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Degree: Immunology and Microbiology

You searched for subject:(Reconnaissance des soci t s trang res). Showing records 1 – 30 of 52 total matches.

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1. Prince, Amanda L. The Role of Inducible T Cell Kinase (Itk) in the Development of Innate T Cells and in the Formation of Protective Memory Responses: A Dissertation.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Pathology, 2013, U of Massachusetts : Med

T cell development in the thymus produces multiple lineages of cells, including conventional naïve CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, regulatory T cells, and innate… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; Innate Immunity; CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes; Immunity

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APA (6th Edition):

Prince, A. L. (2013). The Role of Inducible T Cell Kinase (Itk) in the Development of Innate T Cells and in the Formation of Protective Memory Responses: A Dissertation. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/660

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Prince, Amanda L. “The Role of Inducible T Cell Kinase (Itk) in the Development of Innate T Cells and in the Formation of Protective Memory Responses: A Dissertation.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/660.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Prince, Amanda L. “The Role of Inducible T Cell Kinase (Itk) in the Development of Innate T Cells and in the Formation of Protective Memory Responses: A Dissertation.” 2013. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Prince AL. The Role of Inducible T Cell Kinase (Itk) in the Development of Innate T Cells and in the Formation of Protective Memory Responses: A Dissertation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2013. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/660.

Council of Science Editors:

Prince AL. The Role of Inducible T Cell Kinase (Itk) in the Development of Innate T Cells and in the Formation of Protective Memory Responses: A Dissertation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2013. Available from: http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/660

2. Narayan, Kavitha. The Function of Innate γδ T Cell Subsets is Molecularly Programmed in the Thymus in Three Stages: A Dissertation.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Pathology, 2011, U of Massachusetts : Med

  The immune system generates discrete lineages of cells that are designed to respond optimally to environmental cues and infectious agents. Two distinct lineages of… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Immunity; Innate; T-Lymphocytes; T-Lymphocyte Subsets; Genes; T-Cell Receptor; Cells; Genetic Phenomena; Hemic and Immune Systems; Immunology and Infectious Disease

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APA (6th Edition):

Narayan, K. (2011). The Function of Innate γδ T Cell Subsets is Molecularly Programmed in the Thymus in Three Stages: A Dissertation. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/527

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Narayan, Kavitha. “The Function of Innate γδ T Cell Subsets is Molecularly Programmed in the Thymus in Three Stages: A Dissertation.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/527.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Narayan, Kavitha. “The Function of Innate γδ T Cell Subsets is Molecularly Programmed in the Thymus in Three Stages: A Dissertation.” 2011. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Narayan K. The Function of Innate γδ T Cell Subsets is Molecularly Programmed in the Thymus in Three Stages: A Dissertation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2011. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/527.

Council of Science Editors:

Narayan K. The Function of Innate γδ T Cell Subsets is Molecularly Programmed in the Thymus in Three Stages: A Dissertation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2011. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/527

3. Kenney, Laurie L. The Role of Heterologous Immunity in Viral Co-Infections and Neonatal Immunity: A Dissertation.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Pathology, 2013, U of Massachusetts : Med

  The dynamics of T cell responses have been extensively studied during single virus infection of naïve mice. During a viral infection, viral antigen is… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Heterologous Immunity; Adaptive Immunity; Cross Reactions; T-Lymphocytes; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes; Coinfection; Immunity; Immunology of Infectious Disease; Immunopathology

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APA (6th Edition):

Kenney, L. L. (2013). The Role of Heterologous Immunity in Viral Co-Infections and Neonatal Immunity: A Dissertation. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/673

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kenney, Laurie L. “The Role of Heterologous Immunity in Viral Co-Infections and Neonatal Immunity: A Dissertation.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/673.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kenney, Laurie L. “The Role of Heterologous Immunity in Viral Co-Infections and Neonatal Immunity: A Dissertation.” 2013. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Kenney LL. The Role of Heterologous Immunity in Viral Co-Infections and Neonatal Immunity: A Dissertation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2013. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/673.

Council of Science Editors:

Kenney LL. The Role of Heterologous Immunity in Viral Co-Infections and Neonatal Immunity: A Dissertation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2013. Available from: http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/673

4. Jacques, Miye K. Role of Tim3 in Mediating T Cell Exhaustion During Chronic Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Microbiology and Physiological Systems, 2017, U of Massachusetts : Med

  Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. One third of the population is estimated to be infected, however only… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Tuberculosis; T cell exhaustion; TIM3; Immunology of Infectious Disease

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APA (6th Edition):

Jacques, M. K. (2017). Role of Tim3 in Mediating T Cell Exhaustion During Chronic Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection. (Masters Thesis). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/912

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jacques, Miye K. “Role of Tim3 in Mediating T Cell Exhaustion During Chronic Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection.” 2017. Masters Thesis, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/912.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jacques, Miye K. “Role of Tim3 in Mediating T Cell Exhaustion During Chronic Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection.” 2017. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Jacques MK. Role of Tim3 in Mediating T Cell Exhaustion During Chronic Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2017. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/912.

