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University: University of Washington

You searched for subject:(Protein Engineering). Showing records 1 – 30 of 34 total matches.

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University of Washington

1. Day, Austin L. Computational Design of Small Molecule Binding Proteins.

Degree: PhD, 2015, University of Washington

Protein design is still in its infancy, yet there have been many impressive examples of success in designing proteins to fold into a predictable structure,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Computational; Ligand; Methods; Protein Design; Protein Engineering; Small Molecule; Biomedical engineering; Biochemistry; bioengineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Day, A. L. (2015). Computational Design of Small Molecule Binding Proteins. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33592

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Day, Austin L. “Computational Design of Small Molecule Binding Proteins.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33592.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Day, Austin L. “Computational Design of Small Molecule Binding Proteins.” 2015. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Day AL. Computational Design of Small Molecule Binding Proteins. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2015. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33592.

Council of Science Editors:

Day AL. Computational Design of Small Molecule Binding Proteins. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33592


University of Washington

2. Dang, Luke Thomas. Computational Design and Optimization of Novel Subtype Specific Frizzled Binding Proteins for Modulation of Wnt Signaling.

Degree: PhD, 2017, University of Washington

 Wnt signaling is essential to a range of critical biologic processes including embryonic development, mature tissue maintenance, and cell proliferation. Dysregulation of the Wnt signaling… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Ankyrin Repeat Protein; Computational Protein Design; Frizzled; Protein Engineering; Rosetta; Wnt Signaling; Molecular biology; Biochemistry; Biomedical engineering; Molecular and cellular biology

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APA (6th Edition):

Dang, L. T. (2017). Computational Design and Optimization of Novel Subtype Specific Frizzled Binding Proteins for Modulation of Wnt Signaling. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40260

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dang, Luke Thomas. “Computational Design and Optimization of Novel Subtype Specific Frizzled Binding Proteins for Modulation of Wnt Signaling.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40260.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dang, Luke Thomas. “Computational Design and Optimization of Novel Subtype Specific Frizzled Binding Proteins for Modulation of Wnt Signaling.” 2017. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Dang LT. Computational Design and Optimization of Novel Subtype Specific Frizzled Binding Proteins for Modulation of Wnt Signaling. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2017. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40260.

Council of Science Editors:

Dang LT. Computational Design and Optimization of Novel Subtype Specific Frizzled Binding Proteins for Modulation of Wnt Signaling. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40260


University of Washington

3. Younger, David Aaron. High-Throughput Characterization of Protein-Protein Interactions by Reprogramming Yeast Mating.

Degree: PhD, 2017, University of Washington

 High-throughput methods for screening protein-protein interactions enable the rapid characterization of engineered binding proteins and interaction networks. While existing approaches are powerful, none allow quantitative… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: High-throughput screening; Protein Engineering; Protein-protein interaction networks; Synthetic Biology; Yeast Mating; Biomedical engineering; Biochemistry; Cellular biology; Bioengineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Younger, D. A. (2017). High-Throughput Characterization of Protein-Protein Interactions by Reprogramming Yeast Mating. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40488

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Younger, David Aaron. “High-Throughput Characterization of Protein-Protein Interactions by Reprogramming Yeast Mating.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40488.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Younger, David Aaron. “High-Throughput Characterization of Protein-Protein Interactions by Reprogramming Yeast Mating.” 2017. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Younger DA. High-Throughput Characterization of Protein-Protein Interactions by Reprogramming Yeast Mating. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2017. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40488.

Council of Science Editors:

Younger DA. High-Throughput Characterization of Protein-Protein Interactions by Reprogramming Yeast Mating. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40488


University of Washington

4. Swift, Brian James Fullerton. Engineering Solid Binding Proteins for the Biofabrication of Environmentally Friendly Multi-functional Quantum Dots.

Degree: PhD, 2016, University of Washington

 Methods that emulate Nature’s remarkable ability to synthesize chemically and structurally intricate architectures are of considerable interest for the fabrication of industrially-relevant materials and systems.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biofabrication; Protein engineering; Quantum dots; Chemical engineering; chemical engineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Swift, B. J. F. (2016). Engineering Solid Binding Proteins for the Biofabrication of Environmentally Friendly Multi-functional Quantum Dots. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/35548

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Swift, Brian James Fullerton. “Engineering Solid Binding Proteins for the Biofabrication of Environmentally Friendly Multi-functional Quantum Dots.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/35548.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Swift, Brian James Fullerton. “Engineering Solid Binding Proteins for the Biofabrication of Environmentally Friendly Multi-functional Quantum Dots.” 2016. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Swift BJF. Engineering Solid Binding Proteins for the Biofabrication of Environmentally Friendly Multi-functional Quantum Dots. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2016. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/35548.

