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You searched for subject:(Psychological contract repair). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Rochester Institute of Technology

1. Alongi, Anthony. Effects of group apology and reparation after breach of psychological contract.

Degree: Department of Psychology (CLA), 2011, Rochester Institute of Technology

Psychological contracts are expectations of reciprocal obligations between an employee and an organization which are held by the employee. Research has shown that victims who experience psychological contract breach may seek to retaliate towards the offending organization. Little research has investigated how a breach can be remediated. The present study investigated the effects of a group apology and reparation on victim‟s sense of power and revenge cognition after a breach of psychological contract. Participants were asked to imagine themselves in a vignette in which a student experiences psychological contract breach by their academic department. The outcome of the scenario differed according to the condition to which they were assigned: they received no response from the department, they received reparations, they received an apology, or they received an apology with reparations. All participants then completed the same series of measures, including their sense of power, revenge cognitions, likelihood to transmit a negative rumor, calculus-based trust, and identification-based trust. Results showed that reparations elicited a greater sense of power and less revenge cognition in the victim compared to not receiving a response. Receiving an apology did not increase sense of power or decrease revenge cognition. Additionally, the effect of reparations on sense of power and revenge cognition is mediated by calculus-based trust. Implications for these results suggest that if an organization breaches psychological contract and wishes to repair the relationship with the victim, they should focus in offering adequate reparations, as an apology may not be helpful in diffusing retaliation. Advisors/Committee Members: DiFonzo, Nicholas.

Subjects/Keywords: Apology; Conflict; Group; Psychological contract; Psychological contract breach; Psychological contract repair

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Alongi, A. (2011). Effects of group apology and reparation after breach of psychological contract. (Thesis). Rochester Institute of Technology. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.rit.edu/theses/1374

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Alongi, Anthony. “Effects of group apology and reparation after breach of psychological contract.” 2011. Thesis, Rochester Institute of Technology. Accessed September 15, 2019. https://scholarworks.rit.edu/theses/1374.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Alongi, Anthony. “Effects of group apology and reparation after breach of psychological contract.” 2011. Web. 15 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Alongi A. Effects of group apology and reparation after breach of psychological contract. [Internet] [Thesis]. Rochester Institute of Technology; 2011. [cited 2019 Sep 15]. Available from: https://scholarworks.rit.edu/theses/1374.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Alongi A. Effects of group apology and reparation after breach of psychological contract. [Thesis]. Rochester Institute of Technology; 2011. Available from: https://scholarworks.rit.edu/theses/1374

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Queensland University of Technology

2. Bankins, Sarah Maria. Investigating the dynamics of the psychological contract : how and why individuals' contract beliefs change.

Degree: 2012, Queensland University of Technology

The overall objective of this thesis is to explore how and why the content of individuals' psychological contracts changes over time. The contract is generally understood as "individual beliefs, shaped by the organisation, regarding the terms of an exchange agreement between individuals and their organisation" (Rousseau, 1995, p. 9). With an overall study sampling frame of 320 graduate organisational newcomers, a mixed method longitudinal research design comprised of three sequential, inter-related studies is employed in order to capture the change process. From the 15 semi-structured interviews conducted in Study 1, the key findings included identifying a relatively high degree of mutuality between employees' and their managers' reciprocal contract beliefs around the time of organisational entry. Also, at this time, individuals had developed specific components of their contract content through a mix of social network information (regarding broader employment expectations) and perceptions of various elements of their particular organisation's reputation (for more firm-specific expectations). Study 2 utilised a four-wave survey approach (available to the full sampling frame) over the 14 months following organisational entry to explore the 'shape' of individuals' contract change trajectories and the role of four theorised change predictors in driving these trajectories. The predictors represented an organisational-level informational cue (perceptions of corporate reputation), a dyadic-level informational cue (perceptions of manager-employee relationship quality) and two individual difference variables (affect and hardiness). Through the use of individual growth modelling, the findings showed differences in the general change patterns across contract content components of perceived employer (exhibiting generally quadratic change patterns) and employee (exhibiting generally no-change patterns) obligations. Further, individuals differentially used the predictor variables to construct beliefs about specific contract content. While both organisational- and dyadic-level cues were focused upon to construct employer obligation beliefs, organisational-level cues and individual difference variables were focused upon to construct employee obligation beliefs. Through undertaking 26 semi-structured interviews, Study 3 focused upon gaining a richer understanding of why participants' contracts changed, or otherwise, over the study period, with a particular focus upon the roles of breach and violation. Breach refers to an employee's perception that an employer obligation has not been met and violation refers to the negative and affective employee reactions which may ensue following a breach. The main contribution of these findings was identifying that subsequent to a breach or violation event a range of 'remediation effects' could be activated by employees which, depending upon their effectiveness, served to instigate either breach or contract repair or both. These effects mostly instigated broader contract repair and were…

Subjects/Keywords: psychological contract; change; development; longitudinal; mixed methods; individual growth modelling; corporate reputation; leader-member exchange; positive and negative affect; hardiness; breach and violation; breach and contract remediation and repair

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bankins, S. M. (2012). Investigating the dynamics of the psychological contract : how and why individuals' contract beliefs change. (Thesis). Queensland University of Technology. Retrieved from https://eprints.qut.edu.au/53135/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bankins, Sarah Maria. “Investigating the dynamics of the psychological contract : how and why individuals' contract beliefs change.” 2012. Thesis, Queensland University of Technology. Accessed September 15, 2019. https://eprints.qut.edu.au/53135/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bankins, Sarah Maria. “Investigating the dynamics of the psychological contract : how and why individuals' contract beliefs change.” 2012. Web. 15 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Bankins SM. Investigating the dynamics of the psychological contract : how and why individuals' contract beliefs change. [Internet] [Thesis]. Queensland University of Technology; 2012. [cited 2019 Sep 15]. Available from: https://eprints.qut.edu.au/53135/.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Bankins SM. Investigating the dynamics of the psychological contract : how and why individuals' contract beliefs change. [Thesis]. Queensland University of Technology; 2012. Available from: https://eprints.qut.edu.au/53135/

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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