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You searched for subject:(Rectal administration). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Florida

1. Egelund, Eric Free. Pharmacokinetics of Rifampin and Cyclo-Pentyl Rifampin (Rifapentine) in Elephant and Man.

Degree: PhD, Pharmaceutical Sciences - Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research, 2014, University of Florida

The rifamycins have been an integral part of tuberculosis treatment since the approval of rifampin by the Food and Drug Administration in 1971. The inclusion of Advisors/Committee Members: PELOQUIN,CHARLES A (committee chair), FRYE,REGINALD F (committee member), LAUZARDO,MICHAEL (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Dosage; Drug design; Medication administration; Medications; Modeling; Pharmacokinetics; Plasmas; Rectal administration; Rifamycins; Tuberculosis; elephant  – human  – rifampin  – rifapentine  – tuberculosis

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Egelund, E. F. (2014). Pharmacokinetics of Rifampin and Cyclo-Pentyl Rifampin (Rifapentine) in Elephant and Man. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Florida. Retrieved from https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0046557

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Egelund, Eric Free. “Pharmacokinetics of Rifampin and Cyclo-Pentyl Rifampin (Rifapentine) in Elephant and Man.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Florida. Accessed April 18, 2021. https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0046557.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Egelund, Eric Free. “Pharmacokinetics of Rifampin and Cyclo-Pentyl Rifampin (Rifapentine) in Elephant and Man.” 2014. Web. 18 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Egelund EF. Pharmacokinetics of Rifampin and Cyclo-Pentyl Rifampin (Rifapentine) in Elephant and Man. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Florida; 2014. [cited 2021 Apr 18]. Available from: https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0046557.

Council of Science Editors:

Egelund EF. Pharmacokinetics of Rifampin and Cyclo-Pentyl Rifampin (Rifapentine) in Elephant and Man. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Florida; 2014. Available from: https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0046557


University of Florida

2. Patel, Shreena. Effects of Analgesics on Pre- and Post-Separator Pain.

Degree: MS, Dental Sciences - Dentistry, 2008, University of Florida

Pain with orthodontic appliances plays a role in treatment acceptance and compliance. The literature, however, is inconclusive as to the preferred analgesic drug for management of orthodontic pain. Although most conclude that ibuprofen is an effective analgesic for mild to moderate pain associated with orthodontics, there is evidence in support of naproxen sodium and acetaminophen. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of three different analgesics (ibuprofen, naproxen sodium, and acetaminophen) administered prior to and after placement of separators, in reducing the incidence and severity of post-separator placement pain. The study also assessed the effectiveness of placebo administration, as well as the contribution of psychological factors and gender to the pain experience. Twenty-four non-orthodontic patients, 13 male and 11 female, participated in the study. Each subject randomly received one of four treatments: ibuprofen, naproxen sodium, acetaminophen or placebo. The dosing times were 1 hour prior to separator placement and 3 and 7 hours after separator placement. Prior to separator placement, subjects completed a State and Trait Anxiety Inventory, Positive Affect Negative Affect Schedule, a Masticatory Efficiency Test, and a Visual Analog Scale for expected pain and pain experienced with the Masticatory Efficiency Test. A pain dairy was kept for 24 hours. Subjects returned to the clinic after one week for separator removal. This protocol was followed twice more, at monthly intervals. By the end of the three months, each subject received three of the four treatments. The order of treatment drugs administered was randomized. Based on mixed model analyses (p < 0.05), pain following separators was significantly related to the treatment drug and the time following separator placement. Administering ibuprofen pre- and post- separator placement significantly reduced pain compared with placebo. The analgesic effects diminished by day 2, resulting in peak pain levels and decreased chewing efficiency at this time. The expected pain also played a role in experienced pain; subjects who expected more pain also reported more pain. ( en ) Advisors/Committee Members: Wheeler, Timothy T. (committee chair), Yezierski, Robert P. (committee member), Fillingim, Roger B. (committee member), McGorray, Susan P. (committee member), Logan, Henrietta N. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Analgesics; Dosage; Mastication; Orthodontics; Orthods; Pain; Placebos; Rectal administration; Separators; Sodium; analgesics, drugs, ibuprofen, nsaids, orthodontics, pain, placement, post, pre, separators

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Patel, S. (2008). Effects of Analgesics on Pre- and Post-Separator Pain. (Masters Thesis). University of Florida. Retrieved from https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022167

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Patel, Shreena. “Effects of Analgesics on Pre- and Post-Separator Pain.” 2008. Masters Thesis, University of Florida. Accessed April 18, 2021. https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022167.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Patel, Shreena. “Effects of Analgesics on Pre- and Post-Separator Pain.” 2008. Web. 18 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Patel S. Effects of Analgesics on Pre- and Post-Separator Pain. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Florida; 2008. [cited 2021 Apr 18]. Available from: https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022167.

