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Dept: Chemistry and Biochemistry

You searched for subject:(Protein Engineering). Showing records 1 – 15 of 15 total matches.

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University of California – San Diego

1. Maniaci, Brian M. Design of Metal-Controlled Protein-Protein Interactions.

Degree: Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2019, University of California – San Diego

 The field of protein design strives to engineer new molecules that interact in a specific, controlled manner to form novel functional complexes. Engineered proteins that… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Chemistry; Biochemistry; Biomaterials; Metal-Controlled Protein Dimerization; Protein Design; Protein Engineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Maniaci, B. M. (2019). Design of Metal-Controlled Protein-Protein Interactions. (Thesis). University of California – San Diego. Retrieved from http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/0fc2n3qm

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Maniaci, Brian M. “Design of Metal-Controlled Protein-Protein Interactions.” 2019. Thesis, University of California – San Diego. Accessed July 10, 2020. http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/0fc2n3qm.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Maniaci, Brian M. “Design of Metal-Controlled Protein-Protein Interactions.” 2019. Web. 10 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Maniaci BM. Design of Metal-Controlled Protein-Protein Interactions. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of California – San Diego; 2019. [cited 2020 Jul 10]. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/0fc2n3qm.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Maniaci BM. Design of Metal-Controlled Protein-Protein Interactions. [Thesis]. University of California – San Diego; 2019. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/0fc2n3qm

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Georgia Tech

2. Kratzer, James Timothy. Reengineering a human-like uricase for the treatment of gout.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2013, Georgia Tech

 There is an unmet medical need in the treatment of gout. This type of inflammatory arthritis can be efficiently alleviated by the enzyme uricase. This… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Gout; Uricase; Ancestral sequence reconstruction; Protein engineering; Evolutionary synthetic biology; Pseudogene; Enzyme replacement; Therapy; Enzyme assays; Protein purification; Pharmacokinetics; Protein solubility; Evolution

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APA (6th Edition):

Kratzer, J. T. (2013). Reengineering a human-like uricase for the treatment of gout. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/52149

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kratzer, James Timothy. “Reengineering a human-like uricase for the treatment of gout.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed July 10, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/52149.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kratzer, James Timothy. “Reengineering a human-like uricase for the treatment of gout.” 2013. Web. 10 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Kratzer JT. Reengineering a human-like uricase for the treatment of gout. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2013. [cited 2020 Jul 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/52149.

Council of Science Editors:

Kratzer JT. Reengineering a human-like uricase for the treatment of gout. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/52149

3. Huettinger, Karl. Semi-synthetic proteins for catalytic and analytical applications.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2009, Georgia Tech

 Proteins have evolved over millions of years to serve a plethora of highly specialized functions in biological systems. Given the enormous diversity in structure and… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Synthetic cofactor; Protein labeling; Semi-synthetic protein; Myoglobin; Enzymes; Platinum; Environmental chemistry; Proteins; Protein engineering

…116 3.1.1 Selection of Heme Protein… …25 Figure 1-20. Cartoon rendering of X-ray structure of green fluorescent protein (PDB… …29 Figure 1-23. Protein localization using FRET-FLIM microscopy of CFP-YFP couple. A… …101 Figure 3-1. Active site topology of myoglobin (protein crystallographic database… …119 Figure 3-2. Active site topology of cytochrome P450 BM3 (protein crystallographic… 

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APA (6th Edition):

Huettinger, K. (2009). Semi-synthetic proteins for catalytic and analytical applications. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/33823

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Huettinger, Karl. “Semi-synthetic proteins for catalytic and analytical applications.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed July 10, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/33823.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Huettinger, Karl. “Semi-synthetic proteins for catalytic and analytical applications.” 2009. Web. 10 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Huettinger K. Semi-synthetic proteins for catalytic and analytical applications. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2009. [cited 2020 Jul 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/33823.

Council of Science Editors:

Huettinger K. Semi-synthetic proteins for catalytic and analytical applications. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/33823


Georgia Tech

4. Rohatgi, Priyanka. Engineering Protein Molecular Switches To Regulate Gene Expression with Small Molecules.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2006, Georgia Tech

 Small molecule dependent molecular switches that control gene expression are important tool in understanding biological cellular processes and for regulating gene therapy. Nuclear receptors are… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Protein engineering; Nuclear receptor; Gene therapy; Inducible system; Molecular switches; Gene therapy; Ligands (Biochemistry); Protein engineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Rohatgi, P. (2006). Engineering Protein Molecular Switches To Regulate Gene Expression with Small Molecules. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/19852

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rohatgi, Priyanka. “Engineering Protein Molecular Switches To Regulate Gene Expression with Small Molecules.” 2006. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed July 10, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/19852.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rohatgi, Priyanka. “Engineering Protein Molecular Switches To Regulate Gene Expression with Small Molecules.” 2006. Web. 10 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Rohatgi P. Engineering Protein Molecular Switches To Regulate Gene Expression with Small Molecules. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2006. [cited 2020 Jul 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/19852.