Council of Science Editors:

Jacques MK. Role of Tim3 in Mediating T Cell Exhaustion During Chronic Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection. [Masters Thesis]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2017. Available from: http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/912

5. Yin, Liusong. Studies of HLA-DM in Antigen Presentation and CD4+ T Cell Epitope Selection: A Dissertation.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Pathology, 2014, U of Massachusetts : Med

  Antigen presented to CD4+ T cells by major histocompatibility complex class II molecules (MHCII) plays a key role in adaptive immunity. Antigen presentation is… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Histocompatibility Antigens Class II; Antigen Presentation; T-Lymphocyte Epitopes; CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes; B-Lymphocytes; Vaccinia virus; Immunity; Immunology of Infectious Disease; Virology

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APA (6th Edition):

Yin, L. (2014). Studies of HLA-DM in Antigen Presentation and CD4+ T Cell Epitope Selection: A Dissertation. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/700

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yin, Liusong. “Studies of HLA-DM in Antigen Presentation and CD4+ T Cell Epitope Selection: A Dissertation.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/700.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yin, Liusong. “Studies of HLA-DM in Antigen Presentation and CD4+ T Cell Epitope Selection: A Dissertation.” 2014. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Yin L. Studies of HLA-DM in Antigen Presentation and CD4+ T Cell Epitope Selection: A Dissertation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2014. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/700.

Council of Science Editors:

Yin L. Studies of HLA-DM in Antigen Presentation and CD4+ T Cell Epitope Selection: A Dissertation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2014. Available from: http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/700

6. Nayar, Ribhu. IRF4 Does the Balancing Act: A Dissertation.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Pathology, 2015, U of Massachusetts : Med

  CD8+ T cell differentiation is a complex process that requires integration of signals from the TCR, co-stimulatory molecules and cytokines. Ligation of the peptide-MHC… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Interferon Regulatory Factors; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes; Cell Differentiation; Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus; T Cell Transcription Factor 1; Cellular and Molecular Physiology; Immunity; Immunology of Infectious Disease

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APA (6th Edition):

Nayar, R. (2015). IRF4 Does the Balancing Act: A Dissertation. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/746

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nayar, Ribhu. “IRF4 Does the Balancing Act: A Dissertation.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/746.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nayar, Ribhu. “IRF4 Does the Balancing Act: A Dissertation.” 2015. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Nayar R. IRF4 Does the Balancing Act: A Dissertation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2015. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/746.

Council of Science Editors:

Nayar R. IRF4 Does the Balancing Act: A Dissertation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2015. Available from: http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/746

7. Chen, Alex T. Regulation of Immune Pathogenesis by Antigen-Specific CD8 T Cells Following Sequential Heterologous Infections: A Dissertation.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Pathology, 2010, U of Massachusetts : Med

  Previously, our lab demonstrated that heterologous immunity could result in either gain or loss of protective immunity and alteration in immune pathology following infection… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes; Immune System; Immunity; Immunologic Memory; T-Lymphocyte Subsets; Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus; Pichinde virus; Cells; Hemic and Immune Systems; Immunology and Infectious Disease; Pathology; Viruses

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APA (6th Edition):

Chen, A. T. (2010). Regulation of Immune Pathogenesis by Antigen-Specific CD8 T Cells Following Sequential Heterologous Infections: A Dissertation. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/489

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chen, Alex T. “Regulation of Immune Pathogenesis by Antigen-Specific CD8 T Cells Following Sequential Heterologous Infections: A Dissertation.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/489.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chen, Alex T. “Regulation of Immune Pathogenesis by Antigen-Specific CD8 T Cells Following Sequential Heterologous Infections: A Dissertation.” 2010. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Chen AT. Regulation of Immune Pathogenesis by Antigen-Specific CD8 T Cells Following Sequential Heterologous Infections: A Dissertation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2010. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/489.

Council of Science Editors:

Chen AT. Regulation of Immune Pathogenesis by Antigen-Specific CD8 T Cells Following Sequential Heterologous Infections: A Dissertation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2010. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/489

8. Durost, Philip A. Evaluation of IL2 and HLA on the Homeostasis and Function of Human CD4 and CD8 T Cells.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Molecular Medicine, 2017, U of Massachusetts : Med

  Homeostasis of human T cells is regulated by many factors that control proliferation, differentiation of effector cells and generation of memory. Our current knowledge… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: IL-2; HLA; Treg; T cell; CD4; CD8; GVHD; AAV8; gene therapy; Immunity

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APA (6th Edition):

Durost, P. A. (2017). Evaluation of IL2 and HLA on the Homeostasis and Function of Human CD4 and CD8 T Cells. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/936

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Durost, Philip A. “Evaluation of IL2 and HLA on the Homeostasis and Function of Human CD4 and CD8 T Cells.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/936.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Durost, Philip A. “Evaluation of IL2 and HLA on the Homeostasis and Function of Human CD4 and CD8 T Cells.” 2017. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Durost PA. Evaluation of IL2 and HLA on the Homeostasis and Function of Human CD4 and CD8 T Cells. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2017. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/936.

