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You searched for subject:(Rapid adhesion). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Michigan Technological University

1. Narkar, Ameya R. REVERSIBLY SWITCHING ADHESION OF SMART ADHESIVES INSPIRED BY MUSSEL ADHESIVE CHEMISTRY.

Degree: PhD, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2018, Michigan Technological University

Catecholic groups in mussel adhesive proteins transition from being strongly adhesive in a reduced state under acidic conditions to being weakly adhesive in an oxidized state under basic conditions. Here, we exploit this pH responsive behavior of catechol and demonstrate that its oxidation state can be manipulated by incorporation of boronic acid to facilitate reversible transitions between strong and weak adhesion. Our first approach involved the addition of 3- acrylamido phenylboronic acid (APBA) to dopamine methacrylamide (DMA) containing adhesives. The synthesized adhesives showed strong adhesion to quartz surface in an acidic medium (pH 3), while weak adhesion was observed on raising the pH to a basic value (pH 9), due to unavailability of catechol and boronic acid because of the formation of a reversible catechol-boronate complex. Boronic acid not only contributed to adhesion at an acidic pH, but also allowed the catechol to reversibly interact with the surface in response to changing pH. In our second study, we demonstrated that addition of an anionic monomer, acrylic acid (AAc), preserved the reduced and adhesive state of catechol even at a neutral to mildly basic pH, while the addition of a cationic monomer, N-(aminopropyl) methacrylamide hydrochloride, led to the oxidized and weak adhesive state at higher basic pH values. This was due to the buffering of local pH offered by the incorporation of the ionic species, which affected the oxidation state of catechol. Although the ideal pH for formation of the complex is 9, it readily forms at neutral to mildly basic pH, leading to decreased adhesion and limiting the adhesive’s application in physiological and marine pH environments. In our third 2 approach, adding elevated amounts of AAc to smart adhesives consisting of DMA and APBA led to strong adhesion to quartz substrate at neutral to mildly basic pH. Moreover, the complex formed at pH 9 remained reversible and the interfacial binding could be tuned by changing the pH during successive contact cycles. pH 3 was required to break the complex and recover the strong adhesive property. Bulk adhesives analyzed in our first three approaches needed extended periods of incubation (up to 30 min) to switch between their adhesive and non-adhesive states. This is because infiltration of the pH media into the bulk polymer is limited by the slow process of diffusion. Finally, we fabricated a hybrid adhesive which was composed of gecko-inspired microstructured PDMS pillars (aspect ratios of 0.4-2) coated with the smart adhesive that we developed in our first approach. By tuning the aspect ratio of the bare templates, hybrid structures that showed strong, elevated adhesion at pH 3, were obtained. The increased adhesion was attributed to contact-splitting effects due to the micropatterning combined with the interfacial binding of the smart adhesive. On the other hand, formation of the complex, and the associated swelling of the adhesive together contributed to a significant decrease in adhesion at pH 9. Additionally, the… Advisors/Committee Members: Bruce P. Lee.

Subjects/Keywords: Mussel Adhesion; Catechol; Reversible adhesion; Smart Adhesive; Rapid adhesion; Biomaterials

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Narkar, A. R. (2018). REVERSIBLY SWITCHING ADHESION OF SMART ADHESIVES INSPIRED BY MUSSEL ADHESIVE CHEMISTRY. (Doctoral Dissertation). Michigan Technological University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.mtu.edu/etdr/741

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Narkar, Ameya R. “REVERSIBLY SWITCHING ADHESION OF SMART ADHESIVES INSPIRED BY MUSSEL ADHESIVE CHEMISTRY.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Michigan Technological University. Accessed January 25, 2021. https://digitalcommons.mtu.edu/etdr/741.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Narkar, Ameya R. “REVERSIBLY SWITCHING ADHESION OF SMART ADHESIVES INSPIRED BY MUSSEL ADHESIVE CHEMISTRY.” 2018. Web. 25 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Narkar AR. REVERSIBLY SWITCHING ADHESION OF SMART ADHESIVES INSPIRED BY MUSSEL ADHESIVE CHEMISTRY. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Michigan Technological University; 2018. [cited 2021 Jan 25]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.mtu.edu/etdr/741.