Council of Science Editors:

Rohatgi P. Engineering Protein Molecular Switches To Regulate Gene Expression with Small Molecules. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/19852


Georgia Tech

5. Schwimmer, Lauren J. Engineering ligand-receptor pairs for small molecule control of transcription.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2005, Georgia Tech

 Creating receptors for control of transcription with arbitrary small molecules has widespread applications including gene therapy, biosensors, and enzyme engineering. Using the combination of high… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Chemical complementation; Ligand-receptor pair; Protein engineering; Retinoid X receptor; Nuclear receptor; Codon randomized libraries; Transcription factors; Protein engineering; Nuclear receptors (Biochemistry); Genetic engineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Schwimmer, L. J. (2005). Engineering ligand-receptor pairs for small molecule control of transcription. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/11651

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Schwimmer, Lauren J. “Engineering ligand-receptor pairs for small molecule control of transcription.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed July 10, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/11651.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Schwimmer, Lauren J. “Engineering ligand-receptor pairs for small molecule control of transcription.” 2005. Web. 10 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Schwimmer LJ. Engineering ligand-receptor pairs for small molecule control of transcription. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. [cited 2020 Jul 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/11651.

Council of Science Editors:

Schwimmer LJ. Engineering ligand-receptor pairs for small molecule control of transcription. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/11651


Georgia Tech

6. Enekwa, C. Denise. In silico design of novel binding ligands for biological targets.

Degree: MS, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2010, Georgia Tech

 An in silico design algorithm has been developed to design binding ligands for protein targets of known three-dimensional structure. In this method, the binding energy… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: De novo binding; In silico design; Protein docking; Computer simulation; Ligand binding (Biochemistry); Protein engineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Enekwa, C. D. (2010). In silico design of novel binding ligands for biological targets. (Masters Thesis). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/41067

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Enekwa, C Denise. “In silico design of novel binding ligands for biological targets.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Georgia Tech. Accessed July 10, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/41067.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Enekwa, C Denise. “In silico design of novel binding ligands for biological targets.” 2010. Web. 10 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Enekwa CD. In silico design of novel binding ligands for biological targets. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2010. [cited 2020 Jul 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/41067.

Council of Science Editors:

Enekwa CD. In silico design of novel binding ligands for biological targets. [Masters Thesis]. Georgia Tech; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/41067


Georgia Tech

7. Offenbacher, Adam R. Protein structural changes and tyrosyl radical-mediated electron transfer reactions in ribonucleotide reductase and model compounds.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2011, Georgia Tech

 Tyrosyl radicals can facilitate proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions that are linked to catalysis in many biological systems. One such protein system is ribonucleotide reductase… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cytochrome c oxidase; Escherichia coli; UV resonance Raman spectroscopy; FT-IR spectroscopy; Infrared spectroscopy; Proton-coupled electron transfer; Oxidation-reduction reaction; Protein engineering; Tyrosine

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APA (6th Edition):

Offenbacher, A. R. (2011). Protein structural changes and tyrosyl radical-mediated electron transfer reactions in ribonucleotide reductase and model compounds. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39473

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Offenbacher, Adam R. “Protein structural changes and tyrosyl radical-mediated electron transfer reactions in ribonucleotide reductase and model compounds.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed July 10, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39473.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Offenbacher, Adam R. “Protein structural changes and tyrosyl radical-mediated electron transfer reactions in ribonucleotide reductase and model compounds.” 2011. Web. 10 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Offenbacher AR. Protein structural changes and tyrosyl radical-mediated electron transfer reactions in ribonucleotide reductase and model compounds. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. [cited 2020 Jul 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39473.