Council of Science Editors:

Durost PA. Evaluation of IL2 and HLA on the Homeostasis and Function of Human CD4 and CD8 T Cells. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2017. Available from: http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/936

9. Olesin, Elizabeth A. Transcriptional Regulation of Effector and Memory Responses during Acute and Chronic Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus (LCMV) Infection.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Pathology, 2018, U of Massachusetts : Med

  Transcriptional regulation of CD8+ T cell differentiation during acute and chronic viral infections is an intricate web made up of many of transcription factors.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: LCMV; Memory; Effector; CD8; T Cell; Runx2; IRF4; Viral Infection; Immunology of Infectious Disease

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APA (6th Edition):

Olesin, E. A. (2018). Transcriptional Regulation of Effector and Memory Responses during Acute and Chronic Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus (LCMV) Infection. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/1000

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Olesin, Elizabeth A. “Transcriptional Regulation of Effector and Memory Responses during Acute and Chronic Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus (LCMV) Infection.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/1000.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Olesin, Elizabeth A. “Transcriptional Regulation of Effector and Memory Responses during Acute and Chronic Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus (LCMV) Infection.” 2018. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Olesin EA. Transcriptional Regulation of Effector and Memory Responses during Acute and Chronic Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus (LCMV) Infection. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2018. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/1000.

Council of Science Editors:

Olesin EA. Transcriptional Regulation of Effector and Memory Responses during Acute and Chronic Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus (LCMV) Infection. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2018. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/1000

10. Che, Jenny Wun-Yue. Heterologous Immunity and T Cell Stability During Viral Infections: A Dissertation.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Pathology, 2014, U of Massachusetts : Med

  The immune response to an infection is determined by a number of factors, which also affect the generation of memory T cells afterwards. The… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Heterologous Immunity; Viral Antigens; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes; Immunologic Memory; Viruses; Immunity; Immunology of Infectious Disease; Virology

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APA (6th Edition):

Che, J. W. (2014). Heterologous Immunity and T Cell Stability During Viral Infections: A Dissertation. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/697

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Che, Jenny Wun-Yue. “Heterologous Immunity and T Cell Stability During Viral Infections: A Dissertation.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/697.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Che, Jenny Wun-Yue. “Heterologous Immunity and T Cell Stability During Viral Infections: A Dissertation.” 2014. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Che JW. Heterologous Immunity and T Cell Stability During Viral Infections: A Dissertation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2014. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/697.

Council of Science Editors:

Che JW. Heterologous Immunity and T Cell Stability During Viral Infections: A Dissertation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2014. Available from: http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/697

11. Kapoor, Varun N. Tissue-dependent T Cell Apoptosis and Transcriptional Regulation of Memory CD8+T Cell Differentiation During Viral Infections: A Dissertation.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Pathology, 2013, U of Massachusetts : Med

  Activation and proliferation of antigen-specific T cells is the hallmark of an anti-viral immune response. Effector T cells generated during an immune response are… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes; Cell Survival; Cell Differentiation; Adaptive Immunity; Immunologic Memory; Immunity; Immunology of Infectious Disease

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APA (6th Edition):

Kapoor, V. N. (2013). Tissue-dependent T Cell Apoptosis and Transcriptional Regulation of Memory CD8+T Cell Differentiation During Viral Infections: A Dissertation. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/691

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kapoor, Varun N. “Tissue-dependent T Cell Apoptosis and Transcriptional Regulation of Memory CD8+T Cell Differentiation During Viral Infections: A Dissertation.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/691.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kapoor, Varun N. “Tissue-dependent T Cell Apoptosis and Transcriptional Regulation of Memory CD8+T Cell Differentiation During Viral Infections: A Dissertation.” 2013. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Kapoor VN. Tissue-dependent T Cell Apoptosis and Transcriptional Regulation of Memory CD8+T Cell Differentiation During Viral Infections: A Dissertation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2013. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/691.

Council of Science Editors:

Kapoor VN. Tissue-dependent T Cell Apoptosis and Transcriptional Regulation of Memory CD8+T Cell Differentiation During Viral Infections: A Dissertation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2013. Available from: http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/691

12. Urban, Stina L. The Role of Signal 3 Cytokine Timing in CD8 T Cell Activation: A Dissertation.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Pathology, 2015, U of Massachusetts : Med

  During an acute virus infection, antigen-specific CD8 T cells undergo clonal expansion and differentiation into effector cells in order to control the infection. Efficient… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes; Cytokines; Interleukin-12; Lymphocyte Activation; Interferon Type I; Immunology and Infectious Disease

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APA (6th Edition):

Urban, S. L. (2015). The Role of Signal 3 Cytokine Timing in CD8 T Cell Activation: A Dissertation. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/788

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Urban, Stina L. “The Role of Signal 3 Cytokine Timing in CD8 T Cell Activation: A Dissertation.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/788.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Urban, Stina L. “The Role of Signal 3 Cytokine Timing in CD8 T Cell Activation: A Dissertation.” 2015. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Urban SL. The Role of Signal 3 Cytokine Timing in CD8 T Cell Activation: A Dissertation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2015. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/788.

