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You searched for subject:(Pyschosocial). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Otago

1. Wall, Catherine. Selected psychosocial variables associated with a heart healthy diet in a sample of 50 year old Cantabrians: a pilot study .

Degree: 2011, University of Otago

Background: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the main cause of death of New Zealanders after cancer and the prevalence increases dramatically with increasing age. Consumption of a heart healthy diet may improve modifiable CVD risk factors. For the purpose of this research a heart healthy diet is defined as a diet in which total fat contributes less than 35 % of total energy (% TE), saturated fat contributes less than 10 % TE, dietary fibre intake is greater than 25 g per day, fruit intake is more than two servings per day and vegetable intake is more than 3 servings per day. Some international and New Zealand research has assessed the association between selected psychosocial factors and dietary intake, but limited research has assessed the association between multiple psychosocial factors and the consumption of heart healthy dietary patterns in 50 year old men and women. This is a pilot study, the aim of which is to develop and investigate hypotheses which may be tested with a larger sample. Hypotheses: 1. That the dietary intake of 50 year old men and women from Canterbury does not meet heart healthy dietary guidelines 2. That positive attitudes and beliefs around a link between food intake and risk of disease are associated with consumption of a heart healthier diet 3. That higher barriers to eating healthily are associated with consumption of a less heart healthy diet 4. That greater education, household income and standard of living (measured using the Economic Living Standard Index Short Form (ELSISF))are associated with a heart healthier diet 5. That a greater knowledge of food composition (sugar, fat, salt and fibre content) is associated with a heart healthier diet Methods: This is an observational study of a random sample of 50 year olds currently living in the Canterbury District Health Board area. The data is that of the first 63 CHALICE study participants of which 30 were male and 33 female. Quantitative data were collected questionnaires examining demographics, measures of standard of living, health beliefs, attitudes and barriers to healthy eating administered during a face-to-face interview, a 4 day estimated food and beverage diary and anthropometric measurements. Hyothesis for this thesis were based around the health belief model (HBM), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and social cognitive theory (SCT). Data were analysed using multiple regression and principal component analysis. Findings: Fifty year old men and women in Canterbury do not eat a heart healthy diet, defined as a moderate fat, low saturated fat, high fibre, fruit and vegetable diet. Participants’ knowledge of the national food and nutrition guidelines and basic knowledge of the sugar, fat, fibre and salt content of common foods is poor. Ninety percent of participants believed that heart attacks, high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes mellitus are totally or sometimes preventable. Standard of living was inversely associated with consumption of total fat as a % TE. Education was inversely associated with… Advisors/Committee Members: Skidmore, Paula (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: diet; heart disease; pyschosocial

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APA (6th Edition):

Wall, C. (2011). Selected psychosocial variables associated with a heart healthy diet in a sample of 50 year old Cantabrians: a pilot study . (Masters Thesis). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2035

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wall, Catherine. “Selected psychosocial variables associated with a heart healthy diet in a sample of 50 year old Cantabrians: a pilot study .” 2011. Masters Thesis, University of Otago. Accessed October 19, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2035.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wall, Catherine. “Selected psychosocial variables associated with a heart healthy diet in a sample of 50 year old Cantabrians: a pilot study .” 2011. Web. 19 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Wall C. Selected psychosocial variables associated with a heart healthy diet in a sample of 50 year old Cantabrians: a pilot study . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Otago; 2011. [cited 2020 Oct 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2035.

Council of Science Editors:

Wall C. Selected psychosocial variables associated with a heart healthy diet in a sample of 50 year old Cantabrians: a pilot study . [Masters Thesis]. University of Otago; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2035


University of Minnesota

2. Crane, Holly. No Girls Allowed: A Psychosocial Examination of Women’s Relationship to Strength Training and the Weight Room.