Council of Science Editors:

Swift BJF. Engineering Solid Binding Proteins for the Biofabrication of Environmentally Friendly Multi-functional Quantum Dots. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/35548


University of Washington

5. Bryan, Cassie Marie. Computational Design of Hyperstable, De Novo Miniproteins Targeting PD-1.

Degree: PhD, 2018, University of Washington

 Computational protein design has recently advanced to a new era with the de novo design of stable proteins targeting native protein ligands. In this dissertation,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Computational Design; PD-1; Protein Design; Protein Engineering; Yeast Display; Biochemistry; Bioengineering; Biological chemistry

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APA (6th Edition):

Bryan, C. M. (2018). Computational Design of Hyperstable, De Novo Miniproteins Targeting PD-1. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40848

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bryan, Cassie Marie. “Computational Design of Hyperstable, De Novo Miniproteins Targeting PD-1.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40848.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bryan, Cassie Marie. “Computational Design of Hyperstable, De Novo Miniproteins Targeting PD-1.” 2018. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Bryan CM. Computational Design of Hyperstable, De Novo Miniproteins Targeting PD-1. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2018. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40848.

Council of Science Editors:

Bryan CM. Computational Design of Hyperstable, De Novo Miniproteins Targeting PD-1. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40848


University of Washington

6. Yu, Shawn. Computational design of interleukin-2 mimetics.

Degree: PhD, 2015, University of Washington

 Interleukin-2 is a cytokine that plays a central role in immune system homeostasis, exerting paradoxical immunostimulatory and immunoregulatory effects based on its interactions with various… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: computational design; interleukin-2; protein design; protein engineering; Rosetta; Biochemistry; Immunology; bioengineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Yu, S. (2015). Computational design of interleukin-2 mimetics. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33593

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yu, Shawn. “Computational design of interleukin-2 mimetics.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33593.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yu, Shawn. “Computational design of interleukin-2 mimetics.” 2015. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Yu S. Computational design of interleukin-2 mimetics. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2015. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33593.

Council of Science Editors:

Yu S. Computational design of interleukin-2 mimetics. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33593


University of Washington

7. Haydon, Ian. De novo protein fusions as platforms for enzyme design.

Degree: 2019, University of Washington

 Control over enzymatic catalysis is a central goal of biotechnology. Recent advances in computational protein design are beginning to allow for the de novo creation… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: computational biology; enzymes; protein design; protein engineering; Biochemistry; Bioengineering; Biophysics; Biological chemistry

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APA (6th Edition):

Haydon, I. (2019). De novo protein fusions as platforms for enzyme design. (Thesis). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43305

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Haydon, Ian. “De novo protein fusions as platforms for enzyme design.” 2019. Thesis, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43305.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Haydon, Ian. “De novo protein fusions as platforms for enzyme design.” 2019. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Haydon I. De novo protein fusions as platforms for enzyme design. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2019. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43305.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Haydon I. De novo protein fusions as platforms for enzyme design. [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43305

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Washington

8. Liu, Luman. Cyclic Stiffness Photomodulation of Cell-Laden Protein-Polymer Hydrogels.

Degree: 2017, University of Washington

 Although mechanical signals presented by the extracellular matrix are known to regulate many essential cell functions, the specific effects of these interactions, particularly in response… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cell culture; Hydrogel; Luciferase; Peptide; Protein; Stiffness; Chemical engineering; Chemical engineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Liu, L. (2017). Cyclic Stiffness Photomodulation of Cell-Laden Protein-Polymer Hydrogels. (Thesis). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40508

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Liu, Luman. “Cyclic Stiffness Photomodulation of Cell-Laden Protein-Polymer Hydrogels.” 2017. Thesis, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40508.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Liu, Luman. “Cyclic Stiffness Photomodulation of Cell-Laden Protein-Polymer Hydrogels.” 2017. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Liu L. Cyclic Stiffness Photomodulation of Cell-Laden Protein-Polymer Hydrogels. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2017. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40508.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Liu L. Cyclic Stiffness Photomodulation of Cell-Laden Protein-Polymer Hydrogels. [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40508

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Washington

9. Tung, Hsin-Ju. Accelerating protein unfolding simulations: Effect of ionic liquids on villin headpiece unfolding time.