Council of Science Editors:

Urban SL. The Role of Signal 3 Cytokine Timing in CD8 T Cell Activation: A Dissertation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2015. Available from: http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/788

13. Mathew, Anuja. Human T Cell Responses to Dengue Virus Infections: CD8+CTL and Acute Immunosuppression: a Dissertation.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Medicine, 1999, U of Massachusetts : Med

  There are four serotypes of dengue virus designated dengue 1, 2, 3 and 4 (D1, D2, D3 and D4) and epidemiological studies indicate that… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Dengue Virus; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes; T-Lymphocytes; Cytotoxic; Immunosuppression; Cells; Hemic and Immune Systems; Investigative Techniques; Therapeutics; Virus Diseases; Viruses

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APA (6th Edition):

Mathew, A. (1999). Human T Cell Responses to Dengue Virus Infections: CD8+CTL and Acute Immunosuppression: a Dissertation. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/18

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mathew, Anuja. “Human T Cell Responses to Dengue Virus Infections: CD8+CTL and Acute Immunosuppression: a Dissertation.” 1999. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/18.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mathew, Anuja. “Human T Cell Responses to Dengue Virus Infections: CD8+CTL and Acute Immunosuppression: a Dissertation.” 1999. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Mathew A. Human T Cell Responses to Dengue Virus Infections: CD8+CTL and Acute Immunosuppression: a Dissertation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 1999. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/18.

Council of Science Editors:

Mathew A. Human T Cell Responses to Dengue Virus Infections: CD8+CTL and Acute Immunosuppression: a Dissertation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 1999. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/18

14. Malhotra, Nidhi. Distinct Gene Circuits Control the Differentiation of Innate Versus Adaptive IL-17 Producing T Cells: A Dissertation.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Pathology, 2012, U of Massachusetts : Med

T lymphocytes are distinguished by the expression of αβ TCR or γδ TCR on their cell surface. The kinetic differences in the effector functions… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cell Differentiation; Interleukin-17; T-Lymphocytes; Th17 Cells; Genes; T-Cell Receptor; Smad2 Protein; Transforming Growth Factor beta; Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins; Biological Factors; Cell and Developmental Biology; Cells; Genetic Phenomena; Hemic and Immune Systems; Immunology and Infectious Disease

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APA (6th Edition):

Malhotra, N. (2012). Distinct Gene Circuits Control the Differentiation of Innate Versus Adaptive IL-17 Producing T Cells: A Dissertation. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/579

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Malhotra, Nidhi. “Distinct Gene Circuits Control the Differentiation of Innate Versus Adaptive IL-17 Producing T Cells: A Dissertation.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/579.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Malhotra, Nidhi. “Distinct Gene Circuits Control the Differentiation of Innate Versus Adaptive IL-17 Producing T Cells: A Dissertation.” 2012. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Malhotra N. Distinct Gene Circuits Control the Differentiation of Innate Versus Adaptive IL-17 Producing T Cells: A Dissertation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2012. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/579.

Council of Science Editors:

Malhotra N. Distinct Gene Circuits Control the Differentiation of Innate Versus Adaptive IL-17 Producing T Cells: A Dissertation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2012. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/579

15. Scott, Zachary Aaron. T Cell Immunity and HIV-1 Replication in Vertically-Infected Infants and Children: A Dissertation.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Molecular Medicine, 2003, U of Massachusetts : Med

  Virus-specific cellular immune responses have been shown to be important in the control of viral replication in several animal and human virus models. Cells… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes; Infant; Child; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes; HIV-1; T-Lymphocytes; Cells; Environmental Public Health; Hemic and Immune Systems; Investigative Techniques; Maternal and Child Health; Therapeutics; Viruses

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APA (6th Edition):

Scott, Z. A. (2003). T Cell Immunity and HIV-1 Replication in Vertically-Infected Infants and Children: A Dissertation. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/71

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Scott, Zachary Aaron. “T Cell Immunity and HIV-1 Replication in Vertically-Infected Infants and Children: A Dissertation.” 2003. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/71.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Scott, Zachary Aaron. “T Cell Immunity and HIV-1 Replication in Vertically-Infected Infants and Children: A Dissertation.” 2003. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Scott ZA. T Cell Immunity and HIV-1 Replication in Vertically-Infected Infants and Children: A Dissertation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2003. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/71.