Council of Science Editors:

Narkar AR. REVERSIBLY SWITCHING ADHESION OF SMART ADHESIVES INSPIRED BY MUSSEL ADHESIVE CHEMISTRY. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Michigan Technological University; 2018. Available from: https://digitalcommons.mtu.edu/etdr/741

2. Joo, Sung Chul. Adhesion mechanisms of nano-particle silver to electronics packaging materials.

Degree: PhD, Mechanical Engineering, 2009, Georgia Tech

To reduce electronics packaging lead time and potentially to reduce manufacturing cost, an innovative packaging process targeting rapid package prototyping (RPP) has been developed. The developed RPP process, which is based on a data-driven chip-first approach, provides electrical functionality as well as form factors for micro-systems packages. The key component of the RPP process is the nano-particle silver (NPS) interconnect. However, NPS has not yet been adequately proven for use in electronics packaging applications. Moreover, its adhesion to electronics packaging materials such as polyimide, benzocyclobutene (BCB), copper, and aluminum is found to be weak. Thus, improving the adhesion strength of NPS will be a key issue for reliable package prototypes with NPS interconnects. In this research, the adhesion of NPS to substrate materials is found to be attributed to particle adhesion and more specifically, van der Waals forces. An adhesion model based on the van der Waals force is suggested in order to predict NPS adhesion strength to packaging materials. A new adhesion test method that is based on a die shear test and a button shear test is developed to validate the NPS adhesion prediction model. The newly developed adhesion test method is generic in nature and can be extended to other thin films' adhesion tests. The NPS adhesion model provides a general and explicit relation between NPS tensile bond strength and adhesion factors such as substrate hardness, adhesion distance, van der Waals constant, and particle diameter. The NPS adhesion model is verified as a first order adhesion model using experimental data from seventeen packaging materials. Substrate hardness is identified as a primary factor in NPS adhesion. Adhesion distance and van der Waals constant are also significant in organic and inorganic materials. Diffusion or other interfacial reaction between NPS and metal substrates such as copper and silver seems to exist. Finally, guidelines to improve the adhesion strength of NPS are suggested based on the adhesion model and on external adhesion factors such as Silane coupling agents and plasma treatment. Advisors/Committee Members: Daniel F. Baldwin (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Adhesion modeling; Adhesion mechanisms; Adhesion; Nano-particle silver; Electronics packaging; Adhesion; Nanoparticles; Silver; Electronic packaging; Rapid prototyping

ADHESION MECHANISMS OF NANO-PARTICLE SILVER TO ELECTRONICS PACKAGING MATERIALS A Thesis… …Joo ADHESION MECHANISMS OF NANO-PARTICLE SILVER TO ELECTRONICS PACKAGING MATERIALS… …23 2.3 Nano-Particle Silver (NPS) Adhesion… …25 iv CHAPTER 3 ADHESION MECHANISMS… …28 3.1 General Adhesion Mechanisms… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Joo, S. C. (2009). Adhesion mechanisms of nano-particle silver to electronics packaging materials. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/31730

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Joo, Sung Chul. “Adhesion mechanisms of nano-particle silver to electronics packaging materials.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed January 25, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/31730.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Joo, Sung Chul. “Adhesion mechanisms of nano-particle silver to electronics packaging materials.” 2009. Web. 25 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Joo SC. Adhesion mechanisms of nano-particle silver to electronics packaging materials. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2009. [cited 2021 Jan 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/31730.

Council of Science Editors:

Joo SC. Adhesion mechanisms of nano-particle silver to electronics packaging materials. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/31730

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