Degree: 2016, University of Washington

 We demonstrate an approach to accelerate protein unfolding simulation using the metadynamics (MetaD) method, and the new rate calculation method “infrequent metadynamics”. The accelerated simulation… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Molecular dynamics; Protein unfold; Chemical engineering; Biochemistry; chemical engineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Tung, H. (2016). Accelerating protein unfolding simulations: Effect of ionic liquids on villin headpiece unfolding time. (Thesis). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/35547

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tung, Hsin-Ju. “Accelerating protein unfolding simulations: Effect of ionic liquids on villin headpiece unfolding time.” 2016. Thesis, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/35547.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tung, Hsin-Ju. “Accelerating protein unfolding simulations: Effect of ionic liquids on villin headpiece unfolding time.” 2016. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Tung H. Accelerating protein unfolding simulations: Effect of ionic liquids on villin headpiece unfolding time. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2016. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/35547.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Tung H. Accelerating protein unfolding simulations: Effect of ionic liquids on villin headpiece unfolding time. [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/35547

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Washington

10. Shao, Qing. Understanding Properties of Zwitterionic Materials from Their Molecular Structures.

Degree: PhD, 2014, University of Washington

 Materials that resist nonspecific protein adsorption in complex media are important for many biological and chemical applications, such as surface coatings of biosensors, marine coatings,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: hydration; molecular simulation; nonspecific protein adsorption; zwitterion; Chemical engineering; chemical engineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Shao, Q. (2014). Understanding Properties of Zwitterionic Materials from Their Molecular Structures. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/25365

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Shao, Qing. “Understanding Properties of Zwitterionic Materials from Their Molecular Structures.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/25365.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Shao, Qing. “Understanding Properties of Zwitterionic Materials from Their Molecular Structures.” 2014. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Shao Q. Understanding Properties of Zwitterionic Materials from Their Molecular Structures. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2014. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/25365.

Council of Science Editors:

Shao Q. Understanding Properties of Zwitterionic Materials from Their Molecular Structures. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/25365


University of Washington

11. Prakash, Arushi. Understanding Self-Assembly in Solution and at Interfaces Using All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Enhanced Sampling Methods.

Degree: PhD, 2019, University of Washington

 Proteins and biopolymers self-assemble to form nanostructures in solution or at interfaces. Notable examples include, the formation of plaque during Alzheimer’s disease, and the formation… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: metadynamics; molecular simulations; protein; Computational chemistry; Chemical engineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Prakash, A. (2019). Understanding Self-Assembly in Solution and at Interfaces Using All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Enhanced Sampling Methods. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43324

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Prakash, Arushi. “Understanding Self-Assembly in Solution and at Interfaces Using All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Enhanced Sampling Methods.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43324.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Prakash, Arushi. “Understanding Self-Assembly in Solution and at Interfaces Using All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Enhanced Sampling Methods.” 2019. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Prakash A. Understanding Self-Assembly in Solution and at Interfaces Using All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Enhanced Sampling Methods. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2019. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43324.

Council of Science Editors:

Prakash A. Understanding Self-Assembly in Solution and at Interfaces Using All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Enhanced Sampling Methods. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43324


University of Washington

12. McCully, Michelle E. The Dynamics and Folding Pathways of Naturally Occurring and Engineered Proteins at Atomic Resolution.

Degree: PhD, 2013, University of Washington

 The protein folding problem, the aim to understand how a protein’s amino acid sequence alone is sufficient to dictate its folded structure in a given… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Engineered Proteins; Engrailed Homeodomain; Folding Pathway; Molecular Dynamics; Protein Dynamics; Protein Folding; Biophysics; Biochemistry; Biomedical engineering; Bioengineering

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APA (6th Edition):

McCully, M. E. (2013). The Dynamics and Folding Pathways of Naturally Occurring and Engineered Proteins at Atomic Resolution. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/21861

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McCully, Michelle E. “The Dynamics and Folding Pathways of Naturally Occurring and Engineered Proteins at Atomic Resolution.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/21861.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McCully, Michelle E. “The Dynamics and Folding Pathways of Naturally Occurring and Engineered Proteins at Atomic Resolution.” 2013. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

McCully ME. The Dynamics and Folding Pathways of Naturally Occurring and Engineered Proteins at Atomic Resolution. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2013. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/21861.