Council of Science Editors:

Offenbacher AR. Protein structural changes and tyrosyl radical-mediated electron transfer reactions in ribonucleotide reductase and model compounds. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39473

8. Johnson, Kenyetta Alicia. Extending chemical complemenation to bacteria and furthering nuclear receptor based protein engineering and drug discovery.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2009, Georgia Tech

 Nuclear receptors (NRs) are modular ligand-activated transcription factors that control a broad range of physiological processes by regulating the expression of essential genes involved in… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Protein engineering; Nuclear receptor; Chemical complementation; Drug discovery; Nuclear receptors (Biochemistry); Developmental pharmacology; Protein engineering; Yeast Genetics

…based protein engineering and drug discovery, chemical complementation in S. cerevisiae was… …made. Understanding NR structure has provided insights into protein engineering as a tool to… …839. 5. Rohatgi P (2006) Engineering protein molecular switches to regulate gene… …Components of the BCC system Enhancing Heterologous Protein Expression and Stability 4.2.1 Analysis… …82 85 87 93 97 99 100 105 LIGAND-RECEPTOR CHARGE REVERSAL VIA GENETIC ENGINEERING 113… 

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APA (6th Edition):

Johnson, K. A. (2009). Extending chemical complemenation to bacteria and furthering nuclear receptor based protein engineering and drug discovery. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/29652

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Johnson, Kenyetta Alicia. “Extending chemical complemenation to bacteria and furthering nuclear receptor based protein engineering and drug discovery.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed July 10, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/29652.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Johnson, Kenyetta Alicia. “Extending chemical complemenation to bacteria and furthering nuclear receptor based protein engineering and drug discovery.” 2009. Web. 10 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Johnson KA. Extending chemical complemenation to bacteria and furthering nuclear receptor based protein engineering and drug discovery. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2009. [cited 2020 Jul 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/29652.

Council of Science Editors:

Johnson KA. Extending chemical complemenation to bacteria and furthering nuclear receptor based protein engineering and drug discovery. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/29652

9. Rood, Michael K. Enzyme-activated growth: development of a nuclear receptor based genetic selection system for engineering biocatalysts.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2014, Georgia Tech

 Beyond their physiological roles, nuclear receptors have been exploited for their ability to act as intracellular sensors of small molecules. Accordingly, yeast two- and three-hybrid… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Estrogen receptor; Protein engineering; Genetic selection; Biocatalysis; Breast cancer; Nuclear receptors

protein engineering applications, particularly of the nuclear receptor ligand binding domain. In… …53 CHAPTER 3 ENGINEERING INCREASED LIGAND SENSITIVITY IN ERα: EFFECT OF SURFACE MUTATIONS… …PDB code 2P15) (cyan). Protein is shown in cartoon representation and co… …Fluormone® ES2 Green FP Fluorescence Polarization FPLC Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography FXR… …Farnesoid X Receptor GAD Gal4 Activation Domain Gal4p Gal4 protein GDBD Gal4 DNA Binding… 

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APA (6th Edition):

Rood, M. K. (2014). Enzyme-activated growth: development of a nuclear receptor based genetic selection system for engineering biocatalysts. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/53072

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rood, Michael K. “Enzyme-activated growth: development of a nuclear receptor based genetic selection system for engineering biocatalysts.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed July 10, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/53072.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rood, Michael K. “Enzyme-activated growth: development of a nuclear receptor based genetic selection system for engineering biocatalysts.” 2014. Web. 10 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Rood MK. Enzyme-activated growth: development of a nuclear receptor based genetic selection system for engineering biocatalysts. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2014. [cited 2020 Jul 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/53072.

Council of Science Editors:

Rood MK. Enzyme-activated growth: development of a nuclear receptor based genetic selection system for engineering biocatalysts. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/53072

10. Paye, Mariétou F. Biocatalysis of amide and peptide bond synthesis by cocaine esterase and α-amino acid ester hydrolase.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2017, Georgia Tech

 Amide and peptide bonds-containing compounds are ubiquitous in Nature and popular in the pharmaceutical and chemical industries. Amide bond synthesis occurs with an un-activated (thermodynamic… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Protein engineering; Beta-lactam antibiotics; Amino acid ester hydrolase; Cocaine esterase; pH colorimetry; pH modeling

…22 2.3 Protein Engineering… …engineering of a protein biocatalyst are thermodynamic stability and kinetic stability… …thermodynamic and kinetic stability.44, 15 45 The goal of protein engineering is therefore to… …x29;. These issues have significantly hindered the progress of protein engineering of AEH… …Minute M Molar N Native protein NAD+ Oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide NADH… 

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APA (6th Edition):

Paye, M. F. (2017). Biocatalysis of amide and peptide bond synthesis by cocaine esterase and α-amino acid ester hydrolase. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/59218

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Paye, Mariétou F. “Biocatalysis of amide and peptide bond synthesis by cocaine esterase and α-amino acid ester hydrolase.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed July 10, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/59218.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Paye, Mariétou F. “Biocatalysis of amide and peptide bond synthesis by cocaine esterase and α-amino acid ester hydrolase.” 2017. Web. 10 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Paye MF. Biocatalysis of amide and peptide bond synthesis by cocaine esterase and α-amino acid ester hydrolase. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2017. [cited 2020 Jul 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/59218.