Council of Science Editors:

Scott ZA. T Cell Immunity and HIV-1 Replication in Vertically-Infected Infants and Children: A Dissertation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2003. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/71

16. Melichar, Heather J. SOX13, A γδ T Cell-Specific Gene, Is a WNT-Signaling Antagonist Regulating T Cell Development: A Dissertation.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Pathology, 2006, U of Massachusetts : Med

  Mature αβ and γδ T cells arise from a common precursor population in the thymus. Much debate has focused on the mechanism of T(more)

Subjects/Keywords: T-Lymphocytes; Genes; T-Cell Receptor gamma; Genes; T-Cell Receptor delta; Stem Cells; Cell Differentiation; Autoantigens; High Mobility Group Proteins; Transcription Factors; Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins; Cells; Genetic Phenomena; Hemic and Immune Systems

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APA (6th Edition):

Melichar, H. J. (2006). SOX13, A γδ T Cell-Specific Gene, Is a WNT-Signaling Antagonist Regulating T Cell Development: A Dissertation. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/251

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Melichar, Heather J. “SOX13, A γδ T Cell-Specific Gene, Is a WNT-Signaling Antagonist Regulating T Cell Development: A Dissertation.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/251.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Melichar, Heather J. “SOX13, A γδ T Cell-Specific Gene, Is a WNT-Signaling Antagonist Regulating T Cell Development: A Dissertation.” 2006. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Melichar HJ. SOX13, A γδ T Cell-Specific Gene, Is a WNT-Signaling Antagonist Regulating T Cell Development: A Dissertation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2006. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/251.

Council of Science Editors:

Melichar HJ. SOX13, A γδ T Cell-Specific Gene, Is a WNT-Signaling Antagonist Regulating T Cell Development: A Dissertation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2006. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/251

17. Bautista, Bianca L. The Role of Late Antigen in CD4 Memory T Cell Formation during Influena [i.e. Influenza] Infection: A Dissertation.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Pathology, 2016, U of Massachusetts : Med

  While memory CD4 T cells are critical for effective immunity to pathogens, the mechanisms underlying their generation are poorly defined. Although extensive work has… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Antigens; CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes; Human Influenza; Influenza A virus; Immunology of Infectious Disease; Immunoprophylaxis and Therapy; Influenza Virus Vaccines; Virus Diseases

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APA (6th Edition):

Bautista, B. L. (2016). The Role of Late Antigen in CD4 Memory T Cell Formation during Influena [i.e. Influenza] Infection: A Dissertation. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/858

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bautista, Bianca L. “The Role of Late Antigen in CD4 Memory T Cell Formation during Influena [i.e. Influenza] Infection: A Dissertation.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/858.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bautista, Bianca L. “The Role of Late Antigen in CD4 Memory T Cell Formation during Influena [i.e. Influenza] Infection: A Dissertation.” 2016. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Bautista BL. The Role of Late Antigen in CD4 Memory T Cell Formation during Influena [i.e. Influenza] Infection: A Dissertation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2016. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/858.

Council of Science Editors:

Bautista BL. The Role of Late Antigen in CD4 Memory T Cell Formation during Influena [i.e. Influenza] Infection: A Dissertation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2016. Available from: http://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/858

18. Yin, Catherine C. The Role of ITK in the Development of Gamma Delta NKT Cells: A Dissertation.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Pathology, 2012, U of Massachusetts : Med

  The immune system is a complex network of interacting cells and tissues that is designed to protect the body from pathogens and other foreign… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; Natural Killer T-Cells; Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins; Cells; Enzymes and Coenzymes; Hemic and Immune Systems; Immunology and Infectious Disease; Pharmaceutical Preparations; Therapeutics; Tissues

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APA (6th Edition):

Yin, C. C. (2012). The Role of ITK in the Development of Gamma Delta NKT Cells: A Dissertation. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/636

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yin, Catherine C. “The Role of ITK in the Development of Gamma Delta NKT Cells: A Dissertation.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/636.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yin, Catherine C. “The Role of ITK in the Development of Gamma Delta NKT Cells: A Dissertation.” 2012. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Yin CC. The Role of ITK in the Development of Gamma Delta NKT Cells: A Dissertation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2012. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/636.

Council of Science Editors:

Yin CC. The Role of ITK in the Development of Gamma Delta NKT Cells: A Dissertation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2012. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/636

19. Lu, Shan. Role of Recurrent Hydrophobic Residues in Catalyzing Helix Formation by T Cell-Presented Peptides: a Thesis.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, 1990, U of Massachusetts : Med

  The overall objective of this study was to understand the mechanisms that control antigen processing and binding of peptides to major histocompatibility complex (MHC)… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: T-Lymphocytes; Immunity; Cellular; Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins; Biological Factors; Cells

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APA (6th Edition):

Lu, S. (1990). Role of Recurrent Hydrophobic Residues in Catalyzing Helix Formation by T Cell-Presented Peptides: a Thesis. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/14

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lu, Shan. “Role of Recurrent Hydrophobic Residues in Catalyzing Helix Formation by T Cell-Presented Peptides: a Thesis.” 1990. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/14.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lu, Shan. “Role of Recurrent Hydrophobic Residues in Catalyzing Helix Formation by T Cell-Presented Peptides: a Thesis.” 1990. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Lu S. Role of Recurrent Hydrophobic Residues in Catalyzing Helix Formation by T Cell-Presented Peptides: a Thesis. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 1990. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/14.