Council of Science Editors:

McCully ME. The Dynamics and Folding Pathways of Naturally Occurring and Engineered Proteins at Atomic Resolution. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/21861


University of Washington

13. Coyle, Brandon. Solid-binding Proteins for Modification of Inorganic Substrates.

Degree: PhD, 2014, University of Washington

 Robust and simple strategies to directly functionalize graphene- and diamond-based nanostructures with proteins are of considerable interest for biologically driven manufacturing, biosensing and bioimaging. In… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Carbon Nanotubes; Disposable protein purification; Graphene; silica; Chemical engineering; Nanotechnology; chemical engineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Coyle, B. (2014). Solid-binding Proteins for Modification of Inorganic Substrates. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/26505

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Coyle, Brandon. “Solid-binding Proteins for Modification of Inorganic Substrates.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/26505.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Coyle, Brandon. “Solid-binding Proteins for Modification of Inorganic Substrates.” 2014. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Coyle B. Solid-binding Proteins for Modification of Inorganic Substrates. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2014. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/26505.

Council of Science Editors:

Coyle B. Solid-binding Proteins for Modification of Inorganic Substrates. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/26505


University of Washington

14. Zhang, Peng. Improving Safety and Efficacy of Protein Therapeutics by Chemical Modifications.

Degree: PhD, 2019, University of Washington

Protein therapeutics offer the advantages of high specificity and potency. However, their applications are greatly limited due to undesired immune responses, which not only reduce… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Anti-PEG; Biomaterial; Drug delivery; Immunogenicity; Protein; Zwitterionic; Chemical engineering; Bioengineering; Chemical engineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Zhang, P. (2019). Improving Safety and Efficacy of Protein Therapeutics by Chemical Modifications. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43320

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zhang, Peng. “Improving Safety and Efficacy of Protein Therapeutics by Chemical Modifications.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43320.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zhang, Peng. “Improving Safety and Efficacy of Protein Therapeutics by Chemical Modifications.” 2019. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Zhang P. Improving Safety and Efficacy of Protein Therapeutics by Chemical Modifications. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2019. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43320.

Council of Science Editors:

Zhang P. Improving Safety and Efficacy of Protein Therapeutics by Chemical Modifications. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43320


University of Washington

15. Gawade, Prathamesh Milind. Logic-Based Delivery of Site-Specifically-Modified Proteins from Gels through Engineered Biomacromolecular Architecture.

Degree: 2016, University of Washington

 Stimuli-responsive behavior has been widely used to design hydrogels for the delivery of therapeutic proteins. However, these delivery platforms are often restricted to a single… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Degradation; Hydrogel; Patterning; Protein release; Sortase; Chemical engineering; Materials Science; chemical engineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Gawade, P. M. (2016). Logic-Based Delivery of Site-Specifically-Modified Proteins from Gels through Engineered Biomacromolecular Architecture. (Thesis). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/37054

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gawade, Prathamesh Milind. “Logic-Based Delivery of Site-Specifically-Modified Proteins from Gels through Engineered Biomacromolecular Architecture.” 2016. Thesis, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/37054.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gawade, Prathamesh Milind. “Logic-Based Delivery of Site-Specifically-Modified Proteins from Gels through Engineered Biomacromolecular Architecture.” 2016. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Gawade PM. Logic-Based Delivery of Site-Specifically-Modified Proteins from Gels through Engineered Biomacromolecular Architecture. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2016. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/37054.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Gawade PM. Logic-Based Delivery of Site-Specifically-Modified Proteins from Gels through Engineered Biomacromolecular Architecture. [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/37054

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Washington

16. Berger, Stephanie. Controlling apoptosis with computationally designed inhibitors targeting pro-survival and pro-apoptosis BCL2 family members.

Degree: PhD, 2017, University of Washington

 BCL2 family proteins regulate apoptosis and thus play a critical role in tissue homeostasis and development in healthy cells. A number of pathologies exploit the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: apoptosis; BCL2; cancer; computational protein design; Molecular biology; Biomedical engineering; Biochemistry; Bioengineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Berger, S. (2017). Controlling apoptosis with computationally designed inhibitors targeting pro-survival and pro-apoptosis BCL2 family members. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/39947

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Berger, Stephanie. “Controlling apoptosis with computationally designed inhibitors targeting pro-survival and pro-apoptosis BCL2 family members.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/39947.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Berger, Stephanie. “Controlling apoptosis with computationally designed inhibitors targeting pro-survival and pro-apoptosis BCL2 family members.” 2017. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Berger S. Controlling apoptosis with computationally designed inhibitors targeting pro-survival and pro-apoptosis BCL2 family members. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2017. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/39947.