Council of Science Editors:

Patel S. Effects of Analgesics on Pre- and Post-Separator Pain. [Masters Thesis]. University of Florida; 2008. Available from: https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022167


University of Florida

3. Raiff, Bethany R. Effects of Nicotine on Responding Maintained by Environmental Stimuli in Rats.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2008, University of Florida

Past research suggests that nicotine-induced increases in reinforced responding are due to its reinforcer-enhancing effects. It is unclear whether this role is specific to certain kinds of reinforcing consequences (e.g., sensory stimuli, edible reinforcers, drug reinforcers). Furthermore, it is possible that nicotine merely increases behavior that has been trained in the past (i.e., responding reinforced with food consequences). The objectives of Experiments 1 and 2 were to test the generality of the motivating establishing operation (MEO) account of nicotine-induced increases in reinforced responding and to determine whether the history of training (responses that have previously been reinforced with food versus those that have not) would augment the effects. Experiment 1 used an observing response procedure to investigate responding maintained by food reinforcers, conditioned reinforcers (i.e., visual stimuli), and responding during extinction. Rats in Experiment 1 received pre-session subcutaneous injections of vehicle (n = 5), 0.3 (n = 6) or 0.56 (n = 6) mg/kg nicotine for 70 sessions. Resistance to extinction was also assessed by removing food for five sessions. Nicotine did not consistently affect food or extinction responding. Both doses of nicotine produced increases in responding maintained by conditioned reinforcers, but did not increase resistance to extinction. Pre-drug response rates accounted for a small but significant percentage of the variance in the drug effect. In Experiment 1, contingent houselight presentations alone were shown to slightly increase response rates from operant levels. Experiment 2 further evaluated the putative primary reinforcing functions of turning on and turning off a houselight. One group of rats (n=4) was initially trained to press both levers (one was later designated as the active lever and the other the inactive lever), while a different group of rats (n =4) was only trained to press the lever that was later designated as the active lever. Across two phases, five responses on the active lever resulted in the houselight either turning on (Lights On) or turning off (Lights Off). All subjects made more responses on the active lever, regardless of lever training history and the type of stimulus change, suggesting that both stimuli served as primary reinforcers. Nicotine only increased responding on the active lever, again regardless of lever training history, which further supported the MEO role, and refuted the alternative hypothesis that nicotine generally increases behavior that has been trained. Although there was a tendency for nicotine to increase low pre-drug response rates in both experiments, nicotine systematically increased responding maintained by conditioned reinforcers in Experiment 1, and only increased responding on an active lever in Experiment 2. The results of both experiments are in accord with the MEO account of nicotine; that it increases responding maintained by moderately reinforcing stimuli, such as the conditioned reinforcers and visual stimuli used… Advisors/Committee Members: Dallery, Jesse (committee chair), Hackenberg, Timothy D. (committee member), Branch, Marc N. (committee member), Rowland, Neil E. (committee member), Bruijnzeel, Adriaan Willem (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Cocaine; Drug evaluation; Medication administration; Mental stimulation; Pharmacology; Psychopharmacology; Rats; Rectal administration; Response rates; Visual stimuli; conditioned, establishing, extinction, food, lights, nicotine, observing, rats, reinforcement, resistance, stimuli

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Raiff, B. R. (2008). Effects of Nicotine on Responding Maintained by Environmental Stimuli in Rats. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Florida. Retrieved from https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022040

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Raiff, Bethany R. “Effects of Nicotine on Responding Maintained by Environmental Stimuli in Rats.” 2008. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Florida. Accessed April 18, 2021. https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022040.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Raiff, Bethany R. “Effects of Nicotine on Responding Maintained by Environmental Stimuli in Rats.” 2008. Web. 18 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Raiff BR. Effects of Nicotine on Responding Maintained by Environmental Stimuli in Rats. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Florida; 2008. [cited 2021 Apr 18]. Available from: https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022040.

Council of Science Editors:

Raiff BR. Effects of Nicotine on Responding Maintained by Environmental Stimuli in Rats. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Florida; 2008. Available from: https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0022040

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