Council of Science Editors:

Lu S. Role of Recurrent Hydrophobic Residues in Catalyzing Helix Formation by T Cell-Presented Peptides: a Thesis. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 1990. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/14

20. Jain, Nitya. Multifaceted Regulation of Peripheral T Cell Tolerance and Autoimmunity by FOXP3+ T Regulatory Cells: A Dissertation.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Pathology, 2009, U of Massachusetts : Med

  Adaptive immunity requires T cell responses to foreign pathogens to be counterbalanced with the need to limit collateral destruction of the host’s own tissues.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Self Tolerance; Forkhead Transcription Factors; Autoimmunity; T-Lymphocytes; Regulatory; Homeostasis; Adaptor Proteins; Signal Transducing; Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins; Biological Factors; Cells; Hemic and Immune Systems; Organic Chemicals

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APA (6th Edition):

Jain, N. (2009). Multifaceted Regulation of Peripheral T Cell Tolerance and Autoimmunity by FOXP3+ T Regulatory Cells: A Dissertation. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/416

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jain, Nitya. “Multifaceted Regulation of Peripheral T Cell Tolerance and Autoimmunity by FOXP3+ T Regulatory Cells: A Dissertation.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/416.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jain, Nitya. “Multifaceted Regulation of Peripheral T Cell Tolerance and Autoimmunity by FOXP3+ T Regulatory Cells: A Dissertation.” 2009. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Jain N. Multifaceted Regulation of Peripheral T Cell Tolerance and Autoimmunity by FOXP3+ T Regulatory Cells: A Dissertation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2009. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/416.

Council of Science Editors:

Jain N. Multifaceted Regulation of Peripheral T Cell Tolerance and Autoimmunity by FOXP3+ T Regulatory Cells: A Dissertation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2009. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/416

21. Marshall, Heather D. Sensitization of CD8 T Cells During Acute Viral Infections Impacts Bystander and Latecomer CD8 T Cell Responses : A Dissertation.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Pathology, 2009, U of Massachusetts : Med

  Many virus infections induce a transient state of immune suppression in the infected host. Virus-induced T cell suppression can be caused by T cell… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Immune Tolerance; Bystander Effect; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes; Superinfection; Virus Diseases; Antigens; Viral; Bacterial Infections and Mycoses; Biological Factors; Cells; Hemic and Immune Systems; Parasitic Diseases; Virus Diseases

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APA (6th Edition):

Marshall, H. D. (2009). Sensitization of CD8 T Cells During Acute Viral Infections Impacts Bystander and Latecomer CD8 T Cell Responses : A Dissertation. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/440

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Marshall, Heather D. “Sensitization of CD8 T Cells During Acute Viral Infections Impacts Bystander and Latecomer CD8 T Cell Responses : A Dissertation.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/440.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Marshall, Heather D. “Sensitization of CD8 T Cells During Acute Viral Infections Impacts Bystander and Latecomer CD8 T Cell Responses : A Dissertation.” 2009. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Marshall HD. Sensitization of CD8 T Cells During Acute Viral Infections Impacts Bystander and Latecomer CD8 T Cell Responses : A Dissertation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2009. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/440.

Council of Science Editors:

Marshall HD. Sensitization of CD8 T Cells During Acute Viral Infections Impacts Bystander and Latecomer CD8 T Cell Responses : A Dissertation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2009. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/440

22. Priyadharshini, Bhavana. Regulation of Early T Cell Activation by TNF Superfamily Members TNF and FASL: A Dissertation.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Program in Molecular Medicine, 2010, U of Massachusetts : Med

  The instructive signals received by T cells during the programming stages of activation will determine the fate of effector and memory populations generated during… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes; Tumor Necrosis Factors; Fas Ligand Protein; Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins; Biological Factors; Cells; Hemic and Immune Systems; Immunology and Infectious Disease

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APA (6th Edition):

Priyadharshini, B. (2010). Regulation of Early T Cell Activation by TNF Superfamily Members TNF and FASL: A Dissertation. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/494

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Priyadharshini, Bhavana. “Regulation of Early T Cell Activation by TNF Superfamily Members TNF and FASL: A Dissertation.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/494.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Priyadharshini, Bhavana. “Regulation of Early T Cell Activation by TNF Superfamily Members TNF and FASL: A Dissertation.” 2010. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Priyadharshini B. Regulation of Early T Cell Activation by TNF Superfamily Members TNF and FASL: A Dissertation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2010. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/494.