Council of Science Editors:

Berger S. Controlling apoptosis with computationally designed inhibitors targeting pro-survival and pro-apoptosis BCL2 family members. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/39947


University of Washington

17. Ueda, George Thomas. Computational Design of Symmetric Protein Complexes with Implications for Vaccine and Biotherapeutic Development.

Degree: PhD, 2019, University of Washington

 Using a newly developed computational docking and scoring method combined with Rosetta two-sided interface design, we demonstrated accurate design of self-assembling oligomeric proteins that exhibit… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biotherapeutic; Computational; Design; Engineering; Protein; Vaccine; Biochemistry; Bioengineering; Computational chemistry; Biological chemistry

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APA (6th Edition):

Ueda, G. T. (2019). Computational Design of Symmetric Protein Complexes with Implications for Vaccine and Biotherapeutic Development. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43303

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ueda, George Thomas. “Computational Design of Symmetric Protein Complexes with Implications for Vaccine and Biotherapeutic Development.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43303.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ueda, George Thomas. “Computational Design of Symmetric Protein Complexes with Implications for Vaccine and Biotherapeutic Development.” 2019. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Ueda GT. Computational Design of Symmetric Protein Complexes with Implications for Vaccine and Biotherapeutic Development. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2019. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43303.

Council of Science Editors:

Ueda GT. Computational Design of Symmetric Protein Complexes with Implications for Vaccine and Biotherapeutic Development. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43303


University of Washington

18. Corrigan, Trevor. Hunt for a Genetically Engineered, Rationally Designed, Stealth Peptide to Prevent Non-Specific Protein Interactions.

Degree: 2018, University of Washington

 The objective of this study is to identify the best zwitterionic peptide as a tail of a fusion protein to preserve protein stability and bioactivity… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Amino Acid; Bio-degradable; Non-Fouling; Non-Specific; Protein; Zwitterionic; Chemical engineering; Molecular biology; Bioengineering; Chemical engineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Corrigan, T. (2018). Hunt for a Genetically Engineered, Rationally Designed, Stealth Peptide to Prevent Non-Specific Protein Interactions. (Thesis). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/42232

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Corrigan, Trevor. “Hunt for a Genetically Engineered, Rationally Designed, Stealth Peptide to Prevent Non-Specific Protein Interactions.” 2018. Thesis, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/42232.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Corrigan, Trevor. “Hunt for a Genetically Engineered, Rationally Designed, Stealth Peptide to Prevent Non-Specific Protein Interactions.” 2018. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Corrigan T. Hunt for a Genetically Engineered, Rationally Designed, Stealth Peptide to Prevent Non-Specific Protein Interactions. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2018. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/42232.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Corrigan T. Hunt for a Genetically Engineered, Rationally Designed, Stealth Peptide to Prevent Non-Specific Protein Interactions. [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/42232

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Washington

19. Tronic, Elaine Hillenmeyer. Surface Analysis of Adsorbed Proteins: A Multi-Technique Approach to Characterize Surface Structure.

Degree: PhD, 2013, University of Washington

 Adsorbed proteins on surfaces are important in many applications, including medical implants, sensors, marine materials, and in vitro substrates for cell culture and other uses.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Collagen; Fibronectin; Protein adsorption; Surface analysis; ToF-SIMS; von Willebrand Factor; Biomedical engineering; Chemical engineering; bioengineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Tronic, E. H. (2013). Surface Analysis of Adsorbed Proteins: A Multi-Technique Approach to Characterize Surface Structure. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/22654

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tronic, Elaine Hillenmeyer. “Surface Analysis of Adsorbed Proteins: A Multi-Technique Approach to Characterize Surface Structure.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/22654.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tronic, Elaine Hillenmeyer. “Surface Analysis of Adsorbed Proteins: A Multi-Technique Approach to Characterize Surface Structure.” 2013. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Tronic EH. Surface Analysis of Adsorbed Proteins: A Multi-Technique Approach to Characterize Surface Structure. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2013. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/22654.

Council of Science Editors:

Tronic EH. Surface Analysis of Adsorbed Proteins: A Multi-Technique Approach to Characterize Surface Structure. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/22654


University of Washington

20. Rose, John Christopher. Dynamic control of intracellular signaling and genome engineering in space and time.

Degree: PhD, 2017, University of Washington

 Cells continuously sense both their external and internal environments, integrate diverse and often conflicting information, and respond. The potential responses are remarkably varied: it could… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Chemical Biology; CRISPR/Cas9; Genome Engineering; Intracellular Signaling; Protein Design; RAS; Molecular biology; Biochemistry; Cellular biology; Molecular and cellular biology

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APA (6th Edition):

Rose, J. C. (2017). Dynamic control of intracellular signaling and genome engineering in space and time. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40263

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rose, John Christopher. “Dynamic control of intracellular signaling and genome engineering in space and time.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40263.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rose, John Christopher. “Dynamic control of intracellular signaling and genome engineering in space and time.” 2017. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Rose JC. Dynamic control of intracellular signaling and genome engineering in space and time. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2017. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40263.