Council of Science Editors:

Paye MF. Biocatalysis of amide and peptide bond synthesis by cocaine esterase and α-amino acid ester hydrolase. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/59218


Georgia Tech

11. Watt, Terry J. Engineering a better receptor: characterization of retinoid x receptor alpha and functional variants.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2007, Georgia Tech

 The human retinoid X receptor alpha (hRXRalpha) is a member of the nuclear receptor super-family of ligand-activated transcription factors. The Doyle laboratory has previously engineered… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Ligand binding; Protein engineering; Oligomerization; Thermal denaturation; Retinoid X receptor; Retinoids; Nuclear receptors (Biochemistry); Ligand binding (Biochemistry); DNA

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APA (6th Edition):

Watt, T. J. (2007). Engineering a better receptor: characterization of retinoid x receptor alpha and functional variants. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/26647

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Watt, Terry J. “Engineering a better receptor: characterization of retinoid x receptor alpha and functional variants.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed July 10, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/26647.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Watt, Terry J. “Engineering a better receptor: characterization of retinoid x receptor alpha and functional variants.” 2007. Web. 10 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Watt TJ. Engineering a better receptor: characterization of retinoid x receptor alpha and functional variants. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. [cited 2020 Jul 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/26647.

Council of Science Editors:

Watt TJ. Engineering a better receptor: characterization of retinoid x receptor alpha and functional variants. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/26647

12. Taylor, Jennifer. Engineering and improving a molecular switch system for gene therapy applications.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2011, Georgia Tech

 Molecular switch systems that activate gene expression by a small molecule are effective technologies that are widely used in applied biological research. Previously, two orthogonal… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Protein engineering; Gene therapy; Molecular switch systems; Gene regulation systems; RXR; Nuclear receptors; Gene therapy; Nuclear receptors (Biochemistry); Ligands (Biochemistry)

…receptors can also be used for applications such as protein engineering and gene therapy [83… …Switch System 79 4.1 Engineering the QCIMFI Variant 79 4.2 Characterization of GRQCIMFI in… …Inducible System 34 Figure 2.5: Schematic Diagram of Rheoswitch® 36 Figure 3.1: Engineering a… …Domain GFP Green Fluorescent Protein H12 Helix 12 HAT Histone Acetyltransferase HDAC… …Progesterone Receptor PXR Pregnane X Receptor RE Response Element RFP Red Fluorescent Protein… 

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APA (6th Edition):

Taylor, J. (2011). Engineering and improving a molecular switch system for gene therapy applications. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39501

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Taylor, Jennifer. “Engineering and improving a molecular switch system for gene therapy applications.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed July 10, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39501.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Taylor, Jennifer. “Engineering and improving a molecular switch system for gene therapy applications.” 2011. Web. 10 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Taylor J. Engineering and improving a molecular switch system for gene therapy applications. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. [cited 2020 Jul 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39501.

Council of Science Editors:

Taylor J. Engineering and improving a molecular switch system for gene therapy applications. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39501

13. Castillo, Hilda S. Mutational analysis and engineering of the human vitamin D receptor to bind and activate in response to a novel small molecule ligand.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2011, Georgia Tech

 Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate the expression of genes involved in all physiological activities. Disruption in NR function (e.g. mutations) can… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Mutagenesis; Protein engineering; Nuclear receptor; Vitamin D receptor; Lithocholic acid; Cholecalciferol; Ligands (Biochemistry); Vitamin D in the body; Nuclear receptors (Biochemistry)

…drug-like’ molecules also make these receptors attractive candidates for protein engineering… …discovery, NRs are also attractive candidates for protein engineering. Although most NRs have the… …attractive candidates for protein engineering, such that these receptors can be engineered to bind… …x29;2D3 43 ix Figure 3.1: Engineering the hVDR to Bind and Activate in Response to A Novel… …PDB Protein Data Bank PPARs Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors PR Progesterone… 

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APA (6th Edition):

Castillo, H. S. (2011). Mutational analysis and engineering of the human vitamin D receptor to bind and activate in response to a novel small molecule ligand. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39502

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Castillo, Hilda S. “Mutational analysis and engineering of the human vitamin D receptor to bind and activate in response to a novel small molecule ligand.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed July 10, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39502.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Castillo, Hilda S. “Mutational analysis and engineering of the human vitamin D receptor to bind and activate in response to a novel small molecule ligand.” 2011. Web. 10 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Castillo HS. Mutational analysis and engineering of the human vitamin D receptor to bind and activate in response to a novel small molecule ligand. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. [cited 2020 Jul 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39502.