Council of Science Editors:

Priyadharshini B. Regulation of Early T Cell Activation by TNF Superfamily Members TNF and FASL: A Dissertation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2010. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/494

23. Friberg-Robertson, Heather L. CD8+ T Cell Serotype-Cross-Reactivity is a Predominant Feature of Dengue Virus Infections in Humans: A Dissertation.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Center for Infectious Disease and Vaccine Research, 2010, U of Massachusetts : Med

  The four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV 1-4) have a significant and growing impact on global health. Dengue disease encompasses a wide range of… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Dengue Virus; Dengue; Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes; Cross Reactions; Cells; Hemic and Immune Systems; Immunology and Infectious Disease; Pathology; Public Health; Virus Diseases; Viruses

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APA (6th Edition):

Friberg-Robertson, H. L. (2010). CD8+ T Cell Serotype-Cross-Reactivity is a Predominant Feature of Dengue Virus Infections in Humans: A Dissertation. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/513

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Friberg-Robertson, Heather L. “CD8+ T Cell Serotype-Cross-Reactivity is a Predominant Feature of Dengue Virus Infections in Humans: A Dissertation.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/513.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Friberg-Robertson, Heather L. “CD8+ T Cell Serotype-Cross-Reactivity is a Predominant Feature of Dengue Virus Infections in Humans: A Dissertation.” 2010. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Friberg-Robertson HL. CD8+ T Cell Serotype-Cross-Reactivity is a Predominant Feature of Dengue Virus Infections in Humans: A Dissertation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2010. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/513.

Council of Science Editors:

Friberg-Robertson HL. CD8+ T Cell Serotype-Cross-Reactivity is a Predominant Feature of Dengue Virus Infections in Humans: A Dissertation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2010. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/513

24. O'Bryan, Joel M. Telomere Length Dynamics in Human T Cells: A Dissertation.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Department of Medicine, 2011, U of Massachusetts : Med

  Telomere length has been shown to be a critical determinant of T cell replicative capacity and in vivo persistence in humans. We evaluated telomere… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Telomere; Telomere Homeostasis; T-Lymphocytes; Cell Transformation; Viral; In Situ Hybridization; Fluorescence; Cells; Digestive System Diseases; Genetic Phenomena; Immunology and Infectious Disease; Therapeutics; Virus Diseases

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APA (6th Edition):

O'Bryan, J. M. (2011). Telomere Length Dynamics in Human T Cells: A Dissertation. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/568

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

O'Bryan, Joel M. “Telomere Length Dynamics in Human T Cells: A Dissertation.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/568.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

O'Bryan, Joel M. “Telomere Length Dynamics in Human T Cells: A Dissertation.” 2011. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

O'Bryan JM. Telomere Length Dynamics in Human T Cells: A Dissertation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2011. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/568.

Council of Science Editors:

O'Bryan JM. Telomere Length Dynamics in Human T Cells: A Dissertation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2011. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/568

25. Trobaugh, Derek W. Primary and Secondary Immune Responses During Sequential West Nile Virus and Japanese Encephalitis Virus Infections: A Dissertation.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Medicine, 2012, U of Massachusetts : Med

  Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and West Nile virus (WNV) are closely related Flaviviruses that are important arthropod-borne human pathogens. Both of these viruses can… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Encephalitis Virus; Japanese; West Nile virus; Encephalitis; West Nile Fever; Cross Protection; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes; Cells; Hemic and Immune Systems; Immunology and Infectious Disease; Virology; Virus Diseases; Viruses

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APA (6th Edition):

Trobaugh, D. W. (2012). Primary and Secondary Immune Responses During Sequential West Nile Virus and Japanese Encephalitis Virus Infections: A Dissertation. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/581

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Trobaugh, Derek W. “Primary and Secondary Immune Responses During Sequential West Nile Virus and Japanese Encephalitis Virus Infections: A Dissertation.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/581.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Trobaugh, Derek W. “Primary and Secondary Immune Responses During Sequential West Nile Virus and Japanese Encephalitis Virus Infections: A Dissertation.” 2012. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Trobaugh DW. Primary and Secondary Immune Responses During Sequential West Nile Virus and Japanese Encephalitis Virus Infections: A Dissertation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2012. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/581.

Council of Science Editors:

Trobaugh DW. Primary and Secondary Immune Responses During Sequential West Nile Virus and Japanese Encephalitis Virus Infections: A Dissertation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2012. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/581

26. Watkin, Levi B. The Role of Heterologous Immunity in Mediating Natural Resistance to Infection in Human Subjects: A Dissertation.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Pathology, 2012, U of Massachusetts : Med

  Heterologous immunity is a mechanism by which immunological memory within an individual, developed in response to a previous infection, plays a role in the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Immunity; Cellular; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes; Herpesvirus 4; Human; Influenza A virus; Cells; Hemic and Immune Systems; Immunology and Infectious Disease; Viruses

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APA (6th Edition):

Watkin, L. B. (2012). The Role of Heterologous Immunity in Mediating Natural Resistance to Infection in Human Subjects: A Dissertation. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/586

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Watkin, Levi B. “The Role of Heterologous Immunity in Mediating Natural Resistance to Infection in Human Subjects: A Dissertation.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/586.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Watkin, Levi B. “The Role of Heterologous Immunity in Mediating Natural Resistance to Infection in Human Subjects: A Dissertation.” 2012. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Watkin LB. The Role of Heterologous Immunity in Mediating Natural Resistance to Infection in Human Subjects: A Dissertation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2012. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/586.