Council of Science Editors:

Rose JC. Dynamic control of intracellular signaling and genome engineering in space and time. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40263

21. Holstein, Carly Ann. Development of a Novel Paper-Based Flu Test for Improved Diagnosis at the Point of Care.

Degree: PhD, 2015, University of Washington

 The development of paper-based diagnostics has surged in recent years, due to the suitability of these tests for use at the point of care. Paper-based… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Influenza; Nitrocellulose; Paper-based diagnostics; Paper microfluidics; Point-of-care diagnostics; Protein adsorption; Biomedical engineering; bioengineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Holstein, C. A. (2015). Development of a Novel Paper-Based Flu Test for Improved Diagnosis at the Point of Care. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33583

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Holstein, Carly Ann. “Development of a Novel Paper-Based Flu Test for Improved Diagnosis at the Point of Care.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33583.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Holstein, Carly Ann. “Development of a Novel Paper-Based Flu Test for Improved Diagnosis at the Point of Care.” 2015. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Holstein CA. Development of a Novel Paper-Based Flu Test for Improved Diagnosis at the Point of Care. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2015. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33583.

Council of Science Editors:

Holstein CA. Development of a Novel Paper-Based Flu Test for Improved Diagnosis at the Point of Care. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33583


University of Washington

22. Bale, Jacob Barile. Computational design of co-assembling multi-component protein nanomaterials.

Degree: PhD, 2016, University of Washington

 Molecular self- and co-assembly of proteins into highly ordered symmetric complexes is an elegant and powerful means of patterning matter at the atomic scale and… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: co-assembly; computational protein design; nanomaterials; polyhedra; self-assembly; structural biology; Biochemistry; Nanoscience; Engineering; molecular and cellular biology

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APA (6th Edition):

Bale, J. B. (2016). Computational design of co-assembling multi-component protein nanomaterials. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/35263

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bale, Jacob Barile. “Computational design of co-assembling multi-component protein nanomaterials.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/35263.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bale, Jacob Barile. “Computational design of co-assembling multi-component protein nanomaterials.” 2016. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Bale JB. Computational design of co-assembling multi-component protein nanomaterials. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2016. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/35263.

Council of Science Editors:

Bale JB. Computational design of co-assembling multi-component protein nanomaterials. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/35263


University of Washington

23. Johansson, Patrik Kjell Ake. Investigations of Protein Fiber Structures and the Interactions at Their Interfaces Using Nonlinear Optical Spectroscopy.

Degree: PhD, 2019, University of Washington

Protein fibers are ubiquitous in nature, either as functional components of cells and tissues, or as hallmarks of severe diseases. Examples include amyloid fibers in… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Amyloids; Collagen; Nonlinear Optics; Protein Fibers; Second-Harmonic Generation; Sum-Frequency Generation; Biomedical engineering; Physical chemistry; Bioengineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Johansson, P. K. A. (2019). Investigations of Protein Fiber Structures and the Interactions at Their Interfaces Using Nonlinear Optical Spectroscopy. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43297

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Johansson, Patrik Kjell Ake. “Investigations of Protein Fiber Structures and the Interactions at Their Interfaces Using Nonlinear Optical Spectroscopy.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43297.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Johansson, Patrik Kjell Ake. “Investigations of Protein Fiber Structures and the Interactions at Their Interfaces Using Nonlinear Optical Spectroscopy.” 2019. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Johansson PKA. Investigations of Protein Fiber Structures and the Interactions at Their Interfaces Using Nonlinear Optical Spectroscopy. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2019. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43297.