Council of Science Editors:

Castillo HS. Mutational analysis and engineering of the human vitamin D receptor to bind and activate in response to a novel small molecule ligand. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39502

14. Ousley, Amanda. Engineering the human vitamin D receptor to bind a novel small molecule: investigating the structure-function relationship between human vitamin d receptor and various ligands.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2011, Georgia Tech

 The human vitamin D receptor (hVDR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, involved in calcium and phosphate homeostasis; hence implicated in a number… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Lithocholic acid; Cholecalciferol; Human vitamin D receptor; Nuclear receptors; Vitamin D in the body; Protein engineering; Ligand binding (Biochemistry); Receptor complexes (Biochemistry); Mutagenesis

…receptors make great targets for drug design and protein engineering. Protein engineering of… …relationship between the receptors and ligands. hVDR makes a good target for protein engineering due… …gained via protein engineering will allow for a better understanding of this receptor such as… …Fusion Protein Cleavage and Purification 5.3 Summary and Future Work viii 117 119 5.4… …Purification 122 5.4.5 Cleaving and Purifying the Fusion Protein 122 5.5 References 123 CHAPTER… 

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APA (6th Edition):

Ousley, A. (2011). Engineering the human vitamin D receptor to bind a novel small molecule: investigating the structure-function relationship between human vitamin d receptor and various ligands. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39580

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ousley, Amanda. “Engineering the human vitamin D receptor to bind a novel small molecule: investigating the structure-function relationship between human vitamin d receptor and various ligands.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed July 10, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39580.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ousley, Amanda. “Engineering the human vitamin D receptor to bind a novel small molecule: investigating the structure-function relationship between human vitamin d receptor and various ligands.” 2011. Web. 10 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Ousley A. Engineering the human vitamin D receptor to bind a novel small molecule: investigating the structure-function relationship between human vitamin d receptor and various ligands. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. [cited 2020 Jul 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39580.

Council of Science Editors:

Ousley A. Engineering the human vitamin D receptor to bind a novel small molecule: investigating the structure-function relationship between human vitamin d receptor and various ligands. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39580

15. Shaffer, Hally A. Engineering the pregnane X receptor and estrogen receptor alpha to bind novel small molecules using negative chemical complementation.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry and Biochemistry, 2011, Georgia Tech

 Nuclear receptors are ligand-activated transcription factors that play significant roles in various biological processes within the body, such as cell development, hormone metabolism, reproduction, and… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Nuclear receptors; Chemical complementation; Negative chemical complementation; Yeast-two hybrid selection; Pregnane X receptor; Estrogen receptor; Pregnane; Protein engineering; Nuclear receptors (Biochemistry); Transcription factors; Yeast Genetics

…Fulvestrant 174 6.4 Using Negative Chemical Complementation for Protein Engineering 177 6.5… …Figure 6.11: Scheme of Using Negative Chemical Complementation for Protein Engineering 178… …protein engineering applications. The original focus of this work was to use chemical… …engineering, functional protein variants 14 can be discovered through the survival of the yeast… …Engineering nuclear receptors Chemical complementation is also a powerful tool for directed protein… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Shaffer, H. A. (2011). Engineering the pregnane X receptor and estrogen receptor alpha to bind novel small molecules using negative chemical complementation. (Doctoral Dissertation). Georgia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39620

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Shaffer, Hally A. “Engineering the pregnane X receptor and estrogen receptor alpha to bind novel small molecules using negative chemical complementation.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Georgia Tech. Accessed July 10, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39620.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Shaffer, Hally A. “Engineering the pregnane X receptor and estrogen receptor alpha to bind novel small molecules using negative chemical complementation.” 2011. Web. 10 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Shaffer HA. Engineering the pregnane X receptor and estrogen receptor alpha to bind novel small molecules using negative chemical complementation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. [cited 2020 Jul 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39620.

Council of Science Editors:

Shaffer HA. Engineering the pregnane X receptor and estrogen receptor alpha to bind novel small molecules using negative chemical complementation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Georgia Tech; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1853/39620

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