Degree: MS, Kinesiology, 2017, University of Minnesota

Introduction: Despite the many physiological and psychological benefits of strength training, only 24.7% of American women meet the ACSM recommendations of strength training two or more times per week. Because strength training most frequently occurs in gyms, it is important to consider how the gendered environment of the weight room may influence women’s participation in strength training. Drawing on feminist theory, the purpose of the present study was to examine the potential psychosocial predictors of using free weights and specific spaces within the gym. Methods: Surveys were sent to a random sample of women who had used a campus recreation center. Participants (n=1,135) completed online questionnaires examining several psychosocial and gym use variables. Results: As hypothesized, women who considered free weight use to be a more feminine activity used free weights more frequently than women who considered free weights to be masculine. In addition, women who exhibited thinner ideal physiques used cardio machines with more frequency than those with larger ideal physiques. In terms of gym space, women with lower gender role stress used high male spaces more frequently than women with higher gender role stress. Conclusions: Results suggest that not only might some women perceive strength training to be masculine, they may also avoid strength training because it occurs in predominantly masculine spaces. This study begins to shed light on the complex relationship between socially constructed ideologies of gender and bodies and women’s individual motivations to strength train.

Subjects/Keywords: Gender; Pyschosocial; Strength Training; Weight Room; Women

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Crane, H. (2017). No Girls Allowed: A Psychosocial Examination of Women’s Relationship to Strength Training and the Weight Room. (Masters Thesis). University of Minnesota. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11299/190610

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Crane, Holly. “No Girls Allowed: A Psychosocial Examination of Women’s Relationship to Strength Training and the Weight Room.” 2017. Masters Thesis, University of Minnesota. Accessed October 19, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/11299/190610.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Crane, Holly. “No Girls Allowed: A Psychosocial Examination of Women’s Relationship to Strength Training and the Weight Room.” 2017. Web. 19 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Crane H. No Girls Allowed: A Psychosocial Examination of Women’s Relationship to Strength Training and the Weight Room. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Minnesota; 2017. [cited 2020 Oct 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11299/190610.

Council of Science Editors:

Crane H. No Girls Allowed: A Psychosocial Examination of Women’s Relationship to Strength Training and the Weight Room. [Masters Thesis]. University of Minnesota; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11299/190610


Loma Linda University

3. Nicoleau, Alicia Marie. Bonding and Psychosocial Adjustment of Youth in Foster Care.

Degree: PhD, Counseling and Family Sciences, 2017, Loma Linda University

Foster families face complex issues that include a history of maltreatment, family disruption, placement instability, behavioral problems, and other adjustment related concerns. Adjusting to these issues presents unique challenges to foster youths and their families. Using family systems theory as the theoretical lens, this study explored the ways in which youth psychosocial adjustment is related to the interactions between foster parents and foster youth in long-term placement as perceived and reported by foster parents. This study utilized a qualitative methodology with a grounded theory approach. Using in-depth interviews, foster parents described their perceptions of how their foster youth cope and adjust in the foster family context. This study has important implications for theory, research, and practice for individuals working with foster youth and their foster families. Advisors/Committee Members: Fox, Curtis A., Oloo, Winetta A., Sealy, Diadrey-Anne, Williams-Reade, Jackie.

Subjects/Keywords: Family, Life Course, and Society; Marriage and Family Therapy and Counseling; Social and Behavioral Sciences; Foster children - Mental health; Foster home care - Psychology; Foster Home Care; Family therapy; Foster Families; Family Systems Theory; Pyschosocial adjustment; Grounded theory

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nicoleau, A. M. (2017). Bonding and Psychosocial Adjustment of Youth in Foster Care. (Doctoral Dissertation). Loma Linda University. Retrieved from https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/423

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nicoleau, Alicia Marie. “Bonding and Psychosocial Adjustment of Youth in Foster Care.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Loma Linda University. Accessed October 19, 2020. https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/423.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nicoleau, Alicia Marie. “Bonding and Psychosocial Adjustment of Youth in Foster Care.” 2017. Web. 19 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Nicoleau AM. Bonding and Psychosocial Adjustment of Youth in Foster Care. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Loma Linda University; 2017. [cited 2020 Oct 19]. Available from: https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/423.

Council of Science Editors:

Nicoleau AM. Bonding and Psychosocial Adjustment of Youth in Foster Care. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Loma Linda University; 2017. Available from: https://scholarsrepository.llu.edu/etd/423

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