Council of Science Editors:

Johansson PKA. Investigations of Protein Fiber Structures and the Interactions at Their Interfaces Using Nonlinear Optical Spectroscopy. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43297


University of Washington

24. Keller, Salka. A Modular pH-Responsive Polymer Platform for Protein-Based Vaccines.

Degree: PhD, 2014, University of Washington

Protein-based subunit vaccines have the potential to combat some of the world's most detrimental infectious diseases, but finding an effective and versatile platform able to… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: CD8 T cell response; mannose; nanoparticle; pH-responsive; polymer micelles; protein subunit vaccine; Biomedical engineering; bioengineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Keller, S. (2014). A Modular pH-Responsive Polymer Platform for Protein-Based Vaccines. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/24992

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Keller, Salka. “A Modular pH-Responsive Polymer Platform for Protein-Based Vaccines.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/24992.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Keller, Salka. “A Modular pH-Responsive Polymer Platform for Protein-Based Vaccines.” 2014. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Keller S. A Modular pH-Responsive Polymer Platform for Protein-Based Vaccines. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2014. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/24992.

Council of Science Editors:

Keller S. A Modular pH-Responsive Polymer Platform for Protein-Based Vaccines. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/24992

25. Ospinal-Jimenez, Monica. Engineering Protein Electrophoresis through Surfactant Design.

Degree: PhD, 2013, University of Washington

Protein separations have important applications in the medical industry. In the absence of physical symptoms, early detection of protein markers for disease can significantly decrease… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: anionic branched surfactants; anionic fluorinated surfactants; pair distance distribution function; protein-surfactant complexes; small angle scattering; sodium dodecyl sulfate; Chemical engineering; chemical engineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Ospinal-Jimenez, M. (2013). Engineering Protein Electrophoresis through Surfactant Design. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/24169

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ospinal-Jimenez, Monica. “Engineering Protein Electrophoresis through Surfactant Design.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/24169.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ospinal-Jimenez, Monica. “Engineering Protein Electrophoresis through Surfactant Design.” 2013. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Ospinal-Jimenez M. Engineering Protein Electrophoresis through Surfactant Design. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2013. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/24169.

Council of Science Editors:

Ospinal-Jimenez M. Engineering Protein Electrophoresis through Surfactant Design. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/24169

26. Burney, Patrick R. Modeling Protein Stability and Structural Preference in Ionic Liquids.

Degree: PhD, 2014, University of Washington

 Ionic liquids have demonstrable suitability as niche alternatives to organic solvents in applied biochemistry. However, many of the known ionic liquids show little to no… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: biocatalysis; biochemical simulations; Molecular dynamics; non-aqueous biocatalysis; Protein engineering; protein structure; Chemical engineering; Biophysics; Biochemistry; chemical engineering

…research objective – to determine which properties of ILs contribute to diminished protein… …between proteins and ILs is an important first step toward effectively engineering ILs and… …that identify aspects of protein structure and solvation that explain the detrimental or… …hypotheses proposed by experimentalists in the field and facilitate engineering of ILs by improving… …approaches toward this goal will combine both studies of protein structural preference in addition… 

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APA (6th Edition):

Burney, P. R. (2014). Modeling Protein Stability and Structural Preference in Ionic Liquids. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/26506

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Burney, Patrick R. “Modeling Protein Stability and Structural Preference in Ionic Liquids.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/26506.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Burney, Patrick R. “Modeling Protein Stability and Structural Preference in Ionic Liquids.” 2014. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Burney PR. Modeling Protein Stability and Structural Preference in Ionic Liquids. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2014. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/26506.

Council of Science Editors:

Burney PR. Modeling Protein Stability and Structural Preference in Ionic Liquids. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/26506

27. Bromley, Dennis N. Visual Analytics Methods for Analyzing Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Mutant Proteins.

Degree: PhD, 2015, University of Washington

 The structural dynamics of proteins are integral to protein function; if these structural dynamics are altered by mutation, the function of the protein can be… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Drug; Protein; Visualization; Bioinformatics; Biomedical engineering; biomedical and health informatics

…303 E.3 Multi-Protein Plots… …Engine), with screenshots. 45 Figure 2.2 The DIVE GUI with the Protein Dashboard pipeline… …49 Figure 2.6 The Protein Dashboard case study… …87 Figure 5.1 The DNA-binding core domain of the p53 tumor suppressor protein… …same protein region from pockets with different surface geometries… 

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APA (6th Edition):

Bromley, D. N. (2015). Visual Analytics Methods for Analyzing Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Mutant Proteins. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/27421

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bromley, Dennis N. “Visual Analytics Methods for Analyzing Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Mutant Proteins.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/27421.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bromley, Dennis N. “Visual Analytics Methods for Analyzing Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Mutant Proteins.” 2015. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Bromley DN. Visual Analytics Methods for Analyzing Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Mutant Proteins. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2015. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/27421.