Council of Science Editors:

Watkin LB. The Role of Heterologous Immunity in Mediating Natural Resistance to Infection in Human Subjects: A Dissertation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2012. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/586

27. Farfán Arribas, Diego José. On the Source of Peptides for Major Histocompatibility Class I Antigen Presentation: A Dissertation.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Pathology, 2012, U of Massachusetts : Med

  Peptides generated from cellular protein degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway are presented on MHC class I as a means for the immune system to… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Histocompatibility Antigens Class I; Antigen Presentation; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes; Ribosomes; Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins; Biological Factors; Cells; Hemic and Immune Systems; Immunology and Infectious Disease

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APA (6th Edition):

Farfán Arribas, D. J. (2012). On the Source of Peptides for Major Histocompatibility Class I Antigen Presentation: A Dissertation. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/589

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Farfán Arribas, Diego José. “On the Source of Peptides for Major Histocompatibility Class I Antigen Presentation: A Dissertation.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/589.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Farfán Arribas, Diego José. “On the Source of Peptides for Major Histocompatibility Class I Antigen Presentation: A Dissertation.” 2012. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Farfán Arribas DJ. On the Source of Peptides for Major Histocompatibility Class I Antigen Presentation: A Dissertation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2012. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/589.

Council of Science Editors:

Farfán Arribas DJ. On the Source of Peptides for Major Histocompatibility Class I Antigen Presentation: A Dissertation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2012. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/589

28. Lucas, Julie Ann. The Role of Itk in T Cell Development: A Dissertation.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Pathology, 2005, U of Massachusetts : Med

  Itk is a member of the Tec family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases. It is expressed in T cells, NK cells, and mast cells. The… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes; Cell Differentiation; Protein-Tyrosine Kinase; Nuclear Proteins; Animal Experimentation and Research; Cells; Enzymes and Coenzymes; Hemic and Immune Systems

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APA (6th Edition):

Lucas, J. A. (2005). The Role of Itk in T Cell Development: A Dissertation. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/91

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lucas, Julie Ann. “The Role of Itk in T Cell Development: A Dissertation.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/91.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lucas, Julie Ann. “The Role of Itk in T Cell Development: A Dissertation.” 2005. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Lucas JA. The Role of Itk in T Cell Development: A Dissertation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2005. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/91.

Council of Science Editors:

Lucas JA. The Role of Itk in T Cell Development: A Dissertation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2005. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/91

29. Atherly, Luana O. The Role of ITK and RLK in CD8+ T Cell Development and Function: a Dissertation.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Pathology, 2004, U of Massachusetts : Med

  Itk and Rlk are members of the Tec kinase family of non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases that are preferentially expressed in T cells. Numerous previous… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Protein-Tyrosine Kinase; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes; CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes; Cytokines; Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins; Biological Factors; Cells; Enzymes and Coenzymes; Hemic and Immune Systems

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Atherly, L. O. (2004). The Role of ITK and RLK in CD8+ T Cell Development and Function: a Dissertation. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/120

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Atherly, Luana O. “The Role of ITK and RLK in CD8+ T Cell Development and Function: a Dissertation.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/120.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Atherly, Luana O. “The Role of ITK and RLK in CD8+ T Cell Development and Function: a Dissertation.” 2004. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Atherly LO. The Role of ITK and RLK in CD8+ T Cell Development and Function: a Dissertation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2004. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/120.

Council of Science Editors:

Atherly LO. The Role of ITK and RLK in CD8+ T Cell Development and Function: a Dissertation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2004. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/120

30. Gozalo, Sara. The Role of γс Cytokines in T Cell Development, T Cell Homeostasis and CD8+ T Cell Function: A Dissertation.

Degree: Immunology and Microbiology, Pathology, 2004, U of Massachusetts : Med

T lymphocytes are essential components of the immune system and as such are continually regulated by a variety of factors. Every step of their… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes; Cytokines; Receptors; Cytokine; Protein-Tyrosine Kinase; T-Lymphocytes; Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins; Biological Factors; Cells; Enzymes and Coenzymes; Hemic and Immune Systems

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gozalo, S. (2004). The Role of γс Cytokines in T Cell Development, T Cell Homeostasis and CD8+ T Cell Function: A Dissertation. (Doctoral Dissertation). U of Massachusetts : Med. Retrieved from https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/140

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gozalo, Sara. “The Role of γс Cytokines in T Cell Development, T Cell Homeostasis and CD8+ T Cell Function: A Dissertation.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, U of Massachusetts : Med. Accessed August 21, 2019. https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/140.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gozalo, Sara. “The Role of γс Cytokines in T Cell Development, T Cell Homeostasis and CD8+ T Cell Function: A Dissertation.” 2004. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Gozalo S. The Role of γс Cytokines in T Cell Development, T Cell Homeostasis and CD8+ T Cell Function: A Dissertation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2004. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/140.

Council of Science Editors:

Gozalo S. The Role of γс Cytokines in T Cell Development, T Cell Homeostasis and CD8+ T Cell Function: A Dissertation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. U of Massachusetts : Med; 2004. Available from: https://escholarship.umassmed.edu/gsbs_diss/140

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