerson University

3. Lishak, Ekaterina. Fragments: A Poetic Approach To Place-Making.

Degree: 2017, Ryerson University

The notion of regional particularity and sensitivity to place remains in constant struggle with the persistent autonomous approach evident in most contemporary architecture, which under the pressures of globalization has paved the path toward commodification and the creation of universal non-places. Meanwhile the decline of craftsmanship within architecture and the perpetual emphasis on visual images and iconic forms continues to undermine human connection to the built environment. The use of Fragments in architectural design involves a distinct understanding of perception of space that takes its theoretical basis in the communicative and situational character of Synthetic Cubism and Picturesque Landscape theory. Brought into an architectural context, these theories work in contrast to the rational approach based on proportion and perspectival imagery, bringing focus towards the experience of the body moving through space with emphasis on the poetics of construction, materiality, corporeal experience, and details that express craftsmanship, meaning, and emotion. Guided by Kenneth Frampton’s theory of Critical Regionalism with the aim of resisting placelessness, the nature of such tectonic articulation is informed by the context and specificity of a site. Advisors/Committee Members: Polo, Marco (Thesis advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Space (Architecture)  – Ontario  – Toronto; Architecture and society; Dufferin Grove-Bickford Park (Toronto, Ont.); Historicism in architecture; Architecture  – Human factors.; Regionalism in architecture  – Ontario  – Toronto

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lishak, E. (2017). Fragments: A Poetic Approach To Place-Making. (Thesis). Ryerson University. Retrieved from https://digital.library.ryerson.ca/islandora/object/RULA%3A6963

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lishak, Ekaterina. “Fragments: A Poetic Approach To Place-Making.” 2017. Thesis, Ryerson University. Accessed November 18, 2019. https://digital.library.ryerson.ca/islandora/object/RULA%3A6963.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lishak, Ekaterina. “Fragments: A Poetic Approach To Place-Making.” 2017. Web. 18 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Lishak E. Fragments: A Poetic Approach To Place-Making. [Internet] [Thesis]. Ryerson University; 2017. [cited 2019 Nov 18]. Available from: https://digital.library.ryerson.ca/islandora/object/RULA%3A6963.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Lishak E. Fragments: A Poetic Approach To Place-Making. [Thesis]. Ryerson University; 2017. Available from: https://digital.library.ryerson.ca/islandora/object/RULA%3A6963

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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