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You searched for subject:(Puma hunting ). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Montana Tech

1. Murphy, Kerry M. Relationships between a mountain lion population and hunting pressure in western Montana.

Degree: MS, 1983, Montana Tech

Subjects/Keywords: Puma.; Puma hunting.; Hunting Montana.

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APA (6th Edition):

Murphy, K. M. (1983). Relationships between a mountain lion population and hunting pressure in western Montana. (Masters Thesis). Montana Tech. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/7028

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Murphy, Kerry M. “Relationships between a mountain lion population and hunting pressure in western Montana.” 1983. Masters Thesis, Montana Tech. Accessed January 21, 2020. https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/7028.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Murphy, Kerry M. “Relationships between a mountain lion population and hunting pressure in western Montana.” 1983. Web. 21 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Murphy KM. Relationships between a mountain lion population and hunting pressure in western Montana. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Montana Tech; 1983. [cited 2020 Jan 21]. Available from: https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/7028.

Council of Science Editors:

Murphy KM. Relationships between a mountain lion population and hunting pressure in western Montana. [Masters Thesis]. Montana Tech; 1983. Available from: https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/7028


Michigan State University

2. Kelly, Jennifer Rebecca. Considering the lives of humans (Homo sapiens), jaguars (Panthera onca), and pumas (Puma concolor) in the nation of nature : measuring the capacity for coexistence with large predators in the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor.

Degree: 2015, Michigan State University

Thesis Ph. D. Michigan State University. Sociology 2015

One of the greatest threats to jaguars (Panthera onca), the largest predator in Latin America, is hunting. In an effort to understand conflict between humans and jaguars some conservation biologists, who lack training in the social sciences, have assessed human perceptions and attitudes of jaguars. Conclusions have resulted in a call for sociocultural and social psychological research. My dissertation is a response to this plea. To investigate the capacity for humans to coexist with jaguars and pumas (Puma concolor) I assessed sociocultural meanings embedded in conflict, explored the ability of a rancher outreach program to reduce conflict, and synthesized environmental and wildlife discourses on cognitive constructs in understanding human behavior toward wild animals. Results from over one year of participant observation and 131 interviews of Ticos and Cabécar indigenous in the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor (MBC) of Costa Rica reveal both direct encounters and traditions embedded in culture have an impact on human conflict with large felines. Furthermore, programs aiming to reduce conflict between humans and large felines need to consider that coexistence is both culturally sensitive and based on geographical proximity. Ultimately, this study offers insight into how indigenous peoples interweave both traditional and modernized meanings of large predators—perspectives that have important implications for conservation and coexistence. Despite positive initiatives toward coexistence in this part of the MBC, they are still in their infancy and face tensions against a prominent hunting culture. My findings offer recommendations for future research surrounding human conflict and coexistence with large predators that will inform practical solutions and outreach interventions. Given this study is one of the first conducted by a social scientist on human jaguar relations it is important for both feline conservation efforts and for understanding human predator coexistence within biological corridors globally.

Description based on online resource;

Advisors/Committee Members: Kalof, Linda, Medina, Laurie, Dietz, Tom, McCright, Aaron.

Subjects/Keywords: Jaguar hunting – Costa Rica; Puma hunting – Costa Rica; Jaguar – Effect of hunting on – Costa Rica; Puma – Effect of hunting on – Costa Rica; Human-animal relationships – Costa Rica; Hunting – Environmental aspects – Costa Rica; Wildlife conservation – Costa Rica; Wildlife conservation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kelly, J. R. (2015). Considering the lives of humans (Homo sapiens), jaguars (Panthera onca), and pumas (Puma concolor) in the nation of nature : measuring the capacity for coexistence with large predators in the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor. (Thesis). Michigan State University. Retrieved from http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:3540

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kelly, Jennifer Rebecca. “Considering the lives of humans (Homo sapiens), jaguars (Panthera onca), and pumas (Puma concolor) in the nation of nature : measuring the capacity for coexistence with large predators in the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor.” 2015. Thesis, Michigan State University. Accessed January 21, 2020. http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:3540.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kelly, Jennifer Rebecca. “Considering the lives of humans (Homo sapiens), jaguars (Panthera onca), and pumas (Puma concolor) in the nation of nature : measuring the capacity for coexistence with large predators in the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor.” 2015. Web. 21 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Kelly JR. Considering the lives of humans (Homo sapiens), jaguars (Panthera onca), and pumas (Puma concolor) in the nation of nature : measuring the capacity for coexistence with large predators in the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor. [Internet] [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2015. [cited 2020 Jan 21]. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:3540.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Kelly JR. Considering the lives of humans (Homo sapiens), jaguars (Panthera onca), and pumas (Puma concolor) in the nation of nature : measuring the capacity for coexistence with large predators in the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor. [Thesis]. Michigan State University; 2015. Available from: http://etd.lib.msu.edu/islandora/object/etd:3540

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Hertz, Jeffrey C. Ehrlichia and Rickettsia Tick-Borne Infections Associated with Lone Star Ticks and Under-Sampled Wildlife Hosts in Florida.

Degree: PhD, Entomology and Nematology, 2016, University of Florida

Once considered only to be a nuisance because of its aggressive biting behavior Advisors/Committee Members: KAUFMAN,PHILLIP EDWARD (committee chair), ALLAN,SANDRA A (committee member), DARK,MICHAEL JAMES (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Adult insects; Ehrlichia; Infections; Nymphs; Pathogens; Rickettsia; Species; Ticks; Wildlife; Wildlife management; amblyomma  – amblyommii  – dermacentor  – haemaphysalis  – hunting  – ixodes  – ixodidae  – lynx  – meleagris  – multiplex  – odocoileus  – parkeri  – prevalence  – procyon  – puma  – reis  – rhipicephali  – seasonality  – spatial  – sus  – temporal  – turkey  – urocyon  – ursus

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hertz, J. C. (2016). Ehrlichia and Rickettsia Tick-Borne Infections Associated with Lone Star Ticks and Under-Sampled Wildlife Hosts in Florida. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Florida. Retrieved from http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0050244

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hertz, Jeffrey C. “Ehrlichia and Rickettsia Tick-Borne Infections Associated with Lone Star Ticks and Under-Sampled Wildlife Hosts in Florida.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Florida. Accessed January 21, 2020. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0050244.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hertz, Jeffrey C. “Ehrlichia and Rickettsia Tick-Borne Infections Associated with Lone Star Ticks and Under-Sampled Wildlife Hosts in Florida.” 2016. Web. 21 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Hertz JC. Ehrlichia and Rickettsia Tick-Borne Infections Associated with Lone Star Ticks and Under-Sampled Wildlife Hosts in Florida. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Florida; 2016. [cited 2020 Jan 21]. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0050244.

Council of Science Editors:

Hertz JC. Ehrlichia and Rickettsia Tick-Borne Infections Associated with Lone Star Ticks and Under-Sampled Wildlife Hosts in Florida. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Florida; 2016. Available from: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0050244

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