Council of Science Editors:

Bromley DN. Visual Analytics Methods for Analyzing Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Mutant Proteins. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/27421


University of Washington

28. Avramov, Todor Kirilov. Deep Learning for Validating Resolution and Detecting Secondary Structure Elements of Proteins in 3D Cryo-Electron Microscopy Images.

Degree: 2019, University of Washington

 Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is becoming the imaging method of choice for determining protein structures. Many atomic structures have been resolved based on an exponentially growing… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Convolutional Neural Networks; Cryo-Electron Microscopy; Deep Learning; Multi-class Semantic Segmentation; Protein Structure; Tversky index; Artificial intelligence; Computer science; Computer engineering; Computing and software systems

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APA (6th Edition):

Avramov, T. K. (2019). Deep Learning for Validating Resolution and Detecting Secondary Structure Elements of Proteins in 3D Cryo-Electron Microscopy Images. (Thesis). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43604

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Avramov, Todor Kirilov. “Deep Learning for Validating Resolution and Detecting Secondary Structure Elements of Proteins in 3D Cryo-Electron Microscopy Images.” 2019. Thesis, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43604.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Avramov, Todor Kirilov. “Deep Learning for Validating Resolution and Detecting Secondary Structure Elements of Proteins in 3D Cryo-Electron Microscopy Images.” 2019. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Avramov TK. Deep Learning for Validating Resolution and Detecting Secondary Structure Elements of Proteins in 3D Cryo-Electron Microscopy Images. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2019. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43604.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Avramov TK. Deep Learning for Validating Resolution and Detecting Secondary Structure Elements of Proteins in 3D Cryo-Electron Microscopy Images. [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43604

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

29. Nguyen, Rochelle. Developing a library of recognition proteins using FimH as a protein scaffold.

Degree: 2013, University of Washington

 High specificity recognition proteins, like antibodies, are important biological tools with many applications, including diagnostics, therapeutics, and imaging. However, there are many challenges with antibody… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Activatable recognition protein; Allostery; Alternative scaffold; Library construction; Molecular biology; Protein engineering; Molecular biology; Biomedical engineering; Biology; bioengineering

…From the 3-helix domain Z from staphylococcal protein A, the “affibody” was developed by… …is more ideal for protein-binding, the loop-binding of fibronectin may be more ideal for… …putative binding region, followed by identification of binders to new targets. A suitable protein… …aforementioned protein scaffolds, among others, have demonstrated this quality. However, neither… …2.3 Current strategies for activatable protein binding In general, the most highly specific… 

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APA (6th Edition):

Nguyen, R. (2013). Developing a library of recognition proteins using FimH as a protein scaffold. (Thesis). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/24184

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nguyen, Rochelle. “Developing a library of recognition proteins using FimH as a protein scaffold.” 2013. Thesis, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/24184.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nguyen, Rochelle. “Developing a library of recognition proteins using FimH as a protein scaffold.” 2013. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Nguyen R. Developing a library of recognition proteins using FimH as a protein scaffold. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2013. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/24184.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Nguyen R. Developing a library of recognition proteins using FimH as a protein scaffold. [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/24184

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

30. Matthaei, James Frederick. Two-Dimensional Protein Arrays: De Novo Design And Applications.

Degree: PhD, 2015, University of Washington

 Biological building blocks that self-assemble into predetermined supramolecular structures hold enormous promise for the production of advanced materials, devices and systems. However, our ability to… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: advanced materials; bionanotechnology; computationally design; protein engineering; self-assembly; two dimensional; Chemical engineering; chemical engineering

…fact. S-layer protein engineering has been mainly done by trial and error [79], but… …47 Figure 3.4. General concept for designing novel protein-protein interfaces… …60 Figure 4.2. Engineering S. typhimurium STM4215 for 2D self-assembly… …65 Figure 4.7. Engineering 2D self-assembly… …66 Figure 4.8. Influence of protein concentration, temperature and ion identity on TTM… 

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APA (6th Edition):

Matthaei, J. F. (2015). Two-Dimensional Protein Arrays: De Novo Design And Applications. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33112

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Matthaei, James Frederick. “Two-Dimensional Protein Arrays: De Novo Design And Applications.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed July 03, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33112.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Matthaei, James Frederick. “Two-Dimensional Protein Arrays: De Novo Design And Applications.” 2015. Web. 03 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Matthaei JF. Two-Dimensional Protein Arrays: De Novo Design And Applications. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2015. [cited 2020 Jul 03]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33112.

Council of Science Editors:

Matthaei JF. Two-Dimensional Protein Arrays: De Novo Design And Applications. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33112

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